One leg shorter.Ha!

Hi,
I am very new to this gathering but you may listen.
Few days ago I had idea of compensating 2cm leg lenth inequality by adjusting left crank shaft.
I have put it into practice.
I am 67y.old so when experiencing dificulty in balancing taller unis
(the taler the more diffculties I had) I felt it was the age which was agaist me.
Having adjusted lenth of the cranks I have experienced vast improvement in handling tall unis.In fact, instantly, I had confidence with 26" as with 20".
It is very early message.I will adjust my remining “talls” an give a feed back.
Almost 6% of population has various degrees of leg lenth inequality.Up to 2cm is considered “normal” by the orthopaedic surgeons. As I am one of them I was indoctrinated this way.NOT ANY LONGER thanks to unicycling.
In the light of the opprtunity creted by Roger Davis - customized cranks.There is a chance for various cripples like me to have a second chance.

                                                           Uniwitold.

Re: One leg shorter.Ha!

Uniwitold wrote:
>
> Hi,
> I am very new to this gathering but you may listen.
> Few days ago I had idea of compensating 2cm leg lenth inequality by
> adjusting left crank shaft.

Greetings,

In what manner did the problem manifest itself? Did your unicycle pull
to one side or…? Also, as an orthopedic surgeon can you estimate a
percentage of how many people have a leg length inequality? Is it a
common occurrence?

Just curious…

Cheers,

Jason

Re: One leg shorter.Ha!

Uniwitold wrote:
>
> Hi,
> I am very new to this gathering but you may listen.
> Few days ago I had idea of compensating 2cm leg lenth inequality by
> adjusting left crank shaft.
> I have put it into practice.
> I am 67y.old so when experiencing dificulty in balancing taller unis
> (the taler the more diffculties I had) I felt it was the age which was
> agaist me.
> Having adjusted lenth of the cranks I have experienced vast improvement
> in handling tall unis.In fact, instantly, I had confidence with 26" as
> with 20".
> It is very early message.I will adjust my remining “talls” an give a
> feed back.
> Almost 6% of population has various degrees of leg lenth inequality.Up
> to 2cm is considered “normal” by the orthopaedic surgeons. As I am one
> of them I was indoctrinated this way.NOT ANY LONGER thanks to
> unicycling.
> In the light of the opprtunity creted by Roger Davis - customized
> cranks.There is a chance for various cripples like me to have a second
> chance.
>
> Uniwitold.
>
> –
> Uniwitold
>
> Veni !Vidi !Mount !
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Uniwitold’s Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/2181
> View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/21697

Re: One leg shorter.Ha!

> Almost 6% of population has various degrees of leg lenth inequality.

Man, I am a nit! Sorry.

I suspect that my left leg might be very slightly shorter than the right. How do you identify something like that (without shelling out the clams on one of those newfangled “doctors”)?

I definitely favor my right side, which causes some problems on the uni. It could just be that my right leg is stronger, but it could also be that my right leg is longer.

How to mesure the leg lenth

Mr nabrazzi Sir,
I am learning how to use this electonic mashinery.Out of confusion I did not answer your basic question.
You have to ask sombody to mesure your legs.
There are two sticking bones above your groins (anterior suprior iliac spines).There is natural depression just below this protusion where one puts beginning of the tape mesure.Then run the tape mesure to the medial end of the ankle(medial malleolus).
Repeat this experience some 3 times,because of variation in placing the mesure.Then you will have pretty good idea of your leg lenth.
Good lack with the mesure
Uniwitold.:slight_smile:

One leg shorter…to Jason

Dear Jason,
Thank you for the communication.Due to may total confusion as to how to operate correspodece (hopefully I will recover). I have answered your question to “nabrazzi” i.e. what were the symptoms of leg lenth inequality.Please have a peep on his panel.
All the best
Uniwitold.

Interesting,

I never considered different crank lengths. Might help! I always have to fight a left turning tendency on the unibike. I’ve tried offsetting the wheel, tilting the wheel, offsetting the seat, etc. I still turn left if I don’t correct for it. The short leg is within a half-inch of the other (after many surgeries), but I have always suspected it to be the problem. I also have a lot of trouble with spinning while idling the MUni. Nice to know I’m not the only one.

BTW, if you have a short leg, you should pay extra attention to correct lifting. You have much more back strain on the side with the longer leg. It’s easy to wind up with permanent damage on one side. Bad leg on one side; bad back on the other (anybody got any spare parts?). They tell me fusion is the only fix. If it’s too heavy to lift properly, don’t lift it!

I’m interested to hear test results on this crank modification.

Re: One leg shorter.Ha!

“Uniwitold” <Uniwitold.ec73y@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:Uniwitold.ec73y@timelimit.unicyclist.com
>
> Hi,
> I am very new to this gathering but you may listen.
> Few days ago I had idea of compensating 2cm leg lenth inequality by
> adjusting left crank shaft.

I wonder though, whether a better alternative might be either a jacked up
shoe or an extra bit of something to “thicken” your pedal on the short leg
side of the bike.
Your method will have a significant inequality in the amount of force
imparted by the two legs.

Naomi

Better option

Dear Noami,
Your comment is so stright forward practical ,strikingly typical for the woman common sense.I am not sexist as I feel that if it was not for stright mind of our Mothers we would not survive ! Thanks.

I am aware of different torqu being delivered.
I am not saing I am right in my handling of the case.
It appears to be working ,so far.
Many years ago I have compensated for the leg leth on the left by shoe rise.It was not happy experience.So I stopped at that.

In conclusion I do compliccate things.It is in my designe.So can not be a mother ! It makes me saad.
All the best

Ps.I suspect dismouning with a shoe rise may be a problem. Uniwitold.:slight_smile:

Re: Re: One leg shorter.Ha!

That’s what I was thinking. A shorter crank would help with being able to reach the pedal at the bottom of the stroke, but when it is at the top your foot is further away than it would be had you not shortened the crank.

If you build up the pedal or shoe or whatever, then you’re effectively increasing the length of your leg to match the other, rather than trying to compensate by adjusting an external parameter.

Have fun!

Graeme

Superb adjustement of the idea

Dear Graeme,
Thank you.I do follow your way of thinking.I have plunged myselve in what I have initially described.There is obvious improvement of handling sure.The thought of the pedal being distal in top position caressed my mind,but I did not work out what you have done.
I will complete my trick with other bikes and then try what you have decribed.
The benefit of your solution is standard = "personalized "dismount.
Thanks again
All the best
Uniwitold.

there’s this guy in my school, and one of his legs is about 4 or 5 inches longer than the other. He has to only walk on his toe on that foot. I wonder what he would do?

anyways, i think the idea of putting something underneath your foot would work better.

Also, because you’re going to have to bend one leg more than the other at the top of the pedal stroke. I d’ont know if this would have much relevance, but mybe it could lead to unevel wear of the legs :roll_eyes: i d’ont know. I’ll stop talking now:p

well that’s about all i have to say,

-Ryan

M…extreme is extreme !

Dear M_extreme-uni,
Thank you,
Certainly in extreme situations there are quite extensive methods of achieving balance some more succesfull than other.
In the case up to 2cm of inequality I an trying v.subltle correction.
There is no question, as you have said, that the wear and tear in the joints is uneven…no matter what you do.
You have observed, hovever,what I did(after comment of Graeme) whatever you do, the outcome is… IF YOU CORRECT ON DOWNSTROKE YOU GET TOO MOCH LENTH OF THE CRANK WHEN THE PEDAL IS UP in case making pedal correction exactly opposite occurs in crank correction.
Conclusion .Correcting errors of Nature isn’t easy Ha!
All the best
Uniwitold.

Boulderdash.Ha…!

I have assumed ,in the past, that various problems in my monoattempts were due to unequal leg lenth (Lt.>2cm).
It took several month of extra practice and a bit of £’s to find out that the opinion of orhopaedic surgeons is basically RIGHT = up to 2cm of leg lenth inequality is considered to be ‘NORMAL’.
Having progressed a bit in skill, to voice an opinion ,I have reverted to
the equal lenth cranks.
I have realized, with pleasure, the task was easier with the equal cranks.
Obviously I have to make provision to meet the needs of inequality half way through by adjusting saddle hight.
One of the bauties of this sport is, it incerases ability to read the body.
Uniwitold.:wink:

I don’t know who Naomi is in real life but she always has such amazingly insightful posts. A clever mind at work!

I was born with one leg over 2 inches longer than the other.
When I was 16 I had an operation which removed the growth plate from my right knee, stopping the growth of my leg. Then, by the time I was 18, my other leg (the shorter one) had caught up and they were both the same size.
An easy way to find out if your legs are the same length is with a big phone book.
Open the phone book, stand on it, and keep turning pages until your knees are even and your hips are straight. I used to always stand with one leg bent to compensate for the extra length which made standing for long periods uncomfortable as all my weight was on one leg.
As a kid, I was always hopeless at sports because I had bad balance due to my longer leg. Now, fixed, I notice vast improvements in all my physical activity.

As for cranks, as a youngster I used to race racing bikes in lots of competitions. I used to have a sponsor (LBS) which fitted me out in a bike in which one crank was longer than the other.
I have also seen a velodrome rider with a ‘cleat expander’ which sits under his cleat and raises his shorter leg.
I have seen the various shoes with raised soles; for three years I wore a pair of boots with a ‘platform’ on one side and a normal shoe on the other.

I didnt start unicycling till I was 18; so I dont know how I would have gone with the difference in leg lengths; but I have an idea it would have made it much more difficult.

Cleat expander…?

Hi Samuel.
TU. Is cleat expander fitted to the shoe?
Please elaborate a bit. :thinking:

Cleat expander goes between the shoe and the cleat. It is essentially a piece of plastic which ‘expands’ the distance between the pedal and the shoe.
The guy who had one made it himself; although I’m sure you can buy one pre-made from somewhere.

well I was favoring my left side, then the chiropractor take a look
at my spine and said “turning to your left must be easier”
-“how do you know?”
-“your spine is twisted to the left : you can’t bend easily right in front of you, and the right side is your weak spot!”

so may be finding a good doctor might be of some help after all :wink:

bear