One-foot wheel walk and gliding

Tonight was a great night. My college football (American) team had an amazing game, and they won, and right after that I had an excellent training session… 20m with one-foot wheel walk with an occasional glide of 1m.

Now for the point of this message. Now that I’m so pumped about this wheel-walking stuff and rapidly improving, I want to move into gliding. What is the best way to learn how to transition from normal pedaling speed straight to gliding? My problem is that I don’t get going fast enough from wheel walking and can’t glide for long. I have attempted to transition from normal riding many times with no fruits. Maybe I just need to try more, I don’t know. I thought I’d just throw this up here to see if there is great light on the subject. Thanks for any advice!

I learned to glide towards the end of this summer… here’s what’s worked
with me: All of my initial practice was done on a hill. There was a nice,
gentle sloped hill in my apartment parking lot. I would go from idling
directly into gliding, with gravity’s help.

I am right-foot dominant at most things. I can ride one-footed with either
foot, but my right foot is substantially better than my left. When I
learned to one-foot ww, and glide, my left foot was always the one doing
the work. I never bothered to figure out why, but it worked to my benefit.
I can now just ride really fast, and take my left foot off the pedal, as
if I was going to ride one-footed. Instead, I place that foot on the tire,
and promptly move my right foot from the pedal to the frame. If you
haven’t learned one-footed riding, and one-footed wheel walking with
opposite feet as I have, it might be a little trickier, but I’m sure
you’ll eventually feel it. (And if you glide enough, you’ll want to learn
it with the other foot. I’ve got a pair of shoes with huge glide holes on
the left, and the right still looks brand new)

Another tip, though I don’t have much experience with this one. Find a
patient friend, and have him pull you along. A few nights ago, I had my
roommate tie a piece of rope to his bike. He would start riding, with me
holding onto the rope, pedaling behind. Then, transition into gliding, and
go. I was already decent at gliding when I first tried this, but it
certainly felt a lot easer than usual. First off, you don’t have to be
riding very fast when you transition from riding to gliding. You know no
matter what, the guy on the bike will keep pulling you forwards. Finally,
once you are in glide mode, this force continues, and consistently at
that. (If you try the bike thing, just remember a few things – first off,
the guy on the bike will have to work for it. We made it to 10.5mph on
flat land, with the guy on the bike pedaling with all the force he could
manage. That gliding foot of mine makes a quite effective break. Of
course, if you’re still new to gliding, I’m sure common sense will prevent
you from trying to go as fast as possible.)

Aside from that, just keep practicing, and get a pair of skateboaring
shoes if you don’t have one already. (Well, as long as you’re not using
running or basketball shoes. You want a soul with both grip, and a flat
surface made of only one material.)

> Now for the point of this message. Now that I’m so pumped about this
> wheel-walking stuff and rapidly improving, I want to move into gliding.
> What is the best way to learn how to transition from normal pedaling
> speed straight to gliding? My problem is that I don’t get going fast
> enough from wheel walking and can’t glide for long. I have attempted to
> transition from normal riding many times with no fruits. Maybe I just
> need to try more, I don’t know. I thought I’d just throw this up here to
> see if there is great light on the subject. Thanks for any advice!

Sent via the Unicyclist Community - http://Unicyclist.com

The ONLY gliding I have engaged in was feet-off. 12 years ago, bombing down a hill at tops speed (for me, on a 24"), I lost the pedals. For a while I tried to put my feet back on- no can do; I was picking up speed. I would guess I traveled about 100’ ( not due to skill- just dum luck and speed) with an out of controll pogo sitck lodged under me before the UPD (well, I wanted off- does that still count as an UPD, even if I did not pick the moment?). The help of a hill for gliding sure seems to work, like it or not.

Jeff, how long of a rope did you use? I figure a real long rope would even out any insidental movements of the bike, while an ultra short would keep you right behind it- but point you imediately where ever it goes, and on it’s back wheel in a sudden slow down.

Crazy gliders!

Christopher LeFay

I’ve seen springy tow ropes for cars which minimise jerky tugging as the
pulling vehicle moves off, whilst the pulled vehicle is stationary.
Clearly these ropes are designed for pulling several tons (high modulous
of elasticity) so they’re far too heavy-duty for a unicyclist.

Would it help to use a slightly stretchy rope when learning to pull-glide?

Just curious.

Andrew xADF

In article <9t8j9r$sqa$1@laurel.tc.umn.edu>, “rhysling”
<forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote:

> The ONLY gliding I have in engaged in was feet off. 12 years ago bombing
> down a hill at tops speed (for me, on a 24") I lost the pedals. For a
> while I tried to put my feet back on- no can do; I was picking up speed.
> I would guess I traveled about 100’ ( not due to skill- just dum luck
> and speed) with an out of controll pogo sitck lodged under me before the
> UPD (well, I wanted off- does that still count as an UPD, even if I did
> not pick the moment?). The help of a hill for gliding sure seems to
> work, like it or not.
>
> Jeff, how long of a rope did you use? I figure a real long rope would
> even out any insidental movements of the bike, while an ultra short
> would keep you right behind it- but point you imediately where ever it
> goes, and on it’s back wheel in a sudden slow down.
>
> Crazy gliders!
>
> Christopher LeFay
>
>
>
>
> –
> rhysling Posted via the Unicyclist Community -
> http://unicyclist.com/forums

> Jeff, how long of a rope did you use? I figure a real long rope would
> even out any insidental movements of the bike, while an ultra short
> would keep you right behind it- but point you imediately where ever it
> goes, and on it’s back wheel in a sudden slow down.

I don’t think the length matters much. (I believe the one I used was about
5’) The most important thing is that you don’t have any slack in it. (Ok,
as you get better at gliding, it’s not such a big deal, but if you’re in
the process of learning, you want a constant pulling force.) I never even
gave steering much thought, since I control that myself. However, if
you’re still learning, the bike will certainly have an effect. No matter
what the length of the rope, I expect if the bike makes a sharp turn, you
on the unicycle will have to turn yourself to compensate. Having the rope
should make turning easer, but the decision of when and how much to turn
is still up to the unicyclist.

jl

Sent via the Unicyclist Community - http://Unicyclist.com

On Sun, 18 Nov 2001 15:15:07 +0000 (UTC), rhysling
<forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote:

>The ONLY gliding I have in engaged in was feet off. 12 years ago bombing
>down a hill at tops speed (for me, on a 24") I lost the pedals. For a
>while I tried to put my feet back on- no can do; I was picking up speed.
>I would guess I traveled about 100’ ( not due to skill- just dum luck and
>speed) with an out of controll pogo sitck lodged under me before the UPD
>(well, I wanted off- does that still count as an UPD, even if I did not
>pick the moment?).

Definitely a UPD I would say. Even though you wanted to dismount, there
was no plan - neither predetermined nor made-up at the moment (as you had
no control).

Klaas Bil

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “NIOG, Cipro, El Shifa (Sudan)”

I did plan to screem alot- and succeded.

Christopher

Excuse my utter ignorance, but what is UPD?
My only guesses are unplanned dismount or unpredicted dismount or unpretty dismount…

klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl writes:
>On Sun, 18 Nov 2001 15:15:07 +0000 (UTC), rhysling
><forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote:
>
>>The ONLY gliding I have in engaged in was feet off. 12 years ago bombing
>>down a hill at tops speed (for me, on a 24") I lost the pedals. For a
>>while I tried to put my feet back on- no can do; I was picking up speed.
>>I would guess I traveled about 100’ ( not due to skill- just dum luck
>>and speed) with an out of controll pogo sitck lodged under me before the
>>UPD (well, I wanted off- does that still count as an UPD, even if I did
>>not pick the moment?).
>
>Definitely a UPD I would say. Even though you wanted to dismount, there
>was no plan - neither predetermined nor made-up at the moment (as you had
>no control).
>
>Klaas Bil

A very impressive event, indeed, but to clarify (since I made up the
term): UPD (UnPlanned Dismount) involves landing on the feet and a
FALL (fall) involves landing at some point on something quite other
than the feet.

Depending on how your ‘event’ played out, you either ended in a fall
(still, quite a heroic and thrilling one) or landed on your feet for one
of the coolest UPDs ever.

PS: I have had many UPDs off the Coker but only the one fall, mentioned
last week.

David Stone Co-founder, Unatics of NY 1st Sunday / 3rd Saturday @ Central
Park Bandshell
1:30 start time after 11/1/01

tron wrote:
>
> Excuse my utter ignorance, but what is UPD? My only guesses are
> unplanned dismount or unpredicted dismount or unpretty dismount…

YUP! :slight_smile:

I was temporarly on my feet, but the world was spinning too fast beneath me; It must have looked rediculous- me doing the Scoobie Doo leg spinning motion, then a forward roll. It may have looked cool from a perspective other than my own. I was equally freaked out by my lack of injuries- it could have gone very badly, as I wore no protection back then.

Christopher LeFay