One Dead Norco...

Well, the inevitable has happened. My Norco 24" finally died.

I have had it for the last 10 years, but never really started riding it
until this year when I met Mike King. I have been trying to follow him
around on the dirt trails all summer, and it has been one continuous
replacement process. First it was the seat clamp, which was woefully
inadequate for my acrobatic contortions. Then it was the tire, which went
from a street slick to a knobbier 1.95" wide one. After that, one of the
cotter pins on the cranks snapped. Replaced them, but on closer inspection
found that the holes where the axle goes through was stretching out.
Welded the cranks onto the axle. Things had been going well for about the
last month, with me rapidly improving and my crappy seat rapidly losing
vinyl. Who could’ve anticipated what was to happen next?

Anybody with half a brain, I guess.

I was out last night on the streets by my house practicing going up curbs,
the rounded ones that other people in this group probably don’t even think
twice about. About 10 minutes into the ride, I felt that one of the crank
arms were bent. About 20 feet further, I could feel that it was loose. Did
the welds break? I got off to check, no, they were still just fine. Got on
and rode another 20 feet, when Bessie dumped me on my butt on the
sidewalk, pulling a muscle in my knee.

Oh Bessie, why hast thou forsaken me???

The axle snapped where the groove is cut in to make room for the cotter
pin. I admitted defeat and walked back home, not feeling like learning how
to one foot with a jagged piece of metal sticking out the other side of
the unicycle.

So, what do I do now? The way I look at it I have 4 choices:

  1. One foot. Everywhere. Not an inviting proposition at this point.

  2. Get hold of a cutting torch and turn it into an ultimate wheel. This
    doesn’t intrigue me much either.

  3. Buy a new unicycle. This one appeals to me very much, but I wouldn’t be
    able to ride for the rest of the season until I save up enough money to
    buy a new one.

  4. Put a new hub and cranks on this one. The cheapest solution, so
    therefore the most viable one.

I looked on unicycle.com today and saw that they have Suzue 28 hole hubs
for sale. Does anyone know if this could be fitted on to an older Norco?
My rim is a 28 hole, but I don’t know how wide the existing hub is. My
Norco has cast aluminum lollipop bearing holders. I have access to a
bandsaw to get them off the broken axle.

I looked at new unicycles as well, for something that would last me a year
or so until I can buy a good quality Muni. The ones that I might be able
to afford are the $179 United or the $279 Semcycle XL. I would like to buy
the cheaper United wheel, but I am concerned about strength as I am
185lbs, grew up on a farm, and have stronger than average legs. Is there
any difference in the axle strength between these two wheels? I’m not too
worried about wheel strength because at the moment I have problems going
off a 4 inch drop (I’m not that good yet :). However I can exert quite a
bit of force on the pedals.

So, if anyone is still reading at this point in my long post, feel free to
contribute your wisdom. What should I do?

Jerry Seutter

> I looked on unicycle.com today and saw that they have Suzue 28 hole hubs
> for sale. Does anyone know if this could be fitted on to an older Norco?
> My rim is a 28 hole, but I don’t know how wide the existing hub is.

Yes. Since you will be riding this new wheel until you can afford a
replacement unicycle, it doesn’t make sense to build one that won’t last
very long. Any wheel rebuild job should include new spokes and nipples.
Take the rim and new hub to a bike shop that knows what they’re doing, and
they can sell you the right size spokes (or build the wheel for you).

> The ones that I might be able to afford are the $179 United or the $279
> Semcycle XL. I would like to buy the cheaper United wheel, but I am
> concerned about strength as I am 185lbs, grew up on a farm, and have
> stronger than average legs. Is there any difference in the axle strength
> between these two wheels?

If you continue to ride on trails, you should probably aim higher than
either of these. I would start with a Pashley or a Semcycle Deluxe
Off-Road and work my way up from there. Unless you were looking at the Sem
XL with wide rim and Gazz tire. Every time I look at Unicycle.com they’ve
got a new combination of parts for us unicyclists! That looks like a great
one for somebody on a budget.

Leg strength usually isn’t a problem on broken unicycles, it’s more how
you land the drops, hops, and other moves that stress the cranks & axle.
But at your weight you will automatically be putting a strain on the
“typical street wheels” of the unicycles you listed.

The Semcycle XLW comes with a Suzue hub, which is one of the best
“regular” hubs out there.

Good luck, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“We’re fat…and old…and bald!” – Ken Krakat, on seeing me for the
first time in over 10 years, along with other former Redford unicyclist
Hans Mills

John Foss <john_foss@asinet.com> skrev i diskussionsgruppsmeddelandet:52C-
D02C3DAD2D411A3170002A528514206B807@SERVER… .
> > I looked on unicycle.com today and saw that they have Suzue 28 hole
> > hubs for sale. Does anyone know if this could be fitted on to an
> > older Norco? My rim is a 28 hole, but I don’t know how wide the
> > existing hub is.
>
> Yes. Since you will be riding this new wheel until you can afford a
> replacement unicycle, it doesn’t make sense to build one that won’t last
> very long. Any wheel rebuild job should include new spokes and nipples.
Take
> the rim and new hub to a bike shop that knows what they’re doing, and
> they can sell you the right size spokes (or build the wheel for you).

How good is your current rim? I’ve had very big problems finding a (strong
enough) 28 hole rim to replace my tacoed one. (All tips on finding one are
welcome) If your rim is “nearly dead”, and you want to be able to use your
uni a while longer, and also be able to exchange your rim if needed, it
might be worth buying a 36 hole Suzue hub and a new rim.

A new rim won’t cost very much, however if the rest of the uni is crap, it
might not be worth the extra expense if the money could be put on your
next uni instead.

(And we all dream about that next uni, don’t we?)

Happy unicycling! Staffan Palm Sweden

Jerry,

I have some extensive first hand use of the united unicycle. Here is
my review.

http://www.uni-psycho.cityslide.com/pages/page.cfm/739828

you might have to copy and paste that address. My site is at:

http://www.uni-psycho.cityslide.com

Goto Reviews. I strongly urge you to czech the whole site though.

Now as a personal recomendation just for YOU!

If you want to get into Trials or MUni, dont go with the United. Go with
something better. A Pashley sounds about right, and go with one of the
better models. You might not be dropping more than 4" now, but i went from
learning to dropping 4 FEET in only 6 months. I only wiegh 130 lbs, so im
getting away with it on the United. Im noticing only a very small amount
of disformity in the cranks, almost unnoticable.

Im putting on a 2.5" tire within a few days, and ill update the
rewive then.

Once again, if you plan to stick to light trails and on road, the United
is great for your cash, but if you want to get into trials and real MUni,
buy a better yike. Remeber to czech my syte and sign my book.

http://www.uni-psycho.cityslide.com

Thanks for listening,

Nick Cegelka

Pyrotechnick13@yahoo.com

NickLikesFire AIM

http://www.uni-psycho.cityslide.com

— yello <yello@home.com> wrote:
>
> snip
>
> I looked at new unicycles as well, for something that would last me a
> year or so until I can buy a good quality Muni. The ones that I might be
> able to afford are the $179 United or the $279 Semcycle XL. I would like
> to buy the cheaper United wheel, but I am concerned about strength as I
> am 185lbs,
> > grew up on a farm, and have stronger than average legs. Is there any
> > difference in the axle strength
> between
> > these two wheels? I’m not too worried about wheel strength because at
> > the moment I have problems going off a 4 inch drop (I’m not that good
> > yet . However I can exert quite a bit of force on the pedals.
> >
> > So, if anyone is still reading at this point in my long post, feel
> > free to contribute your wisdom. What should
> I
> > do?
> >
> > Jerry Seutter

Well, have more news on the dead Norco.

I took it apart yesterday. My brother, being a mechanical engineer was
scheming about replacing the axle in the hub. Upon closer inspection
however, I found that the frame is cracked on both sides, from the bottom
up through both boltholes that hold the lollipops in. I guess I really was
being hard on the thing. :slight_smile:

Thanks for all the suggestions about new unicycles. Mike King suggested
I talk to Darren Bedford in Canada about getting a Bedford unicycle.
Buying in Canada would avoid the exchange rate and import duties faced
when buying from unicycle.com, allowing me to put more money into the
actual unicycle.

Once again, thanks for all the help and suggestions. This newsgroup rocks!

Jerry Seutter

If you’re hanging out with Mike King (Calgary, Alberta), does that
mean you live in Canada? You don’t say in your posting. I’ll assume
you’re a Canuck.

There’s a Pashley distributor in Mississauga, Ontario that’ll ship to you,
but Pashleys come in 20" or 26", so if you’re looking for a 24" look
elsewhere. I don’t know the name of the guy, but Jeff Groves in our club
purchased his Pashley 26" from him, with great results.
http://www.pashley.co.uk/

Darren Bedford (Bedford_Unicycles@yahoo.ca) puts together his own brand.
Most of the Toronto Club uses his unicycles, which are great value for
money and pretty strong. He also sells Semcycles. More importantly, he’ll
make sure that the uni is assembled properly, unlike most bike shops. His
experience and depth of knowledge of what works on unis has been and
continues to be valuable to the Toronto Unicyclists.

I believe Darren may have a fix for your dead Norco, but maybe you should
just build something strong now?

Purchasing from within Canada will save you the duty and the killer
exchange rate.

Don_TaiATyahooDOTcoDOTuk but I live in Toronto
http://torontounicyclists.tripod.com

yello wrote:
>
> Well, have more news on the dead Norco.
>
> I took it apart yesterday. My brother, being a mechanical engineer was
> scheming about replacing the axle in the hub. Upon closer inspection
> however, I found that the frame is cracked on both sides, from the
> bottom up through both boltholes that hold the lollipops in. I guess I
> really was being hard on the thing.
>
> Thanks for all the suggestions about new unicycles. Mike King suggested
> I talk to Darren Bedford in Canada about getting a Bedford unicycle.
> Buying in Canada would avoid the exchange rate and import duties faced
> when buying from unicycle.com, allowing me to put more money into the
> actual unicycle.
>
> Once again, thanks for all the help and suggestions. This
> newsgroup rocks!
>
> Jerry Seutter

Yes, I live in Canada (Calgary, to be precise). I’m looking to stay with a
24" as that’s what everyone else around here rides.

After finding out that the frame is cracked on both sides that pretty much
killed any idea of fixing it. Instead what I’ll do is chop my seatpost
shorter and give the seat and post to my nephew, along with a quick
release so that he can learn on his dad’s unicycle. :slight_smile: He wants to learn
more than just about anything, so I’m eager to help him out. I hope that
maybe next year I’ll get him out on the trails around here…

But, I digress. I talked to my wife about it and we agreed that I could
get a new unicycle if I put off buying some other stuff for the time
being. I’ll be giving Darren a call sometime this week to see what he can
come up with.

It’s cool to hear from someone in Toronto. I was looking at John’s
pictures from NUC (which I believe is in Toronto) and thinking it would be
cool to show up for it some year. Mike has been working on getting people
riding here in Calgary, so who knows, maybe we’ll have enough riders for
some teams games someday.

Jerry Seutter

Yes, I live in Canada (Calgary, to be precise). I’m looking to stay with a
24" as that’s what everyone else around here rides.

After finding out that the frame is cracked on both sides that pretty much
killed any idea of fixing it. Instead what I’ll do is chop my seatpost
shorter and give the seat and post to my nephew, along with a quick
release so that he can learn on his dad’s unicycle. :slight_smile: He wants to learn
more than just about anything, so I’m eager to help him out. I hope that
maybe next year I’ll get him out on the trails around here…

But, I digress. I talked to my wife about it and we agreed that I could
get a new unicycle if I put off buying some other stuff for the time
being. I’ll be giving Darren a call sometime this week to see what he can
come up with.

It’s cool to hear from someone in Toronto. I was looking at John’s
pictures from NUC (which I believe is in Toronto) and thinking it would be
cool to show up for it some year. Mike has been working on getting people
riding here in Calgary, so who knows, maybe we’ll have enough riders for
some teams games someday.

Jerry Seutter

Yes, I live in Canada (Calgary, to be precise). I’m looking to stay with a
24" as that’s what everyone else around here rides.

After finding out that the frame is cracked on both sides that pretty much
killed any idea of fixing it. Instead what I’ll do is chop my seatpost
shorter and give the seat and post to my nephew, along with a quick
release so that he can learn on his dad’s unicycle. :slight_smile: He wants to learn
more than just about anything, so I’m eager to help him out. I hope that
maybe next year I’ll get him out on the trails around here…

But, I digress. I talked to my wife about it and we agreed that I could
get a new unicycle if I put off buying some other stuff for the time
being. I’ll be giving Darren a call sometime this week to see what he can
come up with.

It’s cool to hear from someone in Toronto. I was looking at John’s
pictures from NUC (which I believe is in Toronto) and thinking it would be
cool to show up for it some year. Mike has been working on getting people
riding here in Calgary, so who knows, maybe we’ll have enough riders for
some teams games someday.

Jerry Seutter

Yes, I live in Canada (Calgary, to be precise). I’m looking to stay with a
24" as that’s what everyone else around here rides.

After finding out that the frame is cracked on both sides that pretty much
killed any idea of fixing it. Instead what I’ll do is chop my seatpost
shorter and give the seat and post to my nephew, along with a quick
release so that he can learn on his dad’s unicycle. :slight_smile: He wants to learn
more than just about anything, so I’m eager to help him out. I hope that
maybe next year I’ll get him out on the trails around here…

But, I digress. I talked to my wife about it and we agreed that I could
get a new unicycle if I put off buying some other stuff for the time
being. I’ll be giving Darren a call sometime this week to see what he can
come up with.

It’s cool to hear from someone in Toronto. I was looking at John’s
pictures from NUC (which I believe is in Toronto) and thinking it would be
cool to show up for it some year. Mike has been working on getting people
riding here in Calgary, so who knows, maybe we’ll have enough riders for
some teams games someday.

Jerry Seutter

You can still fix your norco frame if you want to (read below ***)…

> After finding out that the frame is cracked on both sides that pretty
> much killed any idea of fixing it.

That sounds very familiar, but I found out my frame was cracked while
going down a small, easy set of stairs. Suddenly I was on a ultimate
wheel, holding the saddle and frame in my hand. Of course I didn’t make
it, but I somehow remained on my feet.

A onlooker asked me, really impessed, if I’ve been practising that trick
for a long time. When I, confused after loosing a saddle, just said no,
he nodded slightly and said slowly in a low voice:" I see… might take
you a while."


You don’t have to give up just yet, I’ve fixed my cracked cyclepro
frame. (I think all these cheap crapcycles are the same, just sold under
different brands) After reparing my frame, it was a LOT stronger than
the original.

Its not very hard, let me know if you want a description and pictures.
However, if you don’t have access to some good machinery, and thus
would be forced to pay someone else to do it for you, it’s probably
not worth it.

Staffan Palm Sweden

You can still fix your norco frame if you want to (read below ***)…

> After finding out that the frame is cracked on both sides that pretty
> much killed any idea of fixing it.

That sounds very familiar, but I found out my frame was cracked while
going down a small, easy set of stairs. Suddenly I was on a ultimate
wheel, holding the saddle and frame in my hand. Of course I didn’t make
it, but I somehow remained on my feet.

A onlooker asked me, really impessed, if I’ve been practising that trick
for a long time. When I, confused after loosing a saddle, just said no,
he nodded slightly and said slowly in a low voice:" I see… might take
you a while."


You don’t have to give up just yet, I’ve fixed my cracked cyclepro
frame. (I think all these cheap crapcycles are the same, just sold under
different brands) After reparing my frame, it was a LOT stronger than
the original.

Its not very hard, let me know if you want a description and pictures.
However, if you don’t have access to some good machinery, and thus
would be forced to pay someone else to do it for you, it’s probably
not worth it.

Staffan Palm Sweden

You can still fix your norco frame if you want to (read below ***)…

> After finding out that the frame is cracked on both sides that pretty
> much killed any idea of fixing it.

That sounds very familiar, but I found out my frame was cracked while
going down a small, easy set of stairs. Suddenly I was on a ultimate
wheel, holding the saddle and frame in my hand. Of course I didn’t make
it, but I somehow remained on my feet.

A onlooker asked me, really impessed, if I’ve been practising that trick
for a long time. When I, confused after loosing a saddle, just said no,
he nodded slightly and said slowly in a low voice:" I see… might take
you a while."


You don’t have to give up just yet, I’ve fixed my cracked cyclepro
frame. (I think all these cheap crapcycles are the same, just sold under
different brands) After reparing my frame, it was a LOT stronger than
the original.

Its not very hard, let me know if you want a description and pictures.
However, if you don’t have access to some good machinery, and thus
would be forced to pay someone else to do it for you, it’s probably
not worth it.

Staffan Palm Sweden

You can still fix your norco frame if you want to (read below ***)…

> After finding out that the frame is cracked on both sides that pretty
> much killed any idea of fixing it.

That sounds very familiar, but I found out my frame was cracked while
going down a small, easy set of stairs. Suddenly I was on a ultimate
wheel, holding the saddle and frame in my hand. Of course I didn’t make
it, but I somehow remained on my feet.

A onlooker asked me, really impessed, if I’ve been practising that trick
for a long time. When I, confused after loosing a saddle, just said no,
he nodded slightly and said slowly in a low voice:" I see… might take
you a while."


You don’t have to give up just yet, I’ve fixed my cracked cyclepro
frame. (I think all these cheap crapcycles are the same, just sold under
different brands) After reparing my frame, it was a LOT stronger than
the original.

Its not very hard, let me know if you want a description and pictures.
However, if you don’t have access to some good machinery, and thus
would be forced to pay someone else to do it for you, it’s probably
not worth it.

Staffan Palm Sweden

You can still fix your norco frame if you want to (read below ***)…

> After finding out that the frame is cracked on both sides that pretty
> much killed any idea of fixing it.

That sounds very familiar, but I found out my frame was cracked while
going down a small, easy set of stairs. Suddenly I was on a ultimate
wheel, holding the saddle and frame in my hand. Of course I didn’t make
it, but I somehow remained on my feet.

A onlooker asked me, really impessed, if I’ve been practising that trick
for a long time. When I, confused after loosing a saddle, just said no,
he nodded slightly and said slowly in a low voice:" I see… might take
you a while."


You don’t have to give up just yet, I’ve fixed my cracked cyclepro
frame. (I think all these cheap crapcycles are the same, just sold under
different brands) After reparing my frame, it was a LOT stronger than
the original.

Its not very hard, let me know if you want a description and pictures.
However, if you don’t have access to some good machinery, and thus
would be forced to pay someone else to do it for you, it’s probably
not worth it.

Staffan Palm Sweden

Don Tai wrote:

> There’s a Pashley distributor in Mississauga, Ontario that’ll ship to
> you, but Pashleys come in 20" or 26", so if you’re looking for a 24"
> look elsewhere. I don’t know the name of the guy, but Jeff Groves in our
> club purchased his Pashley 26" from him, with great results.
> http://www.pashley.co.uk/

Do you know if he sells any other unicycle parts? I just broke my axle and
was hoping
to find another Canadian (yes, I too live in Calgary) distributor for the
Suzue hub.

> Darren Bedford (Bedford_Unicycles@yahoo.ca) puts together his own brand.
> Most of the Toronto Club uses his unicycles, which are great value for
> money and pretty strong. He also sells Semcycles. More importantly,
> he’ll make sure that the uni is assembled properly, unlike most bike
> shops. His experience and depth of knowledge of what works on unis has
> been and continues to be valuable to the Toronto Unicyclists.

I will definitely call Darren also. If anyone knows any other good places
to get unicycle
parts in Canada, please let me know. I seem to be going through a lot
lately.

Brad Davis,
davis (at) enel (dot) ucalgary (dot) ca (dot) nothin