observation on hopping

I hadn’t ridden my unicycle in over a week (eek!) when I decided to ride
around campus tonight. Eventually, I came up on a bench, and decided to
try hopping onto it. Mind you, by previous attempts, I’d only made it onto
benches of this height with my 24x3.0" tire… today, I was riding on a
20x1.75". Well, I decided I should try anyway. I took a few practice hops
next to the bench, each of them missing the bench by at least 4". For
some reason, I decided that if I just tried to get onto the bench,
I’d make it. I figured, either I’d fall, or have modivation to jump
higher, and not fall. With the modivation of possibly getting hurt if
I failed, I made it onto the bench on my first try. I think that just
says you’re not going to reach a goal unless you are trying directly
for that goal. Shooting for something close is not as likley to get
you there.

The other thing I found very odd was that I’d not been practicing any
trials sort of stuff for at least a month, maybe longer. This seems to
be how a lot of tricks work for me. I’ll work on it, until I understand
how it’s done, and can do it some of the time. Then I’ll move onto
something completely different. Then, when I remember what I was
working on previously, I’ll try it, and get meet much greater success
than ever before.

It’s just a shame this same logic doesn’t apply to coding.

Jeff Lutkus

Sent via the Unicyclist Community - http://Unicyclist.com

> completely different. Then, when I remember what I was working on
> previously, I’ll try it, and get meet much greater success than ever
before.

Evidently the optimum strategy is to learn what you’re supposed to do by
watching others, practice for a few minutes to give your brain some
empirical data to stir into the theory, and then retire to the pub for a
fortnight while your skills improve. I reckon I could manage that.

A pity the effect is absent where Coker mounting is concerned…

As for the coding, speak for yourself ;).

Arnold the Aardvark

British Unicycle Convention 9: Kidderminster, 19-21 April 2002