New seat designs

I think you hit the nail on the head. I’m very happy with the Roach/air
pillow/Carbon Fiber/Miyata combination, but it takes some work to put it
together, and street riders don’t need the suspension effect that it offers.
Maybe a real seat company could make a similar product that’s one piece.

Chris

> Although I don’t do MUni (right now) I’m very interested in seat design. I can
> imagine that a perfect MUni seat might not be a perfect Coker seat or a
> perfect freestyle seat. So do we need ideas for more than one design for
> different styles of riding or an “all around good seat” or just ideas for a
> good MUni seat? Also maybe more than one different size for different size
> people? -Mark
>
> _____________________________________________________________
> Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

I like the like the smooth shallow, rounded shape of the viscount for quickly
getting where you want to be on the saddle but it loses out in comfort to
innertube/gel custom saddles. But i find my custom saddle too tall, wobbly and
unpredictable - it never keeps the same shape so you don’t slip into the best
position as easily. I think if this is going to be a serious project it needs
serious anatomical (which probably isn’t available). or imperiacal research.

Re: New seat designs

— Kris Holm <danger_uni@yahoo.com>
> wrote: I was just at a big trade show in Las Vegas (Interbike), and the owner
> of Velo (one of the biggest bike saddle manufactures in the world) has agreed
> to make a new prototype uni seat. We just need to send her a detailed sketch
> of what we want (ideas/sketches welcom!). Do you think it might be possible to
> make a seat that has a gap in the middle like some modern bike seats?

Although I don’t do MUni (right now) I’m very interested in seat design. I can
imagine that a perfect MUni seat might not be a perfect Coker seat or a
perfect freestyle seat. So do we need ideas for more than one design for
different styles of riding or an “all around good seat” or just ideas for a
good MUni seat? Also maybe more than one different size for different size
people? -Mark


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

RE: New seat designs

> The rear cinch strap on the Roach cover seems very effective. On my air pillow
> seat I replaced the forward elastic with six eyelets, but I left the rear
> cinch strap in place. When I hop seat out in front, I grab the right rear
> quadrant of the seat. The shoelace is never in the way because it only covers
> the front two quadrants of the seat. Is this where most people grab the seat?

My main handhold for seat in front is to hold alongside the seat post, or
rearward from there. For seat in back, I"d be holding the front bumper so laces
wouldn’t matter.

jf

Re: New seat designs

Hi all,

Ideally several seat designs might be desirable, but since we currently cannot
buy even ONE type of good seat (without significant modifications), perhaps we
should just work on one good one to start with.

-Kris.

— Neil dunlop <neild@roachmill.demon.co.uk> wrote:
> Mark - you’re bang on me thinks!
>
> What say we aim for the sky to start with… and we might end up with a great
> seat that doesn’t require tubes, gel pads, sewing machines and the like to get
> a vaguely comfortable butt pedestal. What are the categories we’re looking at
> - MUni, street, freestyle and long distance?
>
> I think we need to identify what each kind of seat should have for each
> purpose. I’m not the one to come up with the ideal design for a seat but to
> try and get a ball rolling here’s some blatantly vaugue ideas:
>
> MUni and street both need strength. MUni, street and freestyle all want a
> good handle - since long distance is mainly the field of Cokers a handle
> probably ain’t required? Bumpers front and back for all. Tougher for MUni and
> street? All should be comfortable. Hey - I can state the obvious as well as
> anybody :wink: Thigh friendly covers for long distance riding and tougher one
> for the rest.
>
> Some kind of component based design where everything is interchangable could
> be good. You could have seat bases with varying strengths / weights. To this
> you pick your padding, a choice of coloured covering and then your bumpers -
> with or without a handle.
>
> Neil
>
> “Mark Stephens” <Cokerhead@unicyclist.com> wrote in message
>
news:20001004185255.175BD2747@sitemail.everyone.net
> >
> >
> > — Kris Holm <danger_uni@yahoo.com>
> > > wrote: I was just at a big trade show in Las Vegas (Interbike), and the
> > > owner of Velo (one of the
> biggest
> > >bike saddle manufactures in the world) has agreed
> to
> > >make a new prototype uni seat. We just need to
> send
> > >her a detailed sketch of what we want
> (ideas/sketches
> > >welcom!). Do you think it might be possible to
> make a
> > >seat that has a gap in the middle like some
> modern
> > >bike seats?
> >
> > Although I don’t do MUni (right now) I’m very
> interested in seat design. I can imagine that a perfect MUni seat might not
> be a perfect Coker seat or a perfect freestyle seat. So do we need ideas
> for more than one design for different styles of riding or an "all around good
> seat" or just ideas for a good MUni seat? Also maybe more than one different
> size for different size people?
> > -Mark
> >
> >
>


> > Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com
>
>


Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos - 35mm Quality Prints, Now Get 15 Free!
http://photos.yahoo.com/

Re: New seat designs

— Kris Holm <danger_uni@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
> Hi all,
>
>Ideally several seat designs might be desirable, but since we currently cannot
>buy even ONE type of good seat (without significant modifications), perhaps we
>should just work on one good one to start with.
>
>-Kris.

Understandable. Sorry if I got carried away. Just the thought of a “new” seat is
pretty exciting!


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

RE: New seat designs

Having had a hand in the design of the Viscount seat, I’m interested in helping
“get it right” on the next big upgrade. Though a big improvement over the old
Schwinn design it replaced, I never found the Viscount to be very comfortable.
It came out more or less as it was intended, as a durable knockoff of the Miyata
seat, retaining the popular Schwinn shape.

> MUni and street both need strength. MUni, street and freestyle all want a good
> handle since long distance is mainly the field of Cokers a handle probably
> ain’t required? Bumpers front and back for all. Tougher for MUni and street?
> All should be comfortable. Hey - I can state the obvious as well as anybody

Though there are variations on what different people will consider the ultimate
seat, every unicycle seat in use today was designed for general use. I don’t
think we need specialized ones as much as simply a better version of what
already exists. However, ultimately there will be at least two sizes.

Everybody wants:

  • Strength (in the seat and post)
  • Bumpers
  • Handle (some freestylers find handle gets in the way)
  • COMFORT

I believe the future for unicycling will be in modular designs. Right now,
everything is proprietary and different brands are using different post
diameters and tops. A modular design will be compatible with a maximum number of
other things, and will be able to fit a maximum number of existing unicycles.

RAILS: Several experts have suggested using standard seat rails. I believe this
has advantages and disadvantages. The main reported advantage is compatibility
with existing seat post products. This is useful for suspension seat posts, but
I’m not sure how important beyond that. All these extra parts (rails, multi-part
post tops). Are they necessary?

Another advantage to rails is one that I don’t think has been mentioned. For me,
the weakest part of my (Miyata) seats over the years has been where the seat
post attaches to the plate at the top. This area undergoes lots of strain both
up and down, and eventually cracks and breaks. A rail system would absorb these
stresses, and probably would not break down in this area. This would save the
extra metal I’ve had to use in my own custom posts, to keep the seats rigid.

The disadvantage of course is the extra components required in the whole
seat/post setup. The seat part might not be a problem if the seat is being
produced by a company that already puts the same rails on everything else. But
it’s still more parts, and labor to assemble them. The posts that attach to the
rails are also more complex than what we’re used to. Rail-type posts have a bolt
and multiple parts at the top, compared to the traditional piece of straight
pipe for a unicycle.

For the long term though, I think rails might be the way to go, as long as they
can hold up to the extra stresses we put on the fronts of our seats.

STRENGTH: Whatever we specify, it should be designed to withstand heavy duty
adult use. We expect this will be a high-end seat, and should hold up to
high-end riders. This means a base that is tough and rigid, yet not too heavy.

BUMPERS: Gotta have bumpers, something to protect the seat from all those drops.
Viscount bumpers are weak, and fall off. Miyata bumpers used to crack in the
cold, but I don’t know if that’s still the case. I’m sure it’s possible to find
the appropriate material from which to mold them. The stuff used for inline
skate wheels would probably work great, though maybe that’s too expensive.

Don’t let the bolts or screws interfere with the bumper’s use as a handle. The
Viscount front bumper only allows for two fingers between it; unacceptable. The
big Miyata handle is great, and eliminates this problem. Watch out for tight
spaces where fingers can get caught or pinched.

Bumpers should either come in different colors, or be a non-garish neutral color
that people won’t hate. The original Miyata seat bumpers were black, just like
most bike seats. This goes with anything.

HANDLE: The big Miyata front handle gets in the way of some Freestyle tricks.
Some freestylers have cut the handle off to get it out of the way. The best
solution here is to hopefully offer an alternate front bumper without the
handle, as an accessory. The vast majority of users find the handle great. I
lean on mine constantly while riding, especially long distance or trails.

COMFORT: If it’s not comfortable, nobody will like it. Research among
unicyclists seems to have converged on air seats, with either foam or gel as a
supplement. The seat should have air, or be easily converted to air. There has
to be either some foam or some gel along with any air bladder, to get you home
in the event of a flat. Keep the inflation method simple, by using a common
innertube, so it’s cheap and easy to replace when that happens.

COVER: There should be a removable seat cover, to allow people to adjust the
contents to taste. Some will want to add or change what’s in there. The cover is
also the part that wears out the fastest on Miyata seats, so by being removable
it is also replaceable. Different colors would be nice. The material should of
course be indestructible but friendly to lots of leg friction.

HOLE? Should there be a hole in the seat? Bicycle seats have been made with
holes since the 1880s, but a recent interest in tissue damage has brought that
area of seat design back into the spotlight. I think two ridges will work better
than a hole, and be easier to manufacture while producing the same effect. Then
we get into the issue of figuring out how far apart those ridges should be…
And we can’t necessarily use bike seats as an example, because you sit on a
unicycle seat with your pelvic structure at a different angle.

SIZES: I’m pretty sure kids still outnumber adults in unicycle use. By a lot.
How have we all been fitting onto the same seats all these years? There should
be at least two sizes. If this happens, we can in the future think about female
vs. male designs (like bike seats).

POSTS: With a modular attachment method, all you need is the correct diameter
post to fit your unicycle’s frame. But modularity also allows for a wide range
of specialized designs. Here are a few that come to mind:

  • Standard straight post (aluminum or alloy)
  • Suspension post
  • With brake mount
  • With computer mount
  • With water bottle mount
  • With reinforced handle (instead of front of seat)
  • With toolbag mount
  • Combinations of the above

Without going into detail on shape or other specifics, there’s my two cents.
Does that stir up any controversy or additional discussion?

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

“In the walk of life sometimes you are a dog, and sometimes you are a hydrant.”

  • Anonymous

RE: New seat designs

John,

Good comments. Would you have time to make a sketch (or anyone else for that
matter), that I could submit to Velo?

My thought is that I would submit the sketch along with my seat rail system.

-Kris.

— John Foss <john_foss@asinet.com> wrote:
> Having had a hand in the design of the Viscount seat, I’m interested in
> helping “get it right” on the next big upgrade. Though a big improvement over
> the old Schwinn design it replaced, I never found the Viscount to be very
> comfortable. It came out more or less as it was intended, as a durable
> knockoff of the Miyata seat, retaining the popular Schwinn shape.
>
> > MUni and street both need strength. MUni, street and freestyle all want a
> > good handle since long distance is mainly the field of Cokers
> a handle
> > probably ain’t required? Bumpers front and back for all. Tougher for MUni
> and street?
> > All should be comfortable. Hey - I can state the
> obvious as
> > well as anybody
>
> Though there are variations on what different people will consider the
> ultimate seat, every unicycle seat in use today was designed for general use.
> I don’t think we need specialized ones as much as simply a better version of
> what already exists. However, ultimately there will be at least two sizes.
>
> Everybody wants:
> - Strength (in the seat and post)
> - Bumpers
> - Handle (some freestylers find handle gets in the way)
> - COMFORT
>
> I believe the future for unicycling will be in modular designs. Right now,
> everything is proprietary and different brands are using different post
> diameters and tops. A modular design will be compatible with a maximum number
> of other things, and will be able to fit a maximum number of existing
> unicycles.
>
> RAILS: Several experts have suggested using standard seat rails. I believe
> this has advantages and disadvantages. The main reported advantage is
> compatibility with existing seat post products. This is useful for suspension
> seat posts, but I’m not sure how important beyond that. All these extra parts
> (rails, multi-part post tops). Are they necessary?
>
> Another advantage to rails is one that I don’t think has been mentioned. For
> me, the weakest part of my (Miyata) seats over the years has been where the
> seat post attaches to the plate at the top. This area undergoes lots of
> strain both up and down, and eventually cracks and breaks. A rail system
> would absorb these stresses, and probably would not break down in this area.
> This would save the extra metal I’ve had to use in my own custom posts, to
> keep the seats rigid.
>
> The disadvantage of course is the extra components required in the whole
> seat/post setup. The seat part might not be a problem if the seat is being
> produced by a company that already puts the same rails on everything else. But
> it’s still more parts, and labor to assemble them. The posts that attach to
> the rails are also more complex than what we’re used to. Rail-type posts have
> a bolt and multiple parts at the top, compared to the traditional piece of
> straight pipe for a unicycle.
>
> For the long term though, I think rails might be the way to go, as long as
> they can hold up to the extra stresses we put on the fronts of our seats.
>
> STRENGTH: Whatever we specify, it should be designed to withstand heavy duty
> adult use. We expect this will be a high-end seat, and should hold up to
> high-end riders. This means a base that is tough and rigid, yet not too heavy.
>
> BUMPERS: Gotta have bumpers, something to protect the seat from all those
> drops. Viscount bumpers are weak, and fall off. Miyata bumpers used to crack
> in the cold, but I don’t know if that’s still the case. I’m sure it’s possible
> to find the appropriate material from which to mold them. The stuff used for
> inline skate wheels would probably work great, though maybe that’s too
> expensive.
>
> Don’t let the bolts or screws interfere with the bumper’s use as a handle. The
> Viscount front bumper only allows for two fingers between it; unacceptable.
> The big Miyata handle is great, and eliminates this problem. Watch out for
> tight spaces where fingers can get caught or pinched.
>
> Bumpers should either come in different colors, or be a non-garish neutral
> color that people won’t hate. The original Miyata seat bumpers were black,
> just like most bike seats. This goes with anything.
>
> HANDLE: The big Miyata front handle gets in the way of some Freestyle tricks.
> Some freestylers have cut the handle off to get it out of the way. The best
> solution here is to hopefully offer an alternate front bumper without the
> handle, as an accessory. The vast majority of users find the handle great. I
> lean on mine constantly while riding, especially long distance or trails.
>
> COMFORT: If it’s not comfortable, nobody will like it. Research among
> unicyclists seems to have converged on air seats, with either foam or gel as a
> supplement. The seat should have air, or be easily converted to air. There has
> to be either some foam or some gel along with any air bladder, to get you home
> in the event of a flat. Keep the inflation method simple, by using a common
> innertube, so it’s cheap and easy to replace when that happens.
>
> COVER: There should be a removable seat cover, to allow people to adjust the
> contents to taste. Some will want to add or change what’s in there. The cover
> is also the part that wears out the fastest on Miyata seats, so by being
> removable it is also replaceable. Different colors would be nice. The material
> should of course be indestructible but friendly to lots of leg friction.
>
> HOLE? Should there be a hole in the seat? Bicycle seats have been made with
> holes since the 1880s, but a recent interest in tissue damage has brought that
> area of seat design back into the spotlight. I think two ridges will work
> better than a hole, and be easier to manufacture while producing the same
> effect. Then we get into the issue of figuring out how far apart those ridges
> should be… And we can’t necessarily use bike seats as an example, because
> you sit on a unicycle seat with your pelvic structure at a different angle.
>
> SIZES: I’m pretty sure kids still outnumber adults in unicycle use. By a lot.
> How have we all been fitting onto the same seats all these years? There should
> be at least two sizes. If this happens, we can in the future think about
> female vs. male designs (like bike seats).
>
> POSTS: With a modular attachment method, all you need is the correct diameter
> post to fit your unicycle’s frame. But modularity also allows for a wide range
> of specialized designs. Here are a few that come to mind:
>
=== message truncated ===


Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos - 35mm Quality Prints, Now Get 15 Free!
http://photos.yahoo.com/

Re: New seat designs

— Carl Hoyer <choyer@i-d-g.com> wrote:
>
> One thing about my current seats (the viscount and a no-name, but not too bad
> seat) is that grabbing them on the side is very uncomfortable and my fingers
> are usually very sore afterwards. I hope the Miyata seat is a little bit more
> comfortable on my hands.
>

Actually I think the Viscount is more comfortable than the Miyata (or
carbonfibre) seats for grabbing on the side, unfortunately! Luckily there is an
easy solution: get about a 10cm length of 1cm diameter rubber hose, and split it
lengthwise. Slip this over the edge of the bottom of the seat where you grab it
(either left or right quadrant). Glue or Duct-tape it in place. This creates a
rounded edge that’s comfortable to grab.

Cheers,

Kris.


Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos - 35mm Quality Prints, Now Get 15 Free!
http://photos.yahoo.com/

RE: New seat designs

I think that seat rails are an important addition to any new design. They
needn’t be over complicated - most high end MTB seats have a single allen key
bolt that adjusts the seat angle and front-back positioning. The adjustable
angle could be an advantage for unicycling, because it would allow a rider to
change exactly where the body pressure is supported. Also, if the rails extend
to the front and back of the seat, as in bike seats, they will offer some
suspension effect, since the seat will flex a little bit. This could turn out to
be a disadvantage.

Also, the bolts underneat the Viscount seat are a real pain (literally). The
first time I miscaught my seat, and some friends’ seats, I cut my hands on the
bolts. This should never have been an issue, but because they are close to the
seat post, and stick down a lot, they become quite dangerous.

Finally, seat rails will make it a lot easier to get a seat post that matches a
rider’s height. Offhand, I seem to recall that MTB posts with the integrated
seatrail clamp at the top are designed to be set at an angle. This could be a
bit of a problem, but since the seat angle is adjustable, it should be OK.

Of course, this new seat isn’t going to be cheap! I recently bought a new, cheap
MTB seat post. It cost about $40, which is only slightly less than an entire
Viscount seat and post.

nic

Re: New seat designs

It just fits along the bare edge of the bottom right quadrant of the seat
frame, to round off this edge a bit. I suppose the seatcover would go over top
of the tube.

— Chris Reeder <reed8990@uidaho.edu> wrote:
> Does the hose go under the seat cover, over the seat cover, or what?
>
> Chris
>
>
> On Fri, 6 Oct 2000, Kris Holm wrote:
>
> > — Carl Hoyer <choyer@i-d-g.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > One thing about my current seats (the viscount
> and a
> > > no-name, but not too bad seat) is that grabbing them on the side
> is
> > > very uncomfortable and my fingers are usually very sore afterwards.
> I
> > > hope the Miyata seat is a little bit more comfortable on my hands.
> > >
> >
> > Actually I think the Viscount is more comfortable
> than
> > the Miyata (or carbonfibre) seats for grabbing on
> the
> > side, unfortunately! Luckily there is an easy solution: get about a 10cm
> > length of 1cm diameter rubber hose, and split it lengthwise. Slip this
> over
> > the edge of the bottom of the seat where you grab
> it
> > (either left or right quadrant). Glue or Duct-tape
> it
> > in place. This creates a rounded edge that’s comfortable to grab.
> >
> > Cheers,
> >
> > Kris.
> >
> > __________________________________________________
> > Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos - 35mm Quality Prints, Now Get 15
> Free!
> > http://photos.yahoo.com/
> >
>


Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos - 35mm Quality Prints, Now Get 15 Free!
http://photos.yahoo.com/

Re: [RE: New seat designs]

Greg House <ghouse@southwind.net> wrote: On Thu, 05 Oct 2000, Nicholas
Price wrote:

>Also, the bolts underneat the Viscount seat are a real pain (literally). The
>first time I miscaught my seat, and some friends’ seats, I cut my hands on the
>bolts. This should never have been an issue, but because they are close to the
>seat post, and stick down a lot, they become quite dangerous.

I’ve had that problem too. I considered getting some plastic acorn nuts to cover
them up so the sharp edges on the bolts aren’t the first thing your hand hits.
I’ve seen these on kids bikes, but I haven’t found any yet…

Most hardware stores have metal nuts which are covered (they are like normal
nuts with a half sphere attached). You may need to put a normal nut or a few
washers on as spacers as obviously the covered nuts don’t screw on too far.

I’ve found this to work well on my seats and it certainly saves your fingers.
Another possibility is trying to find some rubber valve covers that will fit
the bolts.

Peter

o o Peter Bier o O o Juggler, unicyclist and mathematician.
o/|\o peter_bier@usa.net


Get free email and a permanent address at http://www.netaddress.com/?N=1

Re: New seat designs

Mark - you’re bang on me thinks!

What say we aim for the sky to start with… and we might end up with a great
seat that doesn’t require tubes, gel pads, sewing machines and the like to get a
vaguely comfortable butt pedestal. What are the categories we’re looking at -
MUni, street, freestyle and long distance?

I think we need to identify what each kind of seat should have for each purpose.
I’m not the one to come up with the ideal design for a seat but to try and get a
ball rolling here’s some blatantly vaugue ideas:

MUni and street both need strength. MUni, street and freestyle all want a good
handle - since long distance is mainly the field of Cokers a handle probably
ain’t required? Bumpers front and back for all. Tougher for MUni and street? All
should be comfortable. Hey - I can state the obvious as well as anybody :wink:
Thigh friendly covers for long distance riding and tougher one for the rest.

Some kind of component based design where everything is interchangable could be
good. You could have seat bases with varying strengths / weights. To this you
pick your padding, a choice of coloured covering and then your bumpers - with or
without a handle.

Neil

“Mark Stephens” <Cokerhead@unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:20001004185255.175BD2747@sitemail.everyone.net
>
>
> — Kris Holm <danger_uni@yahoo.com>
> > wrote: I was just at a big trade show in Las Vegas (Interbike), and the
> > owner of Velo (one of the biggest bike saddle manufactures in the world) has
> > agreed to make a new prototype uni seat. We just need to send her a detailed
> > sketch of what we want (ideas/sketches welcom!). Do you think it might be
> > possible to make a seat that has a gap in the middle like some modern bike
> > seats?
>
> Although I don’t do MUni (right now) I’m very interested in seat design.
I can imagine that a perfect MUni seat might not be a perfect Coker seat or
a perfect freestyle seat. So do we need ideas for more than one design for
different styles of riding or an “all around good seat” or just ideas for a good
MUni seat? Also maybe more than one different size for different size people?
> -Mark
>
> _____________________________________________________________
> Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

Re: New seat designs

A new seat should mount on rails instead of the current method.

Freestyle riders would rather not have a Miyata type handle on the seat, but
flat bumpers as on older Miyata seats. These are easily interchangable if they
are available.

John Hooten

Kris Holm wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> Ideally several seat designs might be desirable, but since we currently cannot
> buy even ONE type of good seat (without significant modifications), perhaps we
> should just work on one good one to start with.
>
> -Kris.
>
> — Neil dunlop <neild@roachmill.demon.co.uk> wrote:
> > Mark - you’re bang on me thinks!
> >
> > What say we aim for the sky to start with… and we might end up with a
> > great seat that doesn’t require tubes, gel pads, sewing machines and the
> > like to get a vaguely comfortable butt pedestal. What are the categories
> > we’re looking at - MUni, street, freestyle and long distance?
> >
> > I think we need to identify what each kind of seat should have for each
> > purpose. I’m not the one to come up with the ideal design for a seat but to
> > try and get a ball rolling here’s some blatantly vaugue ideas:
> >
> > MUni and street both need strength. MUni, street and freestyle all want a
> > good handle - since long distance is mainly the field of Cokers a handle
> > probably ain’t required? Bumpers front and back for all. Tougher for MUni
> > and street? All should be comfortable. Hey - I can state the obvious as well
> > as anybody :wink: Thigh friendly covers for long distance riding and tougher
> > one for the rest.
> >
> > Some kind of component based design where everything is interchangable could
> > be good. You could have seat bases with varying strengths / weights. To this
> > you pick your padding, a choice of coloured covering and then your bumpers -
> > with or without a handle.
> >
> > Neil
> >
> > “Mark Stephens” <Cokerhead@unicyclist.com> wrote in message
> >
> news:20001004185255.175BD2747@sitemail.everyone.net
> > >
> > >
> > > — Kris Holm <danger_uni@yahoo.com>
> > > > wrote: I was just at a big trade show in Las Vegas (Interbike), and the
> > > > owner of Velo (one of the
> > biggest
> > > >bike saddle manufactures in the world) has agreed
> > to
> > > >make a new prototype uni seat. We just need to
> > send
> > > >her a detailed sketch of what we want
> > (ideas/sketches
> > > >welcom!). Do you think it might be possible to
> > make a
> > > >seat that has a gap in the middle like some
> > modern
> > > >bike seats?
> > >
> > > Although I don’t do MUni (right now) I’m very
> > interested in seat design. I can imagine that a perfect MUni seat might
> > not be a perfect Coker seat or a perfect freestyle seat. So do we need
> > ideas for more than one design for different styles of riding or an "all
> > around good seat" or just ideas for a good MUni seat? Also maybe more than
> > one different size for different size people?
> > > -Mark
> > >
> > >
> >
> _____________________________________________________________
> > > Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com
> >
> >
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos - 35mm Quality Prints, Now Get 15 Free!
> http://photos.yahoo.com/

Re: New seat designs

Watch out here comes another opinion… or it might turn out into a question…
lets see…

I think the idea of a component based design with interchangable parts is a good
one for 1 or 2 or 3 or more reasons i.e. I’ll make them up as I go along:

People all want something slightly different in their ideal seat e.g. I
certainly want a handle on my bumper, Mark Hooten doesn’t. This is hardly a
comprehensive poll but this is a new thread. A manufacturer (at my guess) may
well like the idea of being able to use some of the same components to comprise
a different product which appeals to a different buyer. Kris - you’ve confabed
with manufacturers I believe - you probably can corrrect me on this. In my
original post I said we should aim for the stars / sky / whatever. Invariable in
any kind of negotiations you end up compromising and coming out with less than
you origianlly would’ve liked. So we may very well end up with a single design
of seat but we’d have more bargaining power on getting it how we want. Erm… no

  • I’m not a power crazed looney. Anyone who says so will be crushed and their
    remains ffed to my dogs :wink:

Hmmm… I’ll stop there (he lied).

So how do we, as a group, deside on exactly what we want? What about some kind
of voting / questionaire on a web site where anyone can play their part? When
the result are in - the specifics of design can begin. Me thinks I’m maybe
getting ahead of myself. I’d be happy to leave it to the likes of Kris to come
up with the design as I imagine it’s what I’d want anyway. But… the more
interest, the more hastle but the better the end result.

It’s late, Neil

“Kris Holm” <danger_uni@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:20001005181929.19174.qmail@web903.mail.yahoo.com
> Hi all,
>
> Ideally several seat designs might be desirable, but since we currently cannot
> buy even ONE type of good seat (without significant modifications), perhaps we
> should just work on one good one to start with.
>
> -Kris.
>
>
> — Neil dunlop <neild@roachmill.demon.co.uk> wrote:
> > Mark - you’re bang on me thinks!
> >
> > What say we aim for the sky to start with… and we might end up with a
> > great seat that doesn’t require tubes, gel pads, sewing machines and the
> > like to get a vaguely comfortable butt pedestal. What are the categories
> > we’re looking at - MUni, street, freestyle and long distance?
> >
> > I think we need to identify what each kind of seat should have for each
> > purpose. I’m not the one to come up with the ideal design for a seat but to
> > try and get a ball rolling here’s some blatantly vaugue ideas:
> >
> > MUni and street both need strength. MUni, street and freestyle all want a
> > good handle - since long distance is mainly the field of Cokers a handle
> > probably ain’t required? Bumpers front and back for all. Tougher for MUni
> > and street? All should be comfortable. Hey - I can state the obvious as well
> > as anybody :wink: Thigh friendly covers for long distance riding and tougher
> > one for the rest.
> >
> > Some kind of component based design where everything is interchangable could
> > be good. You could have seat bases with varying strengths / weights. To this
> > you pick your padding, a choice of coloured covering and then your bumpers -
> > with or without a handle.
> >
> > Neil
> >
> > “Mark Stephens” <Cokerhead@unicyclist.com> wrote in message
> >
> news:20001004185255.175BD2747@sitemail.everyone.net
> > >
> > >
> > > — Kris Holm <danger_uni@yahoo.com>
> > > > wrote: I was just at a big trade show in Las Vegas (Interbike), and the
> > > > owner of Velo (one of the
> > biggest
> > > >bike saddle manufactures in the world) has agreed
> > to
> > > >make a new prototype uni seat. We just need to
> > send
> > > >her a detailed sketch of what we want
> > (ideas/sketches
> > > >welcom!). Do you think it might be possible to
> > make a
> > > >seat that has a gap in the middle like some
> > modern
> > > >bike seats?
> > >
> > > Although I don’t do MUni (right now) I’m very
> > interested in seat design. I can imagine that a perfect MUni seat might
> > not be a perfect Coker seat or a perfect freestyle seat. So do we need
> > ideas for more than one design for different styles of riding or an "all
> > around good seat" or just ideas for a good MUni seat? Also maybe more than
> > one different size for different size people?
> > > -Mark
> > >
> > >
> >
> _____________________________________________________________
> > > Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com
> >
> >
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos - 35mm Quality Prints, Now Get 15 Free!
> http://photos.yahoo.com/

Re: New seat designs

Nicholas Price wrote:
> Also, the bolts underneat the Viscount seat are a real pain (literally). The
> first time I miscaught my seat, and some friends’ seats, I cut my hands on the
> bolts. This should never have been an issue, but because they are close to the
> seat post, and stick down a lot, they become quite dangerous.

At least you still have your bumpers and the bolts that hold them in place :slight_smile:
Albeit, I’ve been pretty rough on my viscount, the front bumper fell off on my
first MUni ride and it wasn’t that hard a fall. I’m currently riding without a
front and rear bumper on the viscount (as they’ve both fallen off countless
times) and find it to be much easier on the hands. (I know it’s really tough on
the cover, I haven’t had the time to make a trip to the hardware store, again,
to pick up some screws that will fit. It’s definitely not the ideal situation!)

I have my first Miyata seat on the way with a roach cover and the Kris
Holm-designed rail-type seat post bracket, so I’ll probably have more to say
about seat design once I’ve got that all setup and in use.

One thing about my current seats (the viscount and a no-name, but not too bad
seat) is that grabbing them on the side is very uncomfortable and my fingers are
usually very sore afterwards. I hope the Miyata seat is a little bit more
comfortable on my hands.

Carl

RE: New seat designs

I’ve always suspected that those bicycle seats with a hole down the middle were
a gimmick, and not that effective - but I must admit that I have never tried
one. I prefer the Brooks B17.

I can’t see how one of those “anatomically friendly” seats would work on a
unicycle. I would expect that any hole or relief in the soft cushion would
simply disappear once that you sit on it - your weight is really going to
squeeze everything together right there. On a bicycle seat most of your weight
is on your “sit bones”, and if your seat is adjusted properly very little weight
is on the nose of the seat. But on a unicycle seat most of your weight is right
in the middle and I would suspect that no matter what the design is, there is
going to be pressure there where you don’t want it.

Most unicycles may be ridden by youngsters, but I think we are discussing a high
performance after-market seat here, and I would suggest that the design be
tailored to fit the needs of serious riders: freestyle and MUni, rather than
trying to come up with something that would be standard equipment on Taiwanese
unicycles.

I agree that rails are the way to go for mounting the seat to the seat post.
Titanium rails would be cool. The handle in front should be designed so that a
brake lever can be mounted under it. The seat cover definitely has to be
removable to make it easy to replace if damaged and also to allow people to
customize their cushions if they want.

-Rick

Re: New seat designs

Does the hose go under the seat cover, over the seat cover, or what?

Chris

On Fri, 6 Oct 2000, Kris Holm wrote:

> — Carl Hoyer <choyer@i-d-g.com> wrote:
> >
> > One thing about my current seats (the viscount and a no-name, but not too
> > bad seat) is that grabbing them on the side is very uncomfortable and my
> > fingers are usually very sore afterwards. I hope the Miyata seat is a little
> > bit more comfortable on my hands.
> >
>
> Actually I think the Viscount is more comfortable than the Miyata (or
> carbonfibre) seats for grabbing on the side, unfortunately! Luckily there is
> an easy solution: get about a 10cm length of 1cm diameter rubber hose, and
> split it lengthwise. Slip this over the edge of the bottom of the seat where
> you grab it (either left or right quadrant). Glue or Duct-tape it in place.
> This creates a rounded edge that’s comfortable to grab.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Kris.
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos - 35mm Quality Prints, Now Get 15 Free!
> http://photos.yahoo.com/

Re: New seat designs

“John Foss” <john_foss@asinet.com> wrote in message
news:631B3F1D150FD3118E4D00A0C9EC1BDA481207@SERVER
> Having had a hand in the design of the Viscount seat, I’m interested in
> helping “get it right” on the next big upgrade. …

SNIP
>
> Without going into detail on shape or other specifics, there’s my two
cents.
> Does that stir up any controversy or additional discussion?

Dear John,

I think you just wrote the draft IUF seat standard. Great job!

Arthur Doerksen

Re: New seat designs

Kris Holm wrote:
>
> — Carl Hoyer <choyer@i-d-g.com> wrote:
> >
> > One thing about my current seats (the viscount and a no-name, but not too
> > bad seat) is that grabbing them on the side is very uncomfortable and my
> > fingers are usually very sore afterwards. I hope the Miyata seat is a little
> > bit more comfortable on my hands.
> >
>
> Actually I think the Viscount is more comfortable than the Miyata (or
> carbonfibre) seats for grabbing on the side, unfortunately!

You are right the Viscount seats are more comfortable for gripping the side.
Most of my trick riding is on the uni which has the ‘no-name’ seat, which really
is not that bad. It’s got a metal seat base (which is what really kills the
fingers) and fairly durable rubber cover.

> Luckily there is an easy solution: get about a 10cm length of 1cm diameter
> rubber hose, and split it lengthwise. Slip this over the edge of the bottom of
> the seat where you grab it (either left or right quadrant). Glue or Duct-tape
> it in place. This creates a rounded edge that’s comfortable to grab.

It’s quite funny that you bring that up :slight_smile: … I was laying awake in bed last
night thinking what I could use to make the sides more comfortable to grip. I
though of everything, packing material, getting a round piece of doweling wood
and creating a little slit for it to fit on the edge of the metal seat base and
then I thought about the garden hose I had. I flew out of bed and cut the hose
up, used a bit of duck tape and it looked like it just might work. I was on it
today and it saves the hands quite well.

So, I suppose a good uni seat should have rounded edges along the sides (perhaps
not the entire side, but enough to allow for a comfortable range in which most
rides grab the side).

I guess I have to buy myself a new garden hose now (or crimp a new end on it)!
Luckily it rained today.

Carl