New Coker Rim Review anywhere?

When I made my " rim is crap" comments it was from the perspectives of both rider and handyman. When working in the bicycle shop I had the opportunity to try out a great many rides, and I concluded that tire condition and pressure were the most important factors governing overall performance. The next most significant factor was the overall wheel condition. Tight spokes and a true rim could make a crummy bike ride very well, unfortunatly this never lasted long with cheap bikes, their crappy rims always began to flop around.
As you might suspect, I despise crappy rims.
Cokers are ridden because the tire design is so AWESOME, and cokerheads have put up with a lot of nonsense to have the fantastic feeling of flying on one wheel. I have no qualms telling people to spend a few extra bucks on a better rim, it will perform better over the life of the cycle; if for no other reason than removing a fraction of an ounce from the momentum center. I would not however rush out to replace a perfectly good stock rim. That would be a waste of time and resources. Put a little air in the tire and go have some fun. carjug

Re: New Coker Rim Review anywhere?

On 19 Sep 2002 20:26:38 GMT, “Nathan Hoover” <nathan@movaris.com>
wrote:

>Yes that’s basically it. It wasn’t that those climbs are too steep to go
>down without a brake, but it’s that they are too long. Your knees will just
>die when you descend lots with no brake on the Coker.

Well, we have no long slopes in the Netherlands, and certainly not in
the area where I live. Steep, maybe, but short. But if you let me,
just one more question: is it worse for your knees going down a steep
long hill, than to go up that same hill? Or is it only what David
said: you’re tired by the time you get to the top?

Klaas Bil

If you had this signature, I have forged it.

Re: New Coker Rim Review anywhere?

In article <3d8a4052.405485@newszilla.xs4all.nl>,
Klaas Bil <klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> wrote:
)
)Well, we have no long slopes in the Netherlands, and certainly not in
)the area where I live. Steep, maybe, but short. But if you let me,
)just one more question: is it worse for your knees going down a steep
)long hill, than to go up that same hill? Or is it only what David
)said: you’re tired by the time you get to the top?

Climbing hills doesn’t seem that hard on the knees; I took my 29" up a long
11% grade yesterday (Centennial Road for Bay Area folks), and the
only physical problem, other than fatigue, was lower back pain from
yanking on the Reeder handle.

Then I took the fire trail back down, and definitely had some knee issues
on the way. You have to jerk around a lot more on the descent.
-Tom

Re: New Coker Rim Review anywhere?

“Klaas Bil” <klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> wrote in message
news:3d8a4052.405485@newszilla.xs4all.nl…
> Well, we have no long slopes in the Netherlands, and certainly not in
> the area where I live. Steep, maybe, but short. But if you let me,
> just one more question: is it worse for your knees going down a steep
> long hill, than to go up that same hill? Or is it only what David
> said: you’re tired by the time you get to the top?
>

I find it worse going downhill than uphill, going uphill, you just have to
slog at it, whereas going downhill you really have to try hard to keep it
running away. Especially on longer rides, once you get above 40 miles or so,
you really find yourself working harder on the steep downhills much more
than on the uphills. I think it’s probably mainly because my muscles are
much more used to pushing forwards than backwards and this effect becomes
more pronounced when tired.

The coker is damn good at getting up hills on road, because it balances so
well and has so much momentum that it’s much easier to get a very slow but
smooth roll, even at speeds where you’d be doing half-pedals and stillstands
on a lesser unicycle. Off road, or once you’ve got good stillstands you can
ride up much steeper hills on a 29 or smaller wheel riding jerkily, but
whilst actually rolling the wheel smoothly on a good surface a coker can get
up most things that the others can.

Joe

Re: New Coker Rim Review anywhere?

Sorry it took a while to answer - we were busy here in Santa Cruz!

For me, it’s far harder on the knees and other leg parts going downhill. I’m
in ok shape for climbing, but I don’t know how to get in shape to go down
big steep hills on a Coker - even with long cranks. Without a brake if
someone suggested a ride that included a 1000m descent on Coker, we would
just laugh. It’s a new game with the brake though.

—Nathan

“Klaas Bil” <klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> wrote in message
news:3d8a4052.405485@newszilla.xs4all.nl…
> On 19 Sep 2002 20:26:38 GMT, “Nathan Hoover” <nathan@movaris.com>
> wrote:
>
> >Yes that’s basically it. It wasn’t that those climbs are too steep to go
> >down without a brake, but it’s that they are too long. Your knees will
just
> >die when you descend lots with no brake on the Coker.
>
> Well, we have no long slopes in the Netherlands, and certainly not in
> the area where I live. Steep, maybe, but short. But if you let me,
> just one more question: is it worse for your knees going down a steep
> long hill, than to go up that same hill? Or is it only what David
> said: you’re tired by the time you get to the top?
>
> Klaas Bil
>
> If you had this signature, I have forged it.