New Coker deluxe wheel giving me fits

I’m bummed. Friday I went for a great ride on the old Coker wheel. Saturday I put on the new Coker deluxe wheel set (Airfoil 36-inch wheel set) and I have not been able to ride straight since. I have to twist my upper body hard over to the right to keep it going straight. Now I admit that some times in the past I’ve had this problem on other new wheels. The KH24 was so off center in the frame that it pulled to the right till I dished the wheel over to center. What really bugs me is that I was riding straight and true just before the wheel change. I jumped on the o 29er for a quick ride right after fighting the Coker, rode it straight and true had a great time too. Tonight I’m putting the old wheel back on. I’ll ride it till it breaks before I fight with the deluxe again.

One thing I noticed about the new wheel is that the tire is not beaded evenly around the rim. On both side there are places where the bead is way down into the center of the rim. This makes the tire uneven at the riding surface. I let the air out and tried to pull it out some, no way I couldn’t even get a tool under the tire. I hope I never get a flat because there is no way to get the tire off to patch the tube. I was thinking that riding a bit would loosen it up some, I’ve gone about twenty miles on it and didn’t enjoy any of them.

If anybody has any Ideals let me know, I would like to get this fixed.

One more thing it may be my imagination but it feel like I’ve lost some of the fly wheel effect. Of course it could be my bad form but, I’m not able to fly up the little hills as well as on the old wheel, more of a grunt it out then the old power over.

RE: New Coker deluxe wheel giving me fits

Hi muddycycle.

We’ve sold many of these wheels and until now there have been no
complaints (other than the tire goes on very tightly). Please call us
anytime between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. We should be able to get you tracking
straight on your Coker.

We want happy unicyclists. If you’re not happy with our product, we
hope you’ll tell us so we can make it right. That’s not a hollow
statement. We will make it right. On the other hand, when you’re happy
with our product, we hope you’ll tell the world. Or at the very least,
this newsgroup. :slight_smile:

-John
1-800-Unicycle

-----Original Message-----
From: rsu-admin@unicycling.org [mailto:rsu-admin@unicycling.org] On
Behalf Of muddycycle
Sent: Monday, April 14, 2003 7:14 PM
To: rsu@unicycling.org
Subject: New Coker deluxe wheel giving me fits

I’m bummed. Friday I went for a great ride on the old Coker wheel.
Saturday I put on the new Coker deluxe wheel set (Airfoil 36-inch wheel
set) and I have not been able to ride straight since. I have to twist my
upper body hard over to the right to keep it going straight. Now I admit
that some times in the past I’ve had this problem on other new wheels.
The KH24 was so off center in the frame that it pulled to the right till
I dished the wheel over to center. What really bugs me is that I was
riding straight and true just before the wheel change. I jumped on the o
29er for a quick ride right after fighting the Coker, rode it straight
and true had a great time too. Tonight I’m putting the old wheel back
on. I’ll ride it till it breaks before I fight with the deluxe again.

One thing I noticed about the new wheel is that the tire is not beaded
evenly around the rim. On both side there are places where the bead is
way down into the center of the rim. This makes the tire uneven at the
riding surface. I let the air out and tried to pull it out some, no way
I couldn’t even get a tool under the tire. I hope I never get a flat
because there is no way to get the tire off to patch the tube. I was
thinking that riding a bit would loosen it up some, I’ve gone about
twenty miles on it and didn’t enjoy any of them.

If anybody has any Ideals let me know, I would like to get this fixed.

One more thing it may be my imagination but it feel like I’ve lost some
of the fly wheel effect. Of course it could be my bad form but, I’m not
able to fly up the little hills as well as on the old wheel, more of a
grunt it out then the old power over.


muddycycle - Nonchalance

“What can possiby mystify a madman?”
Hegira: Greg Bear

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View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/24636



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The way to fix this is:

  1. Ensure that the rim strip and tube are as reasonably seated as you can.

  2. Get the tire as evenly set as you can.

  3. Put on safety glasses.

  4. Inflate the tire slowly up to a high pressure. We brought mine up to 85 psi. Finally the tire bead seated properly as seen by examining the little lines on each side of the tire.

  5. Leave the tire at that pressure for a while, say 15 minutes to a half hour. DO NOT RIDE IT. This will allow the tire time to readjust the bit of a set it has developed.

  6. Drop the pressure slowly to 60 psi. If the bead stays properly seated, then leave it that way over night. Otherwise repeat step 4+.

  7. You should be all set to ride at your normal riding pressure. Probably for good, because now the tire is where it wants to be.

Good riding!

:stuck_out_tongue:

There is an easy way to change the tire with only plastic tools, too… I’ll leave that for another post.

…and hearing protection, especially if you’re indoors.

My dad hat a bit of trouble getting his tyre on his new rim as well. We took it to the bike shop to see if they could do anything with it. They could. If anyone else has a problem getting theirs on, heres what to do;

They deflated the tyre, put a couple of really thick cable ties really tightly round the tyre and the rim to hold it in one place, then worked round pulling the tyre round the rim, away from where the cable ties were. This loosens the tyre on the other side to get it on easily. Pump up the tyre and ride! (oh yeah, remove the cable ties first!)

They couldn’t get it on completely straight, but riding for a while on lowish pressure seems to even it out over time.

Re: New Coker deluxe wheel giving me fits

This is definitely good advice - for any tire you’re having this problem
with. A friend had this type of problem with a Gazz 26x2.6 on a Sun Mammoth.
It’s a pain when just putting it together doesn’t work perfectly, but in
this case there is a cure.

—Nathan

“U-Turn” <U-Turn.lwmqz@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote >
> 1. Ensure that the rim strip and tube are as reasonably seated as you
> can.
>
> 2. Get the tire as evenly set as you can.
>
> 3. Put on safety glasses.
>
> 4. Inflate the tire slowly up to a high pressure. We brought mine up to
> 85 psi. Finally the tire bead seated properly as seen by examining the
> little lines on each side of the tire.
>
> 5. Leave the tire at that pressure for a while, say 15 minutes to a half
> hour. DO NOT RIDE IT. This will allow the tire time to readjust the
> bit of a set it has developed.
>
> 6. Drop the pressure slowly to 60 psi. If the bead stays properly
> seated, then leave it that way over night. Otherwise repeat step 4+.
>
> 7. You should be all set to ride at your normal riding pressure.
> Probably for good, because now the tire is where it wants to be.

John thanks for your concern. I think the wheel is well built the only problem I see is that the rim strip is put on rather sloppy, where it rides up the rim is in the same place where the bead won’t set. I have fixed this problem.
Here is an update.
Last night I changed back to the old wheel and went for a ride, all was well I could ride in a relaxed manner straight down the road.
I took the advice of the U-Turn and pumped the tire up, very slowly. I got to about 60 psi and chickened out let the air out put some talc on the rim strip where it was high on the rim. I pumped it back up to 60 psi waited a few minutes and sure enough the bead slowly moved into place. I let air out and left it at 40 psi over nigh and it looks great.

I have to say that anybody that pumps one of these to 80 psi is crazy, the tire gets rock hard at about 40 and it was scary hard at 60.

For anyone that cares, while I had the wheels off I put them on the old bathroom scale. The new wheel weighed 11 pounds and the old one was 14 pounds.
I won’t be able to go on another test ride today

Wow - I guess that explains why you’ve lost some of the fly wheel effect!

Gosh, once again I’m amazed to find how complicated unicycling can be! ;0)

When I put a tyre and tube on, I:

  1. Check that the rim tape is on straight.
  2. Put one bead of the tyre on the rim.
  3. Put the tube in.
  4. Make sure the valve is straight.
  5. Starting at the valve, put the other bead of the tyre on.
  6. When this starts to get difficult…
  7. Push the valve back most of the way through the hole…
  8. Then pinch the tyre with finger and thumb, near to the valve.
  9. Then work around the tyre with fingers and thumb, squeezing the two sides of the tyre together, so that the beads fall into the deepest part of the rim
  10. And using the slack thus gained, put the last bit of bead on, being careful not to pinch the tube.
  11. Wiggle the valve to make sure it moves freely.
  12. Double check around tyre with fingers and thumb.
  13. Pump it up.

None of your 80 psi, then 60 psi, and sacrifice a cockerel business.

I did once detonate a bicycle tyre using a garage air compressor.

I did once detonate a unicycle tyre after pumping it up with a track pump (a sort of double-chambered stirrup pump.) The detonation was about 10 minutes after I had pumped it up and gone in for a cup of tea. How we laughed.

Re: New Coker deluxe wheel giving me fits

On Mon, 14 Apr 2003 18:14:14 -0500, muddycycle
<muddycycle.lwf3y@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>If anybody has any Ideals let me know

Ideals, with a capital even? What about Freedom?

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

“When someone asks you, ““A penny for your thoughts”” and you put your two cents in . . . what happens to the other penny? - George Carlin”

Actually it’s not that extreme, given the wealth of Coker tire pressure data I and our bikeshop tapped to do this. David Stone (and I, now) regularly run at 60 psi for normal road riding.

I’m glad it worked out. I had muscled mine as much as possible and that tire was not going to seat properly any other way. We used talc as well; I probably should have mentioned it.

Putting three people on the axle at 45 degrees is crazy.

One last update. I had a great ride on the new wheel. I left it at 40 psi and it rode fast and stright, thanks for the help.