Names for our skills

To me the existing names don’t sound dull or lame because I know the
exciting things that they refer to. Besides, for newbies in the sport it’s
very handy to use descriptive terms - at least I’m glad we do. Even (?)
“chocolate foot forward” beats me.

Klaas Bil

On 13 Jan 2002 01:18:58 GMT, extremeunicycler@aol.com (Dylan
Wallinger) wrote:

>>Is there anything wrong with the current names that describe the skills?
>
>Not really, it’s just that they are lame, because they practically
>describe exactly what you are doing, and they need exciting, original
>names… hopping on the wheel, wheel walking, they sound very dull…
>
>
>
>
>)—(x) Dylan Wallinger Keep Riding
>http://www.extremeunicycling-bcmat.cityslide.com


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been
picked automagically from a database:” “Arab, Binnenlandse
Veiligheidsdienst, Kosiura”

To me the existing names don’t sound dull or lame because I know the
exciting things that they refer to. Besides, for newbies in the sport it’s
very handy to use descriptive terms - at least I’m glad we do. Even (?)
“chocolate foot forward” beats me.

Klaas Bil

On 13 Jan 2002 01:18:58 GMT, extremeunicycler@aol.com (Dylan
Wallinger) wrote:

>>Is there anything wrong with the current names that describe the skills?
>
>Not really, it’s just that they are lame, because they practically
>describe exactly what you are doing, and they need exciting, original
>names… hopping on the wheel, wheel walking, they sound very dull…
>
>
>
>
>)—(x) Dylan Wallinger Keep Riding
>http://www.extremeunicycling-bcmat.cityslide.com


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been
picked automagically from a database:” “Arab, Binnenlandse
Veiligheidsdienst, Kosiura”

klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl writes:
>To me the existing names don’t sound dull or lame because I know the
>exciting things that they refer to. Besides, for newbies in the sport
>it’s very handy to use descriptive terms - at least I’m glad we do. Even
>(?) “chocolate foot forward” beats me.
I’ll make an allusion to a few other athletic endeavors.

In baseball, it would be kinda dull if every time a batter hit the ball
and made it to 2nd Base, a parent in the stands explained, “He made a safe
hit and ran safely to second base.” The word ‘double’ takes care of most
of that effectively, even if it’s not entirely transparent.

In football, no announcer would regularly tell home viewers, “…he
crosses the scoring line and scores 6 points for his team!” Instead, it
would sound like this: “…across the endzone… Touchdown!”

I won’t even attempt to describe what the various defenses in basketball
and football (nickel defense, zone,…) would sound like if they had to be
described clearly.

Then you look at a sport which we might want to emulate to some extent:
skateboarding. That’s where we get Ollies and all sorts of jargon which I
can’t even recall. I don’t get half of what the announcers are saying when
I watch the X-Games, but the games are really popular, and many people do
understand. What I get from the jargon is that there are names for most of
the tricks being performed…but there is no way to explain them more
clearly bc they are done too fast.

Now look into our dull lexicon. We need to make some fun changes which
most people like and which make some sense. We can even name some
skills/stunts for excellent riders who first (or best) performed them. I
am sure that some of our Level 10ers have invented some pretty cool
stuff, and we could honor their achievements with eponymous names for
those skills.

  • David

>
>On 13 Jan 2002 01:18:58 GMT, extremeunicycler@aol.com (Dylan
>Wallinger) wrote:
>
>>>Is there anything wrong with the current names that describe the
>>>skills?
>>
>>Not really, it’s just that they are lame, because they practically
>describe
>>exactly what you are doing, and they need exciting, original names…
>hopping
>>on the wheel, wheel walking, they sound very dull…

David Stone Co-founder, Unatics of NY 1st Sunday / 3rd Saturday @ Central
Park Bandshell
1:30 start time after 11/1/01

I can’t agree more. If there is a NEED, it will develope- naturaly. I don’t think skate lingo developed out of sypathy for sports casters. While some unicyclists might be skaters, or do the BMX thing- we are a different lot, and things could go ill for us…

…When Harper inevitably becomes the cycling star he’s bound to be, do we all want to be stuck saying “Non-Euclidean” for “Off-Road”?

Christopher

Your examples refer to quick (i.e. many events per unit of time) sports
that are covered by an announcer. In such cases I see the need for a lot
of short-hand terms to keep up with the events. If some peoples’
aspirations come true and unicycling in one form and/or another becomes an
Olympic sport, we might be going to need such flashy terms too. But I
think that we have lots of time (at least!) to let the lingo develop
naturally, no need to push it. Just my opinion.

Klaas Bil

On Mon, 14 Jan 2002 09:29:42 -0500, “David Stone”
<dstone@packer.edu> wrote:

>klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl writes:
>>To me the existing names don’t sound dull or lame because I know the
>>exciting things that they refer to. Besides, for newbies in the sport
>>it’s very handy to use descriptive terms - at least I’m glad we do. Even
>>(?) “chocolate foot forward” beats me.
>I’ll make an allusion to a few other athletic endeavors.
>
>In baseball, it would be kinda dull if every time a batter hit the ball
>and made it to 2nd Base, a parent in the stands explained, "He made a
>safe hit and ran safely to second base." The word ‘double’ takes care of
>most of that effectively, even if it’s not entirely transparent.
>
>In football, no announcer would regularly tell home viewers, "…he
>crosses the scoring line and scores 6 points for his team!" Instead, it
>would sound like this: “…across the endzone… Touchdown!”
>
>I won’t even attempt to describe what the various defenses in basketball
>and football (nickel defense, zone,…) would sound like if they had to
>be described clearly.
>
>Then you look at a sport which we might want to emulate to some extent:
>skateboarding. That’s where we get Ollies and all sorts of jargon which I
>can’t even recall. I don’t get half of what the announcers are saying
>when I watch the X-Games, but the games are really popular, and many
>people do understand. What I get from the jargon is that there are names
>for most of the tricks being performed…but there is no way to explain
>them more clearly bc they are done too fast.
>
>Now look into our dull lexicon. We need to make some fun changes which
>most people like and which make some sense. We can even name some
>skills/stunts for excellent riders who first (or best) performed them. I
>am sure that some of our Level 10ers have invented some pretty cool
>stuff, and we could honor their achievements with eponymous names for
>those skills.
>- David
>
>>
>>On 13 Jan 2002 01:18:58 GMT, extremeunicycler@aol.com (Dylan
>>Wallinger) wrote:
>>
>>>>Is there anything wrong with the current names that describe the
>>>>skills?
>>>
>>>Not really, it’s just that they are lame, because they practically
>>describe
>>>exactly what you are doing, and they need exciting, original names…
>>hopping
>>>on the wheel, wheel walking, they sound very dull…
>
>David Stone Co-founder, Unatics of NY 1st Sunday / 3rd Saturday @ Central
>Park Bandshell
>1:30 start time after 11/1/01
>


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “PPP, VULNERABILIY, 1*”

Your examples refer to quick (i.e. many events per unit of time) sports
that are covered by an announcer. In such cases I see the need for a lot
of short-hand terms to keep up with the events. If some peoples’
aspirations come true and unicycling in one form and/or another becomes an
Olympic sport, we might be going to need such flashy terms too. But I
think that we have lots of time (at least!) to let the lingo develop
naturally, no need to push it. Just my opinion.

Klaas Bil

On Mon, 14 Jan 2002 09:29:42 -0500, “David Stone”
<dstone@packer.edu> wrote:

>klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl writes:
>>To me the existing names don’t sound dull or lame because I know the
>>exciting things that they refer to. Besides, for newbies in the sport
>>it’s very handy to use descriptive terms - at least I’m glad we do. Even
>>(?) “chocolate foot forward” beats me.
>I’ll make an allusion to a few other athletic endeavors.
>
>In baseball, it would be kinda dull if every time a batter hit the ball
>and made it to 2nd Base, a parent in the stands explained, "He made a
>safe hit and ran safely to second base." The word ‘double’ takes care of
>most of that effectively, even if it’s not entirely transparent.
>
>In football, no announcer would regularly tell home viewers, "…he
>crosses the scoring line and scores 6 points for his team!" Instead, it
>would sound like this: “…across the endzone… Touchdown!”
>
>I won’t even attempt to describe what the various defenses in basketball
>and football (nickel defense, zone,…) would sound like if they had to
>be described clearly.
>
>Then you look at a sport which we might want to emulate to some extent:
>skateboarding. That’s where we get Ollies and all sorts of jargon which I
>can’t even recall. I don’t get half of what the announcers are saying
>when I watch the X-Games, but the games are really popular, and many
>people do understand. What I get from the jargon is that there are names
>for most of the tricks being performed…but there is no way to explain
>them more clearly bc they are done too fast.
>
>Now look into our dull lexicon. We need to make some fun changes which
>most people like and which make some sense. We can even name some
>skills/stunts for excellent riders who first (or best) performed them. I
>am sure that some of our Level 10ers have invented some pretty cool
>stuff, and we could honor their achievements with eponymous names for
>those skills.
>- David
>
>>
>>On 13 Jan 2002 01:18:58 GMT, extremeunicycler@aol.com (Dylan
>>Wallinger) wrote:
>>
>>>>Is there anything wrong with the current names that describe the
>>>>skills?
>>>
>>>Not really, it’s just that they are lame, because they practically
>>describe
>>>exactly what you are doing, and they need exciting, original names…
>>hopping
>>>on the wheel, wheel walking, they sound very dull…
>
>David Stone Co-founder, Unatics of NY 1st Sunday / 3rd Saturday @ Central
>Park Bandshell
>1:30 start time after 11/1/01
>


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “PPP, VULNERABILIY, 1*”

Your examples refer to quick (i.e. many events per unit of time) sports
that are covered by an announcer. In such cases I see the need for a lot
of short-hand terms to keep up with the events. If some peoples’
aspirations come true and unicycling in one form and/or another becomes an
Olympic sport, we might be going to need such flashy terms too. But I
think that we have lots of time (at least!) to let the lingo develop
naturally, no need to push it. Just my opinion.

Klaas Bil

On Mon, 14 Jan 2002 09:29:42 -0500, “David Stone”
<dstone@packer.edu> wrote:

>klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl writes:
>>To me the existing names don’t sound dull or lame because I know the
>>exciting things that they refer to. Besides, for newbies in the sport
>>it’s very handy to use descriptive terms - at least I’m glad we do. Even
>>(?) “chocolate foot forward” beats me.
>I’ll make an allusion to a few other athletic endeavors.
>
>In baseball, it would be kinda dull if every time a batter hit the ball
>and made it to 2nd Base, a parent in the stands explained, "He made a
>safe hit and ran safely to second base." The word ‘double’ takes care of
>most of that effectively, even if it’s not entirely transparent.
>
>In football, no announcer would regularly tell home viewers, "…he
>crosses the scoring line and scores 6 points for his team!" Instead, it
>would sound like this: “…across the endzone… Touchdown!”
>
>I won’t even attempt to describe what the various defenses in basketball
>and football (nickel defense, zone,…) would sound like if they had to
>be described clearly.
>
>Then you look at a sport which we might want to emulate to some extent:
>skateboarding. That’s where we get Ollies and all sorts of jargon which I
>can’t even recall. I don’t get half of what the announcers are saying
>when I watch the X-Games, but the games are really popular, and many
>people do understand. What I get from the jargon is that there are names
>for most of the tricks being performed…but there is no way to explain
>them more clearly bc they are done too fast.
>
>Now look into our dull lexicon. We need to make some fun changes which
>most people like and which make some sense. We can even name some
>skills/stunts for excellent riders who first (or best) performed them. I
>am sure that some of our Level 10ers have invented some pretty cool
>stuff, and we could honor their achievements with eponymous names for
>those skills.
>- David
>
>>
>>On 13 Jan 2002 01:18:58 GMT, extremeunicycler@aol.com (Dylan
>>Wallinger) wrote:
>>
>>>>Is there anything wrong with the current names that describe the
>>>>skills?
>>>
>>>Not really, it’s just that they are lame, because they practically
>>describe
>>>exactly what you are doing, and they need exciting, original names…
>>hopping
>>>on the wheel, wheel walking, they sound very dull…
>
>David Stone Co-founder, Unatics of NY 1st Sunday / 3rd Saturday @ Central
>Park Bandshell
>1:30 start time after 11/1/01
>


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “PPP, VULNERABILIY, 1*”

Your examples refer to quick (i.e. many events per unit of time) sports
that are covered by an announcer. In such cases I see the need for a lot
of short-hand terms to keep up with the events. If some peoples’
aspirations come true and unicycling in one form and/or another becomes an
Olympic sport, we might be going to need such flashy terms too. But I
think that we have lots of time (at least!) to let the lingo develop
naturally, no need to push it. Just my opinion.

Klaas Bil

On Mon, 14 Jan 2002 09:29:42 -0500, “David Stone”
<dstone@packer.edu> wrote:

>klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl writes:
>>To me the existing names don’t sound dull or lame because I know the
>>exciting things that they refer to. Besides, for newbies in the sport
>>it’s very handy to use descriptive terms - at least I’m glad we do. Even
>>(?) “chocolate foot forward” beats me.
>I’ll make an allusion to a few other athletic endeavors.
>
>In baseball, it would be kinda dull if every time a batter hit the ball
>and made it to 2nd Base, a parent in the stands explained, "He made a
>safe hit and ran safely to second base." The word ‘double’ takes care of
>most of that effectively, even if it’s not entirely transparent.
>
>In football, no announcer would regularly tell home viewers, "…he
>crosses the scoring line and scores 6 points for his team!" Instead, it
>would sound like this: “…across the endzone… Touchdown!”
>
>I won’t even attempt to describe what the various defenses in basketball
>and football (nickel defense, zone,…) would sound like if they had to
>be described clearly.
>
>Then you look at a sport which we might want to emulate to some extent:
>skateboarding. That’s where we get Ollies and all sorts of jargon which I
>can’t even recall. I don’t get half of what the announcers are saying
>when I watch the X-Games, but the games are really popular, and many
>people do understand. What I get from the jargon is that there are names
>for most of the tricks being performed…but there is no way to explain
>them more clearly bc they are done too fast.
>
>Now look into our dull lexicon. We need to make some fun changes which
>most people like and which make some sense. We can even name some
>skills/stunts for excellent riders who first (or best) performed them. I
>am sure that some of our Level 10ers have invented some pretty cool
>stuff, and we could honor their achievements with eponymous names for
>those skills.
>- David
>
>>
>>On 13 Jan 2002 01:18:58 GMT, extremeunicycler@aol.com (Dylan
>>Wallinger) wrote:
>>
>>>>Is there anything wrong with the current names that describe the
>>>>skills?
>>>
>>>Not really, it’s just that they are lame, because they practically
>>describe
>>>exactly what you are doing, and they need exciting, original names…
>>hopping
>>>on the wheel, wheel walking, they sound very dull…
>
>David Stone Co-founder, Unatics of NY 1st Sunday / 3rd Saturday @ Central
>Park Bandshell
>1:30 start time after 11/1/01
>


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “PPP, VULNERABILIY, 1*”

> I can’t agree more. If there is a NEED, it will develope- naturaly. I
> don’t think skate lingo developed out of sypathy for sports casters.
> While some unicyclists might be skaters, or do the BMX thing- we are a
> different lot, and things could go ill for us…

The larger sports like skateboarding have vast numbers of participants
and wide, multiple lines of communication. This makes it easier to
spread unusual skill names, and have places where people can learn what
they mean.

In unicycling, the biggest worldwide pipeline of information is this
newsgroup. All the people who read this newsgroup are only a fraction of
the number you would need to support a full-fledged glossy color magazine
about the sport. We’ll get there someday, but we’re not there yet.

When we have better and easier communication in the world of unicycling,
I’m sure a lot of this more “fun” terminology will come into use.

In the meantime, the Unicycling Society of America has its quarterly
newsletter. If you aren’t a subscriber, you are missing out because it has
much better pictures than this newsgroup :slight_smile: and articles that do not get
published here. Subscribers are welcome from anywhere; you don’t have to
live in the US: http://www.unicycling.org/usa/join/

Stay on top, John Foss President, Unicycling Society of America President,
International Unicycling Federation jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

> I can’t agree more. If there is a NEED, it will develope- naturaly. I
> don’t think skate lingo developed out of sypathy for sports casters.
> While some unicyclists might be skaters, or do the BMX thing- we are a
> different lot, and things could go ill for us…

The larger sports like skateboarding have vast numbers of participants
and wide, multiple lines of communication. This makes it easier to
spread unusual skill names, and have places where people can learn what
they mean.

In unicycling, the biggest worldwide pipeline of information is this
newsgroup. All the people who read this newsgroup are only a fraction of
the number you would need to support a full-fledged glossy color magazine
about the sport. We’ll get there someday, but we’re not there yet.

When we have better and easier communication in the world of unicycling,
I’m sure a lot of this more “fun” terminology will come into use.

In the meantime, the Unicycling Society of America has its quarterly
newsletter. If you aren’t a subscriber, you are missing out because it has
much better pictures than this newsgroup :slight_smile: and articles that do not get
published here. Subscribers are welcome from anywhere; you don’t have to
live in the US: http://www.unicycling.org/usa/join/

Stay on top, John Foss President, Unicycling Society of America President,
International Unicycling Federation jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

> I can’t agree more. If there is a NEED, it will develope- naturaly. I
> don’t think skate lingo developed out of sypathy for sports casters.
> While some unicyclists might be skaters, or do the BMX thing- we are a
> different lot, and things could go ill for us…

The larger sports like skateboarding have vast numbers of participants
and wide, multiple lines of communication. This makes it easier to
spread unusual skill names, and have places where people can learn what
they mean.

In unicycling, the biggest worldwide pipeline of information is this
newsgroup. All the people who read this newsgroup are only a fraction of
the number you would need to support a full-fledged glossy color magazine
about the sport. We’ll get there someday, but we’re not there yet.

When we have better and easier communication in the world of unicycling,
I’m sure a lot of this more “fun” terminology will come into use.

In the meantime, the Unicycling Society of America has its quarterly
newsletter. If you aren’t a subscriber, you are missing out because it has
much better pictures than this newsgroup :slight_smile: and articles that do not get
published here. Subscribers are welcome from anywhere; you don’t have to
live in the US: http://www.unicycling.org/usa/join/

Stay on top, John Foss President, Unicycling Society of America President,
International Unicycling Federation jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

> I can’t agree more. If there is a NEED, it will develope- naturaly. I
> don’t think skate lingo developed out of sypathy for sports casters.
> While some unicyclists might be skaters, or do the BMX thing- we are a
> different lot, and things could go ill for us…

The larger sports like skateboarding have vast numbers of participants
and wide, multiple lines of communication. This makes it easier to
spread unusual skill names, and have places where people can learn what
they mean.

In unicycling, the biggest worldwide pipeline of information is this
newsgroup. All the people who read this newsgroup are only a fraction of
the number you would need to support a full-fledged glossy color magazine
about the sport. We’ll get there someday, but we’re not there yet.

When we have better and easier communication in the world of unicycling,
I’m sure a lot of this more “fun” terminology will come into use.

In the meantime, the Unicycling Society of America has its quarterly
newsletter. If you aren’t a subscriber, you are missing out because it has
much better pictures than this newsgroup :slight_smile: and articles that do not get
published here. Subscribers are welcome from anywhere; you don’t have to
live in the US: http://www.unicycling.org/usa/join/

Stay on top, John Foss President, Unicycling Society of America President,
International Unicycling Federation jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

> I can’t agree more. If there is a NEED, it will develope- naturaly. I
> don’t think skate lingo developed out of sypathy for sports casters.
> While some unicyclists might be skaters, or do the BMX thing- we are a
> different lot, and things could go ill for us…

The larger sports like skateboarding have vast numbers of participants
and wide, multiple lines of communication. This makes it easier to
spread unusual skill names, and have places where people can learn what
they mean.

In unicycling, the biggest worldwide pipeline of information is this
newsgroup. All the people who read this newsgroup are only a fraction of
the number you would need to support a full-fledged glossy color magazine
about the sport. We’ll get there someday, but we’re not there yet.

When we have better and easier communication in the world of unicycling,
I’m sure a lot of this more “fun” terminology will come into use.

In the meantime, the Unicycling Society of America has its quarterly
newsletter. If you aren’t a subscriber, you are missing out because it has
much better pictures than this newsgroup :slight_smile: and articles that do not get
published here. Subscribers are welcome from anywhere; you don’t have to
live in the US: http://www.unicycling.org/usa/join/

Stay on top, John Foss President, Unicycling Society of America President,
International Unicycling Federation jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

> I can’t agree more. If there is a NEED, it will develope- naturaly. I
> don’t think skate lingo developed out of sypathy for sports casters.
> While some unicyclists might be skaters, or do the BMX thing- we are a
> different lot, and things could go ill for us…

The larger sports like skateboarding have vast numbers of participants
and wide, multiple lines of communication. This makes it easier to
spread unusual skill names, and have places where people can learn what
they mean.

In unicycling, the biggest worldwide pipeline of information is this
newsgroup. All the people who read this newsgroup are only a fraction of
the number you would need to support a full-fledged glossy color magazine
about the sport. We’ll get there someday, but we’re not there yet.

When we have better and easier communication in the world of unicycling,
I’m sure a lot of this more “fun” terminology will come into use.

In the meantime, the Unicycling Society of America has its quarterly
newsletter. If you aren’t a subscriber, you are missing out because it has
much better pictures than this newsgroup :slight_smile: and articles that do not get
published here. Subscribers are welcome from anywhere; you don’t have to
live in the US: http://www.unicycling.org/usa/join/

Stay on top, John Foss President, Unicycling Society of America President,
International Unicycling Federation jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

> I can’t agree more. If there is a NEED, it will develope- naturaly. I
> don’t think skate lingo developed out of sypathy for sports casters.
> While some unicyclists might be skaters, or do the BMX thing- we are a
> different lot, and things could go ill for us…

The larger sports like skateboarding have vast numbers of participants
and wide, multiple lines of communication. This makes it easier to
spread unusual skill names, and have places where people can learn what
they mean.

In unicycling, the biggest worldwide pipeline of information is this
newsgroup. All the people who read this newsgroup are only a fraction of
the number you would need to support a full-fledged glossy color magazine
about the sport. We’ll get there someday, but we’re not there yet.

When we have better and easier communication in the world of unicycling,
I’m sure a lot of this more “fun” terminology will come into use.

In the meantime, the Unicycling Society of America has its quarterly
newsletter. If you aren’t a subscriber, you are missing out because it has
much better pictures than this newsgroup :slight_smile: and articles that do not get
published here. Subscribers are welcome from anywhere; you don’t have to
live in the US: http://www.unicycling.org/usa/join/

Stay on top, John Foss President, Unicycling Society of America President,
International Unicycling Federation jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com