My first wheel building session...

Today I started to fit my friend (and boss)'s hub (Profile) onto his unicycle at the bike shop (whcih he owns and where I work). I’d never built a wheel before and it was really interesting. We had to close the shop but I got up to putting the hub in and semi-tightening the spokes, with his direction. I’ll finish it off tomorrow and then I’ll be visiting him at the shop every day to ride his beast of a unicycle! Mine will be better though!

Andrew Carter

Re: My first wheel building session…

Bravo!

Congratulations Carter! Wheelbuilding is more than a skill… Is an art!
When you made your own wheels, you are a more complete cyclist or
unicyclist… What lacing pattern are you doing in your wheel? Radial?
Cross-3? or Cross-4? I’ve laced my homebuilt with the Cross-4 pattern and
I’ve trued the wheel in a workbench I’ve made too. Two squared posts holded
in a vise. Instead of reference pointers, I use a Vernier Caliper to measure
the differences…

Stay building your wheels!

[]'s Eduardo

Ypê Bike: http://www.ypebike.cjb.net/
Ypê Mono: http://www.ype.unicyclist.com/

----- Original Message -----
From: “andrew_carter” <andrew_carter.exfxa@timelimit.unicyclist.com>
Newsgroups: rec.sport.unicycling
To: <rsu@unicycling.org>
Sent: Saturday, November 30, 2002 8:37 AM
Subject: My first wheel building session…

>
> Today I started to fit my friend (and boss)'s hub (Profile) onto his
> unicycle at the bike shop (whcih he owns and where I work). I’d never
> built a wheel before and it was really interesting. We had to close the
> shop but I got up to putting the hib in and semi-tightening the spokes,
> with his direction. I’ll finish it off tomorrow and then I’ll be
> visiting him at the shop every day to ride his beast of a unicycle!
> Mine will be better though!
>
> Andrew Carter

Thanks Eduardo,

I (we) used the Cross-3 pattern. Does Cross-4 give more strength? Trueing (or truing, I don’t know) a wheel is a really handy skill that I’ve been taught. I can’t seem to find any way to attach the unicycle wheel to the truign stand though. Maybe I’d have to move the bearing holders.

It’ll be good because now that I have build Gary’s wheel with his help I should be able to build my wheel (when it arrives) on my own. It’s great living about 2.5km from the bike shop because I can use all the tools and equipment there.

Thanks,
Andrew

Re: My first wheel building session…

I think that the Cross-4 pattern gives more strenght, because you close the
angle between a leader spoke and a trailer spoke. I’ve laced all my cycle
wheels (my unicycle, my wooden recumbent, my tandem, my wife’s 1950 Phillips
and the boys’ bikes) in the Cross-4 pattern…

Unicycle wheels are impossible to attach to a trueing workbench made to true
bike wheels. I’ve made my own workbench with attachments to bike and
unicycle wheels. It’s not difficult to make a tueing workbench. All you need
is two pieces of aluminum square tubes and a vise. The professional trueing
workbench, has some pointers to calibrate the distances and measures. I
didn’t made these pointers. I use a Vernier Caliper to compare. Maybe I’m
not so quick to true a wheel as a professional wheelsmith, but the result is
always satisfatory.

[]'s Eduardo

Ypê Bike: http://www.ypebike.cjb.net/
Ypê Mono: http://www.ype.unicyclist.com/

----- Original Message -----
From: “andrew_carter” <andrew_carter.ey5ma@timelimit.unicyclist.com>
Newsgroups: rec.sport.unicycling
To: <rsu@unicycling.org>
Sent: Saturday, November 30, 2002 5:48 PM
Subject: Re: My first wheel building session…

>
> Thanks Eduardo,
>
> I (we) used the Cross-3 pattern. Does Cross-4 give more strength?
> Trueing (or truing, I don’t know) a wheel is a really handy skill that
> I’ve been taught. I can’t seem to find any way to attach the unicycle
> wheel to the truign stand though. Maybe I’d have to move the bearing
> holders.
>
> It’ll be good because now that I have build Gary’s wheel with his help I
> should be able to build my wheel (when it arrives) on my own. It’s
> great living about 2.5km from the bike shop because I can use all the
> tools and equipment there.
>
> Thanks,
> Andrew
>
>
> –
> andrew_carter - I’ve got the Profile bits!
>
> “Very few cartoons are broadcasted live. It’s a terrible strain on the
> animator’s wrist.”
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> andrew_carter’s Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/1052
> View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/21914
>
>


> rec.sport.unicycling mailing list -
www.unicycling.org/mailman/listinfo/rsu
>

Could you please describe these attachments for trueing unicycle wheels to me? You don’t have any photos do you?

Thanks,
Andrew

3x or 4x is a popular argument in the bike world. (DH mostly)

The argument is…4X would theoretically be stronger, however, the spokes would then have to be longer, making them weaker that way.

It’s probably either or

Thanks ‘Sofa’, that makes a lot of sense.

Re: My first wheel building session…

It may not always be the case that the more crosses, the stonger the wheel
is. Big wheels are definately stronger at 4 cross, Cokers are fantastic!
But on smaller wheels like 20" wheels because of the size of the flanges on
unicycle hubs the spokes touch the next nipples heads. This causes a
localised pressure and a weekness - this is where spokes normally break.
This can also happen with 3 cross with 19" wheels with 12 guage spokes! If
you want a really strong wheel attention is needed at the hub end. Idealy
the spoke should leave the flange tangentially from a smooth deburred
chamfered holes…
Just my pennies worth.

Roger

----- Original Message -----
From: “Eduardo L P Jr” <edulpj@gmx.net>
To: <rsu@unicycling.org>
Sent: Saturday, November 30, 2002 10:40 PM
Subject: Re: My first wheel building session…

> I think that the Cross-4 pattern gives more strenght, because you close
the
> angle between a leader spoke and a trailer spoke. I’ve laced all my cycle
> wheels (my unicycle, my wooden recumbent, my tandem, my wife’s 1950
Phillips
> and the boys’ bikes) in the Cross-4 pattern…
>
> Unicycle wheels are impossible to attach to a trueing workbench made to
true
> bike wheels. I’ve made my own workbench with attachments to bike and
> unicycle wheels. It’s not difficult to make a tueing workbench. All you
need
> is two pieces of aluminum square tubes and a vise. The professional
trueing
> workbench, has some pointers to calibrate the distances and measures. I
> didn’t made these pointers. I use a Vernier Caliper to compare. Maybe I’m
> not so quick to true a wheel as a professional wheelsmith, but the result
is
> always satisfatory.
>
> []'s Eduardo
>
> Ypê Bike: http://www.ypebike.cjb.net/
> Ypê Mono: http://www.ype.unicyclist.com/
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: “andrew_carter” <andrew_carter.ey5ma@timelimit.unicyclist.com>
> Newsgroups: rec.sport.unicycling
> To: <rsu@unicycling.org>
> Sent: Saturday, November 30, 2002 5:48 PM
> Subject: Re: My first wheel building session…
>
>
> >
> > Thanks Eduardo,
> >
> > I (we) used the Cross-3 pattern. Does Cross-4 give more strength?
> > Trueing (or truing, I don’t know) a wheel is a really handy skill that
> > I’ve been taught. I can’t seem to find any way to attach the unicycle
> > wheel to the truign stand though. Maybe I’d have to move the bearing
> > holders.
> >
> > It’ll be good because now that I have build Gary’s wheel with his help I
> > should be able to build my wheel (when it arrives) on my own. It’s
> > great living about 2.5km from the bike shop because I can use all the
> > tools and equipment there.
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Andrew
> >
> >
> > –
> > andrew_carter - I’ve got the Profile bits!
> >
> > “Very few cartoons are broadcasted live. It’s a terrible strain on the
> > animator’s wrist.”
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > andrew_carter’s Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/1052
> > View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/21914
> >
> >
>


> > rec.sport.unicycling mailing list -
> www.unicycling.org/mailman/listinfo/rsu
> >
>
>


> rec.sport.unicycling mailing list -
www.unicycling.org/mailman/listinfo/rsu
>
>

Roger,

Could you please explain what you mean by smooth deburred chamfered holes? I understand the chamfered bit.

Thanks,
Andrew

Hi

For a truing stand I use the frame a sit the wheel in it so it spins freely I then get a spare seat post and clamp it in a vice and put the fame upside down on the seat tube. For truing I use a surface gauge to make sure its it running true. About the cross pattern of the wheel from what I understand is that the 3x pattern is proven to be the best compromise of strength and weight for the spoked wheel. I have herd that the 4x pattern is better for high stress riding like trials and DH I’m not sure but the experience I’ve had with a 19” trials wheel and 4x pattern means that the spoke angle is very steep and this can be a down side. So I’ve built all my wheels with the 3x pattern not that I’ve built all that many.

Luke.

Re: My first wheel building session…

Smooth and deburred means that there are not bumps or spikes sticking out
from the hole or surface where the spoke touches. If there was this creates
a localises pressure point and hence a potential failier.

Roger

----- Original Message -----
From: “andrew_carter” <andrew_carter.eyikz@timelimit.unicyclist.com>
Newsgroups: rec.sport.unicycling
To: <rsu@unicycling.org>
Sent: Sunday, December 01, 2002 12:29 AM
Subject: Re: My first wheel building session…

>
> > Idealy the spoke should leave the flange tangentially from a smooth
> > deburred chamfered holes…
>
> Roger,
>
> Could you please explain what you mean by smooth deburred chamfered
> holes? I understand the chamfered bit.
>
> Thanks,
> Andrew
>
>
> –
> andrew_carter - I’ve got the Profile bits!
>
> “Very few cartoons are broadcasted live. It’s a terrible strain on the
> animator’s wrist.”
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> andrew_carter’s Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/1052
> View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/21914
>
>


> rec.sport.unicycling mailing list -
www.unicycling.org/mailman/listinfo/rsu
>