Muni: tire size, longevity

I’m thinking of getting a muni and am considering things like tire size and
longevity.

I recently got a 20" after having ridden on a 24 for a long time. After just a
few weeks with it, I find the 24 to feel slugish, but smooth, while the 20 is
very responsive. I know with a muni I’m going to need more wheel diameter to
help smooth out the bumps, but I’m wondering how big you need to go. I’ve
noticed that most of the munis at UnicycleSource can be had in either 24 or 26,
with 26 being the most common. I’m thinking 26, but I’d be curious to hear
someone’s opinion who’s done it for awhile.

Second is the inevitable tradeoff of price vs performance. At this point in
time, I expect most of these unicycles will outperform me, but I am improving
and I want to get something I’ll want to KEEP this time rather then considering
it a disposable training tool. On the other hand, I could get two Pashleys for
the price of a Hunter or DMATU. I’ve noticed that some of you (Nathan?) have
started with a Pashley and later upgraded. What do you think? Start low and move
up, or jump up the line a ways to start with?

As always, cheaper fits the budget better, but as I say, I want to get something
I won’t feel like replacing in a few months. I’d really like a Miyata seat, so
if I get a Pashley, I"ll have to upgrade that. And probably the stock tire,
and…well… At what point should I really be thinking about something else??

Thanks, Greg

Re: tire size, longevity

Personally, my favorite tire size is 24x3.0. It’s perfect, assuming it fits in
your frame. The 26x3.0’s are monsters, great for trail riding, but I like being
a little closer to the ground when the going gets technical. Either diameter by
2.6" or less is a compromise. You need a wide rim to match of course. A Miyata
seat is the only way to go - you’ll need the handle and bumper for the seat
you’ll be making with Roger’s carbon base and the Roach cover.

As to budget, as in most things you get what you pay for. If you are still
learning and aren’t sure how much you’ll be doing MUni in the future, then you
should go with a cheaper model. If you just KNOW that you’ll be using it a lot
for a long time, then I think it’s obvious what you need to do. You can pay for
the difference by not going out to dinner, not buying any new clothes, cutting
down on beer consumption* or whatever. One possible reason to put off the
purchase of the ultimate machine now is that these unicycles are evolving very
fast. It’s only within the last year or so that the current generation of really
nice machines (Hunter, DM, Telford, etc) have been available, and they are
changing rapidly. That could be a reason to wait, but if I were you I’d be too
impatient to get out there and ride one, so I’d buy one of the above now.

No matter what you buy, it won’t last forever. This sport will cost you some
amount per year in equipment costs. Just be glad your sport isn’t downhill
skiing or race car driving or yachting or …

                               Good luck,
                                 Nathan
  • Last resort!

“Greg House” <ghouse@southwind.net> wrote in message
news:970627801.724583863@news.onemain.com
> I’m thinking of getting a muni and am considering things like tire size
and
> longevity.
>
> I recently got a 20" after having ridden on a 24 for a long time. After
just a
> few weeks with it, I find the 24 to feel slugish, but smooth, while the 20
is
> very responsive. I know with a muni I’m going to need more wheel diameter
to
> help smooth out the bumps, but I’m wondering how big you need to go. I’ve
> noticed that most of the munis at UnicycleSource can be had in either 24
or 26,
> with 26 being the most common. I’m thinking 26, but I’d be curious to hear
> someone’s opinion who’s done it for awhile.
>
> Second is the inevitable tradeoff of price vs performance. At this point
in
> time, I expect most of these unicycles will outperform me, but I am
improving
> and I want to get something I’ll want to KEEP this time rather then
considering
> it a disposable training tool. On the other hand, I could get two Pashleys
for
> the price of a Hunter or DMATU. I’ve noticed that some of you (Nathan?)
have
> started with a Pashley and later upgraded. What do you think? Start low
and
> move up, or jump up the line a ways to start with?
>
> As always, cheaper fits the budget better, but as I say, I want to get
> something I won’t feel like replacing in a few months. I’d really like a
Miyata
> seat, so if I get a Pashley, I"ll have to upgrade that. And probably the
stock
> tire, and…well… At what point should I really be thinking about
something
> else??
>
> Thanks, Greg