Muni technique question

I have a question about MUni riding technique.

I have noticed that I have a tendency to hold onto the seat pretty much all the
time while riding on trails. When I first started Muniing I held the seat with
the left hand and balanced with the right. Now I switch hands constantly. I hold
with the right hand and balance with the left when I am turning right, and hold
with the left hand when turning left. If the wheel is drifting to one side or
the other I try to correct it by holding the seat with hand opposite the drift.
I don’t think I have as much control for dealing with unexpected bumps, etc. if
I am not holding the seat. Is this a good idea? Would I be better off not
holding onto the seat all the time? What do you think?

John Hooten

RE: Muni technique question

John Hooten wrote:
>I don’t think I have as much control for dealing with unexpected bumps, etc. if
>I am not holding the seat. Is this a good idea? Would I be better off not
>holding onto the seat all the time? What do you think?

You can probably get carpal tunnel syndrome.

But I hold the seat almost all the time. If I’m not on the technical stuff and
using my grip to keep me where the unicycle is, I’m pressing down on it to take
some of my weight off. I don’t like riding freehand for long periods of time
because it’s too hard on the rest of me (on the seat). Now I’m building an air
seat, but I don’t expect it to change my technique.

I’m also a fan of my new Miyata seats. Yeah, I know the ones with the handles
have been out for years, but I ride old stuff. The handle is great! I may try
mounting a computer in there.

George Peck would probably tell you that holding the seat on the technical stuff
is cheating. So when you get good enough to have a choice in the matter, riding
it without holding on makes you more of a hardcore MUni-ist.

jf

Re:Muni technique question

Roger Davis wrote:
>I would have said you are doing most things right. It is not good to
get a
>relience on holding the seat though. I would practice riding without holding
>the seat as this improves your general muni skill level. If you are
able to

>react to the bad knocks without your hand hold, you will be able to
ride the

>impossible ones when you are holding on! It also gives you the ability
to
>use your arms for additional balance in difficult situations. Another similar
>thing to practice is jumping and the transfer of weight

>without holding on to the seat.

have fun

Roger

And George Peck wrote:
>holding on to the seat can net you a lot of extra torque. So in sandy, muddy,
>or very steep stuff, holding on is okay. And it’s okay for hopping and jumping.
>But generally it is way cool to be hands off as much as possible. Throw the
>hands in just when they’re needed.

Taking this advice I have concentrated on riding without holding the handle as
much as possible and trying to find the circumstances where I have to hold the
handle. I was quite surprised by the types of terrain I was able to ride through
without pulling on the handle. After 5 rides I think I can say that this
exercise has helped my riding quite a bit. At first I wasn’t riding as fast but
after a few rides I was riding at about the same speed.

The biggest change, however has been in my breathing. By not pulling on the
handle all the time my rib cage in in a less restricted position and I find that
I am breathing more easily.

My main reason for riding on the trails on a regular basis is fitness. MUni is a
lot of fun, a great mental workout, and much easier on my old knees than
running. It is also a form of exercise in which I find it easy to find and then
stay just below the anaerobic threshold. Now that breathing is that much easier
I have been able to push a little harder without going anaerobic and I have
added a little extra distance to my daily one hour ride.

One more endorsement of MUniing. In an effort to stay fit as I edge toward old
age (still a ways to go) I have rowed, run cross country, biked, and played
basketball into my forties. Rowing takes more time than I have to spend now, and
there is just too much wear and tear on my knees to run (which is painful) or
play basketball(which hurts more). Bicycling takes too much time. I get what
feels like 2 or 3 times the workout MUniing as I do on a bike in the same period
of time. And I’m not risking the injuries associated with high speed bike
wrecks. (I have filled my lifetime quota of road rash.) Before I started MUniing
I almost had to force myself to go out for a bike ride or run, but I look
forward to my daily MUni ride. It’s just that much more fun.

Thanks for the advice,

John Hooten

Re: Muni technique question

Hi John

> I have a question about MUni riding technique.
>
> I have noticed that I have a tendency to hold onto the seat pretty much all
> the time while riding on trails. When I first started Muniing I held the seat
> with the left hand and balanced with the right. Now I switch hands constantly.
> I hold with the right hand and balance with the left when I am turning right,
> and hold with the left hand when turning left. If the wheel is drifting to one
> side or the other I try to correct it by holding the seat with hand opposite
> the drift. I don’t think I have as much control for dealing with unexpected
> bumps, etc. if I am not holding the seat. Is this a good idea? Would I be
> better off not holding onto the seat all the time? What do you think?

I would have said you are doing most things right. It is not good to get a
relience on holding the seat though. I would practice riding without holding the
seat as this improves your general muni skill level. If you are able to

react to the bad knocks without your hand hold, you will be able to ride the

impossible ones when you are holding on! It also gives you the ability to
use your arms for additional balance in difficult situations. Another
similar thing to practice is jumping and the transfer of weight without
holding on to the seat.

have fun

Roger
----------------------------------------------------
Roger.Davies@Octacon.co.uk
Stockton, North East England

For information on the Durham Juggling Festival
http://homepages.enterprise.net/mini/fest98.htm

           For information on The British Juggling Convention
            <a href="http://homepages.enterprise.net/mini/bjc12.html">http://homepages.enterprise.net/mini/bjc12.html</a>

Re: Muni technique question

John Hooten wrote:
>
> I have a question about MUni riding technique.
>
> I have noticed that I have a tendency to hold onto the seat pretty much all
> the time while riding on trails. When I first started Muniing I held the seat
> with the left hand and balanced with the right. Now I switch hands constantly.
> I hold with the right hand and balance with the left when I am turning right,
> and hold with the left hand when turning left. If the wheel is drifting to one
> side or the other I try to correct it by holding the seat with hand opposite
> the drift. I don’t think I have as much control for dealing with unexpected
> bumps, etc. if I am not holding the seat. Is this a good idea? Would I be
> better off not holding onto the seat all the time? What do you think?
>
> John Hooten
holding on to the seat can net you a lot of extra torque. So in sandy, muddy, or
very steep stuff, holding on is okay. And it’s okay for hopping and jumping. But
generally it is way cool to be hands off as much as possible. Throw the hands in
just when they’re needed.