muni suggestions

All right, spring is approaching, I know it. (It barely even snowed
yesterday here in Rochester.)

I know I’m going to be wanting to find some trails to ride on again soon.
Last year, I played in the woods on my 24" schwinn. That was fun, but I
think I could go for something a little better now… so, what have people
to say about the choices?

Based on my experience, I definintely need a 24" or larger wheel to be
happy. Everyone talks about the fat tires these days. How fat should I go?

Being that I have little experience in muni riding now, would it be
reasonable for me to get something with a decent frame, but less expensive
wheel, then later upgrading the wheel once I realize what I’ve been
missing? (I might be able to justify spending something in the $500 range,
but it’ll be a while before I can rationalize spending over a grand on a
single unicycle)

Oh yes, looking at Wilder, can people tell me, are there advantages to
Aluminum besides weight?

thanks, jeff lutkus


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

> Everyone talks about the fat tires these days. How fat should I go?
>

All the Way!!! (Personal preference, of course)

Really, the wheel is far more important than the frame. You’ll hardly
ever notice the frame you’re riding unless you’re doing 1-foot riding,
or unless you’ve got a really heavy (Schwinn) vs really light one . But
the wheel is everything. You don’t have to go for a fancy hub at this
point, (Suzue is a good starting point) but definitely start with the
fat tire and rim.

Why not make your own frame?

Chris

Jeff,

The least expensive starting point would be to get a Kenda 24 X 2.6 tire
for your Schwinn. It is fairly fat and inexpensive. You can get one from
Unicyclesource. This option has a quite a few disadvantages, but it will
get you started while you decide where you would like to go with this.

I would like to remind you that the most important thing is the rider. The
best unicycle in the world won’t make me Kris Holm; and Kris could ride
circles around most riders on a 24" Schwinn with a Kenda tire (not that he
would ride one). In UNiVERsE it sure looks like Dan Heaton is riding a
plain, old, heavy Pashley Muni on the North Shore, and riding it quite
well. That said, a good machine will help you to become a better rider.
And, I agree with Chris Reeder that the important thing is the wheel. The
Power Pashley from Unicyclesource http://www.unicyclesource.com/Pashley_C-
ycles_of_England_(4_models)21323.html comes with a Kovachi wheel with a
Suzue Hub and a Sun Mammoth 26 x 2.0 double-walled alloy rim. At $390 it
isn’t exactly cheap, but it’s a pretty good machine.

John Hooten

P.S. I don’t work for Unicycle source, or profit in any way from any sales
made by the Unicyclesource. JH

Jeff Lutkus wrote:

> All right, spring is approaching, I know it. (It barely even snowed
> yesterday here in Rochester.)
>
> I know I’m going to be wanting to find some trails to ride on again
> soon. Last year, I played in the woods on my 24" schwinn. That was fun,
> but I think I could go for something a little better now… so, what
> have people to say about the choices?
>
> Based on my experience, I definintely need a 24" or larger wheel to
> be happy. Everyone talks about the fat tires these days. How fat
> should I go?
>
> Being that I have little experience in muni riding now, would it be
> reasonable for me to get something with a decent frame, but less
> expensive wheel, then later upgrading the wheel once I realize what I’ve
> been missing? (I might be able to justify spending something in the $500
> range, but it’ll be a while before I can rationalize spending over a
> grand on a single unicycle)
>
> Oh yes, looking at Wilder, can people tell me, are there advantages to
> Aluminum besides weight?
>
> thanks, jeff lutkus
>
> _____________________________________________________________
> Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

It’s too bad about the S-7 rim. Your tire options are definetly limited.
Replacements for cottered cranks are pretty limited as well. I replaced my
old Schwinn S-7 rim and cottered crank hub with a Montey wheel setup.

A 24 X 3 tire won’t fit in a Pashley frame. For that matter a 26 X 2.65
Gazzolodi just barely fits. The wider tires definitely lets you ride
through more difficult terrain, but they had not yet been used when the
Pashley Muni came out. That’s one of the Pashley’s biggest drawbacks. If
you want to keep open the option of a really wide tire you will need a
different frame. Doing it for under $500 could be a challenge. I think a
24 X 3 tire would fit in a 26" Semcycle Deluxe frame. It may even fit in a
26" United frame. At Muni weekend Chris Reeder was riding a machine with a
Profile hub on what looked like a United frame with upgraded bearing
mounts welded on. You could investigate this or builing (or having built)
your own frame.

Good Luck,

John Hooten

Jeff Lutkus wrote:

> I tend to think upgrading my Schwinn would not necessarily be worth
> it… I’ve got a 20+ year old 24" I found on e-bay… The S-7 rim will
> not let me simply replace the tire… realistically, I’d end up getting
> a whole new wheel.
>
> So, if I’m going for a totally new uni, I’d probably want to go for one
> that I can easily upgrade the tire, or even wheel.
>
> Can I realistically compare a 24x3 tire to a 26x2.6, or does the change
> in diameter make this totally different? If I were to go with the
> pashley, would I be disappointed later on if I wanted to upgrade to a
> wider tire?
>
> Too bad I can’t just go to my local cycle shop and try a few out.
>
> good day,
>
> jeff lutkus
>
> — John Hooten <jhooten@rcsis.com>
>
> > wrote:
>
> >Jeff,
>
> >
>
> >The least expensive starting point would be to get a Kenda 24 X 2.6
> >tire for your Schwinn. It is fairly fat and inexpensive. You can get
> >one from Unicyclesource. This option has a quite a few disadvantages,
> >but it will get you started while you decide where you would like to go
> >with this.
>
> >
>
> >I would like to remind you that the most important thing is the rider.
> >The best unicycle in the world won’t make me Kris Holm; and Kris could
> >ride circles around most riders on a 24" Schwinn with a Kenda tire (not
> >that he would ride one). In UNiVERsE it sure looks like Dan Heaton is
> >riding a plain, old, heavy Pashley Muni on the North Shore, and riding
> >it quite well. That
>
> >said, a good machine will help you to become a better rider. And, I
> >agree with Chris Reeder that the important thing is the wheel. The
> >Power Pashley from Unicyclesource
>
> >http://www.unicyclesource.com/Pashley_Cycles_of_England_(4_models)213-
> >23.html
>
> >comes with a Kovachi wheel with a Suzue Hub and a Sun Mammoth 26 x 2.0
> >double-walled alloy rim. At $390 it isn’t exactly cheap, but it’s a
> >pretty good machine.
>
> >
>
> >John Hooten
>
> >
>
> >P.S. I don’t work for Unicycle source, or profit in any way from any
> > sales made by the Unicyclesource.
>
> >JH
>
> >
>
> >Jeff Lutkus wrote:
>
> >
>
> >> All right, spring is approaching, I know it. (It barely even snowed
> >> yesterday here in Rochester.)
>
> >>
>
> >> I know I’m going to be wanting to find some trails to ride on again
> >> soon. Last year, I played in the woods on my 24" schwinn. That was
> >> fun, but I think I could go for something a little better now… so,
> >> what have people to say about the choices?
>
> >>
>
> >> Based on my experience, I definintely need a 24" or larger wheel to
> >> be happy. Everyone talks about the fat tires these days. How fat
> >> should I go?
>
> >>
>
> >> Being that I have little experience in muni riding now, would it be
> >> reasonable for me to get something with a decent frame, but less
> >> expensive wheel, then later upgrading the wheel once I realize what
> >> I’ve been missing? (I might be able to justify spending something in
> >> the $500 range, but it’ll be a while before I can rationalize
> >> spending over a grand on a single unicycle)
>
> >>
>
> >> Oh yes, looking at Wilder, can people tell me, are there advantages
> >> to Aluminum besides weight?
>
> >>
>
> >> thanks,
>
> >> jeff lutkus
>
> >>
>
> >> _____________________________________________________________
>
> >> Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com
>
> _____________________________________________________________
> Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

Yeah… my Schwinn has been good to me… I basically learned to ride on
it, and now only use it for things I’d be afraid of breaking my good uni
on. I was just thinking about going for a whole new uni… but if I could
get some more life out of the Schwinn frame, I’d consider replacing the
wheel. Does anyone know what the largest (and fattest) tire a 24" schwinn
frame can fit?

jl

— John Hooten <jhooten@rcsis.com>
> wrote: It’s too bad about the S-7 rim. Your tire options are definetly
> limited. Replacements for cottered cranks are pretty limited as well. I
> replaced my old Schwinn S-7 rim and cottered crank hub with a Montey
> wheel setup.
>
>A 24 X 3 tire won’t fit in a Pashley frame. For that matter a 26 X 2.65
>Gazzolodi just barely fits. The wider tires definitely lets you ride
>through more difficult terrain, but they had not yet been used when the
>Pashley Muni came out. That’s one of the Pashley’s biggest drawbacks. If
>you want to keep open the option of a really wide tire you will need a
>different frame. Doing it for under $500 could be a challenge. I think a
>24 X 3 tire would fit in a 26" Semcycle Deluxe frame. It may even fit in
>a 26" United frame. At Muni weekend Chris Reeder was riding a machine
>with a Profile hub on what looked like a United frame with upgraded
>bearing mounts welded on. You could investigate this or builing (or
>having built) your own frame.
>
>Good Luck,
>
>John Hooten
>
>Jeff Lutkus wrote:
>
>> I tend to think upgrading my Schwinn would not necessarily be worth
>> it… I’ve got a 20+ year old 24" I found on e-bay… The S-7 rim will
>> not let me simply replace the tire… realistically, I’d end up getting
>> a whole new wheel.
>>
>> So, if I’m going for a totally new uni, I’d probably want to go for one
>> that I can easily upgrade the tire, or even wheel.
>>
>> Can I realistically compare a 24x3 tire to a 26x2.6, or does the change
>> in diameter make this totally different? If I were to go with the
>> pashley, would I be disappointed later on if I wanted to upgrade to a
>> wider tire?
>>
>> Too bad I can’t just go to my local cycle shop and try a few out.
>>
>> good day,
>>
>> jeff lutkus
>>
>> — John Hooten <jhooten@rcsis.com>
>>
>> > wrote:
>>
>> >Jeff,
>>
>> >
>>
>> >The least expensive starting point would be to get a Kenda 24 X 2.6
>> >tire for your Schwinn. It is fairly fat and inexpensive. You can get
>> >one from Unicyclesource. This option has a quite a few disadvantages,
>> >but it will get you started while you decide where you would like to
>> >go with this.
>>
>> >
>>
>> >I would like to remind you that the most important thing is the rider.
>> >The best unicycle in the world won’t make me Kris Holm; and Kris could
>> >ride circles around most riders on a 24" Schwinn with a Kenda tire
>> >(not that he would ride one). In UNiVERsE it sure looks like Dan
>> >Heaton is riding a plain, old, heavy Pashley Muni on the North Shore,
>> >and riding it quite well. That
>>
>> >said, a good machine will help you to become a better rider. And, I
>> >agree with Chris Reeder that the important thing is the wheel. The
>> >Power Pashley from Unicyclesource
>>
>> >http://www.unicyclesource.com/Pashley_Cycles_of_England_(4_models)213-
>> >23.html
>>
>> >comes with a Kovachi wheel with a Suzue Hub and a Sun Mammoth 26 x 2.0
>> >double-walled alloy rim. At $390 it isn’t exactly cheap, but it’s a
>> >pretty good machine.
>>
>> >
>>
>> >John Hooten
>>
>> >
>>
>> >P.S. I don’t work for Unicycle source, or profit in any way from any
>> > sales made by the Unicyclesource.
>>
>> >JH
>>
>> >
>>
>> >Jeff Lutkus wrote:
>>
>> >
>>
>> >> All right, spring is approaching, I know it. (It barely even snowed
>> >> yesterday here in Rochester.)
>>
>> >>
>>
>> >> I know I’m going to be wanting to find some trails to ride on again
>> >> soon. Last year, I played in the woods on my 24" schwinn. That was
>> >> fun, but I think I could go for something a little better now… so,
>> >> what have people to say about the choices?
>>
>> >>
>>
>> >> Based on my experience, I definintely need a 24" or larger wheel to
>> >> be happy. Everyone talks about the fat tires these days. How fat
>> >> should I go?
>>
>> >>
>>
>> >> Being that I have little experience in muni riding now, would it be
>> >> reasonable for me to get something with a decent frame, but less
>> >> expensive wheel, then later upgrading the wheel once I realize what
>> >> I’ve been missing? (I might be able to justify spending something in
>> >> the $500 range, but it’ll be a while before I can rationalize
>> >> spending over a grand on a single unicycle)
>>
>> >>
>>
>> >> Oh yes, looking at Wilder, can people tell me, are there advantages
>> >> to Aluminum besides weight?
>>
>> >>
>>
>> >> thanks,
>>
>> >> jeff lutkus
>>
>> >>
>>
>> >> _____________________________________________________________
>>
>> >> Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com
>>
>> _____________________________________________________________
>> Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

I was in the same position with my old Schwinn (cottered cranks, s-7,
etc) and I just replaced the wheel and cranks with new ones from Schwinn.
I think it cost around US$50 or so. The new wheel isn’t particularly
strong or light (it has a single-wall steel rim), but it’ll at least hold
a 2.6" tire. I haven’t tried anything wider; the frame would fit a 3"
tire, I’m sure, but I don’t think the rim is quite wide enough for that
large of a tire.

Anyway, the setup was all right; now it’s my son’s muni, with a 2.1" tire
currently (he didn’t like the squishy 2.6). I’m too big and fat (6’1" &
220 lbs) for that uni (it took a lot of maintenance), but not for my
Telford (which only asks for the occasional wash and polish).

Peter Kittle English Education Adviser Department of English CSU, Chico
Chico CA 95929-0830 ph: 530/898-5305 fax: 530/898-4450 email:
pkittle@csuchico.edu www: http://www.csuchico.edu/~pkittle

> ----------
> From: Jeff Lutkus Reply To: Jeff Lutkus Sent: Friday, April 20, 2001
> 10:49 AM To: unicycling@winternet.com Subject: Re: muni suggestions
>
> Yeah… my Schwinn has been good to me… I basically learned to ride on
> it, and now only use it for things I’d be afraid of breaking my good uni
> on. I was just thinking about going for a whole new uni… but if I
> could get some more life out of the Schwinn frame, I’d consider
> replacing the wheel. Does anyone know what the largest (and fattest)
> tire a 24" schwinn frame can fit?
>
> jl
>
>
> — John Hooten <jhooten@rcsis.com>
> > wrote: It’s too bad about the S-7 rim. Your tire options are definetly
> > limited.
> Replacements for cottered cranks are pretty limited as well. I replaced
> my old Schwinn S-7 rim and cottered crank hub with a Montey wheel setup.
> >
> >A 24 X 3 tire won’t fit in a Pashley frame. For that matter a 26 X 2.65
> Gazzolodi just barely fits. The wider tires definitely lets you ride
> through more difficult terrain, but they had not yet been used when the
> Pashley Muni came out. That’s one of the Pashley’s biggest drawbacks. If
> you want to keep open the option of a really wide tire you will need a
> different frame. Doing it
> >for under $500 could be a challenge. I think a 24 X 3 tire would
> >fit in a
> 26" Semcycle Deluxe frame. It may even fit in a 26" United frame. At
> Muni weekend Chris Reeder was riding a machine with a Profile hub on
> what looked like a United frame with upgraded bearing mounts welded on.
> You could investigate this or builing (or having built) your own frame.
> >
> >Good Luck,
> >
> >John Hooten
> >
> >Jeff Lutkus wrote:
> >
> >> I tend to think upgrading my Schwinn would not necessarily be worth
> it… I’ve got a 20+ year old 24" I found on e-bay… The S-7 rim will
> not let me simply replace the tire… realistically, I’d end up
> getting a whole new wheel.
> >>
> >> So, if I’m going for a totally new uni, I’d probably want to go
> >> for one
> that I can easily upgrade the tire, or even wheel.
> >>
> >> Can I realistically compare a 24x3 tire to a 26x2.6, or does the
> >> change
> in diameter make this totally different? If I were to go with the
> pashley, would I be disappointed later on if I wanted to upgrade to a
> wider tire?
> >>
> >> Too bad I can’t just go to my local cycle shop and try a few out.
> >>
> >> good day,
> >>
> >> jeff lutkus
> >>
> >> — John Hooten <jhooten@rcsis.com>
> >>
> >> > wrote:
> >>
> >> >Jeff,
> >>
> >> >
> >>
> >> >The least expensive starting point would be to get a Kenda 24 X 2.6
> tire for your Schwinn. It is fairly fat and inexpensive. You can get
> one from Unicyclesource. This option has a quite a few disadvantages,
> but it will get you started while you decide where you would like to go
> with this.
> >>
> >> >
> >>
> >> >I would like to remind you that the most important thing is the
> >> >rider.
> The best unicycle in the world won’t make me Kris Holm; and Kris could
> ride circles around most riders on a 24" Schwinn with a Kenda tire (not
> that he would ride one). In UNiVERsE it sure looks like Dan Heaton is
> riding a plain, old, heavy Pashley Muni on the North Shore, and riding
> it quite well. That
> >>
> >> >said, a good machine will help you to become a better rider. And, I
> agree with Chris Reeder that the important thing is the wheel. The Power
> Pashley from Unicyclesource
> >>
> >>
> >http://www.unicyclesource.com/Pashley_Cycles_of_England_(4_models)-
> >21323.h
> tml
> >>
> >> >comes with a Kovachi wheel with a Suzue Hub and a Sun Mammoth 26
> >> >x 2.0
> double-walled alloy rim. At $390 it isn’t exactly cheap, but it’s a
> pretty good machine.
> >>
> >> >
> >>
> >> >John Hooten
> >>
> >> >
> >>
> >> >P.S. I don’t work for Unicycle source, or profit in any way from any
> sales made by the Unicyclesource.
> >>
> >> >JH
> >>
> >> >
> >>
> >> >Jeff Lutkus wrote:
> >>
> >> >
> >>
> >> >> All right, spring is approaching, I know it. (It barely even
> >> >> snowed
> yesterday here in Rochester.)
> >>
> >> >>
> >>
> >> >> I know I’m going to be wanting to find some trails to ride on
> >> >> again
> soon. Last year, I played in the woods on my 24" schwinn. That was fun,
> but I think I could go for something a little better now… so, what
> have people to say about the choices?
> >>
> >> >>
> >>
> >> >> Based on my experience, I definintely need a 24" or larger wheel
> >> >> to
> be happy. Everyone talks about the fat tires these days. How fat
> should I go?
> >>
> >> >>
> >>
> >> >> Being that I have little experience in muni riding now, would it
> >> >> be
> reasonable for me to get something with a decent frame, but less
> expensive wheel, then later upgrading the wheel once I realize what I’ve
> been missing? (I might be able to justify spending something in the $500
> range, but it’ll be a while before I can rationalize spending over a
> grand on a single unicycle)
> >>
> >> >>
> >>
> >> >> Oh yes, looking at Wilder, can people tell me, are there
> >> >> advantages
> to Aluminum besides weight?
> >>
> >> >>
> >>
> >> >> thanks,
> >>
> >> >> jeff lutkus
> >>
> >> >>
> >>
> >> >> _____________________________________________________________
> >>
> >> >> Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com
> >>
> >> _____________________________________________________________
> >> Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com
>
> _____________________________________________________________
> Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

John Hooten wrote:

> If you want to keep open the option of a really wide tire you will need
> a different frame. Doing it for under $500 could be a challenge.

Actually, this is possible. My muni has a 24x3 wheelset and the parts cost
me around $350. It’s not the “ultimate dream muni”, but it rides great and
it got me out on the trails a lot sooner then waiting until I could afford
something better.

I used a Miyata saddle and a 24x3 Kovachi-built wheelset (Sun DoubleWide,
Nokian Gazz tire, Suzue hub) from Unicycle Source. For a frame, I got a
24" United and Chris Reeder welded in some 2" extensions to it making it
fit the 24x3 tire (actually 26" tall).

It’s working fine, but the tire only has about about 1/8" clearance on
each side, so it’s really tight. If the tire deflates too much, it rubs
the frame. If I get into even a hint of mud, it’s scraping off the tire on
the frame making a racket and getting all over me.

At some point, I’d like to upgrade the frame, but for my current budget,
it’s working great. <grin>

Greg