Muni question

I’ve been trying out some rocky trails with my 28" uni with 150mm cranks
and 2.1" semi-knobby tire. It’s not the ideal setup for Muni but I wanted
to try it out before getting something more suitable. (BTW, this trail is
the Barton Creek trail in Austin, TX. Seems to be very popular with
mountain-bikers).

I’m doing slow half-revolutions through the rocky patches, threading my
way around the larger rocks, and many times I’ll hit an unexpected rock,
push hard, and I’ll fall forward instead of going forward. How do I
overcome these rocks?

A lot of people on the trail seem really amazed that I would try this. One
woman said, “A mountain bike unicycle, holy crap!”. Makes it hard for me
to concentrate on staying up.

Wow, a 28" with 150’s…thats tuff stuff. The first thing I would recomend is getting a set of 175’s (cranks) for that monster. That is , of course, if you want to use it for muni alot, but from the sounds of it you dont want to. I personally think it would be really good for racing on hardpack, which would be great for the sport, well, if you ‘actually’ raced that is. If, however, you want to be more normal (and lets face it, if your riding a unicycle thats already out of the question;) ) and get a smaller uni for muni:D ,what I would recomend is when you first hit the bump hold the seat as tight as you can, stand up, put all of your weight on the forward crank, and do a semi-hop over the object.

But I still think it would be cool to race with the 28. I race mt. bikers on technical stuff and up hills on a 24 and I usually win: You could do alot!!!

Avery

It’s not the ideal setup for Muni but I wanted
to try it out before getting something more suitable.

i could be wrong,but im pretty sure the Pashley 28
’ is the same frame as the MUni versions.So if this is the case all you would need is a new wheel and you could have a split personallity uni

I might have a set of 175mm Profile 3-piece cranks for sale. :wink:

“catfishtongue” <forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:a0jfdn$fj7$1@laurel.tc.umn.edu
> Wow, a 28" with 150’s…thats tuff stuff. The first thing I would
> recomend is getting a set of 175’s (cranks) for that monster. That is ,
> of course, if you want to use it for muni alot, but from the sounds of
> it you dont want to. I personally think it would be really good for
> racing on hardpack, which would be great for the sport, well, if you
> ‘actually’ raced that is. If, however, you want to be more normal (and
> lets face it, if your riding a unicycle thats already out of the
> question ) and get a smaller uni for muni:D ,what I would recomend is
> when you first hit the bump hold the seat as tight as you can, stand
> up, put all of your weight on the forward crank, and do a semi-hop over
> the object.

Thanks, I’ll have to try that when I finally learn how to hop. It seems
like these rocks are mostly unexpected and I have little time to react
after I hit them. I’ve been experimenting with going faster and holding
the seat, and that seems to work much better than the half-revolutions
over some stretches of rock.

I’ll probably get a full-time Muni eventually and leave the 28" for
trail riding.

> But I still think it would be cool to race with the 28. I race mt.
> bikers on technical stuff and up hills on a 24 and I usually win: You
> could do alot!!!

I’d like to get to the point where I could beat some
mt. bikers on the trail, or at least go over some sections where the mt.
bikers have to dismount! This trail is really rough in many spots and
it’s 8 miles long.

fyi: I just sent an email to your hotmail account. I live close to Austin
area. I’ll be buying a unicycle fairly soon.

Well, Hotmail just bounced the email back to me, indicating your Hotmail
account is inactive. Can you contact me at my Hotmail account? My user id
is: webaviancb

Thanks. -cb

> I’m doing slow half-revolutions through the rocky patches, threading my
> way around the larger rocks, and many times I’ll hit an unexpected rock,
> push hard, and I’ll fall forward instead of going forward. How do I
> overcome these rocks?

You have to know they’re there. In a pure field of rocks, such as what
George Peck rides in his video, it’s hard to keep track of every contour
of your riding surface. But if you’re on a trail you have to learn to
mentally digest what you see on the trail and convert it to pedaling
information to get you over (or around) it.

Naturally longer cranks will help as well. 150 on a 28" wheel might
even be a little short for me, and I’m known for using short cranks
(150 on 26").

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“If it weren’t for the last minute, nothing would get done.” - Kevin
“Gilby” Gilbertson