Muni on a whim

There I was content in all aspects. Moving along on the local bike trail. Having
finally mastered the simple freemount and feeling comfortable with my skills.
Thanks to my on line mentor Rick Bissell. (thanks Rick!!!) When off to my left
was a dirt path leading up a steep hill, gravel everywhere, exposed roots an
obvious mountain bike path. Now what type of fellow would I be if I passed up
this little challenge? I made it up about three quarters of the way (100 feet)
before I could not move the uni anymore. To much of a grade, or probally me
standing in the pedals to get some forward motion. Over I went and tumbled back
to the bottom. Grinning all of the way down. When the dust settled I tried again
same results. Except this time I leaped off and landed on my feet instead of
posterior. What a blast. Never made it up all of the way but I had a hoot
trying. So now I ride across the grass and non paths with reckless abandon.
Bouncing around and making an idiot of myself, loving every minute of it though.

Question, do you munis hold on to your seat to give you more force uphill. Down
hill is okay but when the grade and bumps get to much I find myself standing in
the pedals which makes it worse for me.

Joe

RE: Muni on a whim

> >Question, do you munis hold on to your seat to give you more force uphill.
>
> Yes we do, though “no hands” is considered more elegant. Holding onto the seat
> gives you the ability to force yourself into a straight line, and allows you
> to put incredible power to the pedals.

Elegant yes, but I (most of the time) put comfort ahead of elegance. Pressing
down on the seat reduces your crotch weight on it. So aside from the clear
benefits gained by holding the seat rigid while you pedal, you can also go more
miles in comfort.

Or kilometers.

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone (reply to jfoss@unicycling.com)
http://www.unicycling.com

“I’m okay, I crash like that a lot.”

  • Dan Heaton

Re: Muni on a whim

>Question, do you munis hold on to your seat to give you more force uphill.

Yes we do, though “no hands” is considered more elegant. Holding onto the seat
gives you the ability to force yourself into a straight line, and allows you to
put incredible power to the pedals.

A couple of notes: Take care to put force on the rear pedal as well as the
forward pedal. Control is essential on an uphill slope. You need to avoid
spinning out. Second, try to use your weight, not your pedal force. This is a
hint I got from George Peck in North Bend, and it really helps. Lean far
forward–don’t muscle everything.

David Maxfield Bainbridge Island, WA