Mounting the thing

OK, so my riding is getting better. I can now go around 30 feet everytime I get
on, to be honest I’m running out of room. I’ve already got to move the car out
of the drive before I start practising. Anyway, I’m starting to get a bit bored
with just doing that so I’m looking to start learning other things in
parallel…like unassisted mounts.

Far as I can see this is the sort of method used:-

  1. Settle saddle between the legs and arrange the pedals to be at about 10 to 4.
  2. Place foot on nearest pedal and push down which makes the uni move backwards.
  3. As I rise off the ground, put the other foot on the other pedal.

TARAAA!! I’m mounted but I’m in the stale position, pedals at 6 O’clock and I
can’t move.

  1. Fall off.

Is this normal?

jon.


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Re: Mounting the thing

Sounds about normal to me. I learned to idle, ride backwards, and
freemount all at about the same time. There are skills used in all of
these that work together.

So you made it to the 6:00/12:00 position. Now, use your top foot to snap the
pedal backwards to about 4:00/10:00 and from there, go forward.

Ok, I konw it’s easier said than done. Work on the motion with a wall, then
once you understand how the motion goes, you’ll be able to do it without the
help of a wall.

cheers, jeff lutkus

— “Jon Wyatt” <samur2@hotmail.com>
> wrote:

>Far as I can see this is the sort of method used:-
>
>1. Settle saddle between the legs and arrange the pedals to be at about
> 10 to 4.
>2. Place foot on nearest pedal and push down which makes the uni move
> backwards.
>3. As I rise off the ground, put the other foot on the other pedal.
>
>TARAAA!! I’m mounted but I’m in the stale position, pedals at 6 O’clock and I
>can’t move.
>
>4. Fall off.
>
>
>Is this normal?
>
>jon.
>_________________________________________________________________________
>Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com.


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Re: Mounting the thing

samur2@hotmail.com writes:
>r as I can see this is the sort of method used:-
>
>1. Settle saddle between the legs and arrange the pedals to be at about
> 10 to 4.
>2. Place foot on nearest pedal and push down which makes the uni move
> backwards.
>3. As I rise off the ground, put the other foot on the other pedal.

There are a variety of methods to mount, and the one used often depends on the
situation – like if you are in a rush, you are not going to want ot ‘idle
mount’ (which is where you rock backwards 1/2 rev first).

But step two has a huge and fairly easily avoided flaw: Do not push down on the
nearest pedal. Instead, FREEZE THAT LEG and shift your weight forward as you put
(jump) your other foot onto the front pedal. Now doven. For those of you not
familiar with davening, this means lean forward at the waist. At this point,
your momentum will be shifting forward, so just ride.

Happy Passover to those of you who doven regularly.

David

PS: The method that involves idling backwards 1/2 rev first is probably harder
to a beginner.

Re: Mounting the thing

>From: “David Stone” <dstone@packer.edu> David
>
>PS: The method that involves idling backwards 1/2 rev first is probably harder
> to a beginner.
>

Yes, thanks to everyone that has pointed this out. I was attempting to ride
forwards immediately rather than moving backwards 1/4 stroke before setting off.

I’ll try both these methods now.

cheers.

jon.


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Re: Mounting the thing

http://www.unicycling.org/unicycling/mounts/freemount.html says that you should
try hard to put your weight on the seat as you mount not on the pedal so the
unicycle doesn’t roll whilst you are mounting, thus leaving the pedals in the
same place.

However, the method described on that page, starting with the cranks horizontal
is probably going to get you some really bruised shins when you mess up, I’d
never mount with the lower pedal higher than 4 o’clock myself.

I mount pretty much like you are trying to, although sometimes (mainly on
rough terrain) I’ll mount with the pedal right down so the unicycle doesn’t
move at all.

When I was learning this one I tried practicing getting onto the unicycle and
just sitting on it, with the pedals at six o’clock until I fell off. With a
little practice you should be able to do this for about half a second or so most
times. Once you’ve got that one sorted, it isn’t too hard to turn the pedals to
start yourself. This bit is mainly about learning to keep pressure on the pedal
all the way round rather than just pushing down with each foot in turn. Try hard
to make sure you are doing that while you are riding, it makes riding easier and
is also pretty vital for idling.

hope thats helpful,

Joe

“Jon Wyatt” <samur2@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:F99fC8aH5qRFapNuT1F000066b1@hotmail.com
>
>
> OK, so my riding is getting better. I can now go around 30 feet everytime
I
> get on, to be honest I’m running out of room. I’ve already got to move the car
> out of the drive before I start practising. Anyway, I’m starting to
get
> a bit bored with just doing that so I’m looking to start learning other things
> in parallel…like unassisted mounts.
>
> Far as I can see this is the sort of method used:-
>
> 1. Settle saddle between the legs and arrange the pedals to be at about 10
> to 4.
> 2. Place foot on nearest pedal and push down which makes the uni move
> backwards.
> 3. As I rise off the ground, put the other foot on the other pedal.
>
> TARAAA!! I’m mounted but I’m in the stale position, pedals at 6 O’clock
and
> I can’t move.
>
> 4. Fall off.
>
>
> Is this normal?
>
> jon.
> _________________________________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com.

RE: Mounting the thing

> http://www.unicycling.org/unicycling/mounts/freemount.html says that you
> should try hard to put your weight on the seat as you mount not on the pedal
> so the unicycle doesn’t roll whilst you are mounting, thus leaving the pedals
> in the same place.

It’s hard to put your weight on the seat until you have both feet on the pedals.
The basic method described above is definitely the easiest way to mount, but not
necessarily the easiest to learn.

The key to doing it is getting on the unicycle without the pedals moving, and
without one pedal being at the bottom. Some people learn this very easily, and
others just can’t get the wheel to hold still while they step on.

It’s hard for me to remember learning this. It’s so easy now I have trouble
describing it to learners. All you do is keep your knee bent where it is. If
your knee doesn’t straighten or bend more, the pedal will not move. Bend your
leg a little bit and then stand on it. That’s it!

When I first learned this skill, I remember thinking I was doing a delicate
balancing act, applying just enough pressure on the pedal to keep it from going
up or down. This is probably what it feels like when you get it right. When I do
it today, I don’t feel anything delicate at all, just my leg not letting the
pedal move.

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com www.unicycling.com

“Are they going to use parachutes?” – my nephew Cameron, 8, watching skydivers
come out of the plane at the Beale Air Show

Re: RE: Mounting the thing

john_foss@asinet.com writes:
>The key to doing it is getting on the unicycle without the pedals moving, and
>without one pedal being at the bottom. Some people learn this very easily, and
>others just can’t get the wheel to hold still while they step on.
I mentioned this in a recent post as ‘freezing your leg.’ I have found that
kids tend to do this naturally! My daughter and many of her friends never
thought to push the pedal down (they were all 4 at the time).
>
>
>It’s hard for me to remember learning this. It’s so easy now I have trouble
>describing it to learners. All you do is keep your knee bent where it is. If
>your knee doesn’t straighten or bend more, the pedal will not move. Bend your
>leg a little bit and then stand on it. That’s it!
Don’t forget to doven!

David

Re: Mounting the thing

On 12 Apr 2001 09:43:35 -0700, john_foss@asinet.com (John Foss) wrote:

>> http://www.unicycling.org/unicycling/mounts/freemount.html says that you
>> should try hard to put your weight on the seat as you mount not on the pedal
>> so the unicycle doesn’t roll whilst you are mounting, thus leaving the pedals
>> in the same place.
>
>It’s hard to put your weight on the seat until you have both feet on the
>pedals. The basic method described above is definitely the easiest way to
>mount, but not necessarily the easiest to learn.
>
>The key to doing it is getting on the unicycle without the pedals moving, and
>without one pedal being at the bottom. Some people learn this very easily, and
>others just can’t get the wheel to hold still while they step on.
>
>It’s hard for me to remember learning this. It’s so easy now I have trouble
>describing it to learners. All you do is keep your knee bent where it is.

I have mastered the freemount fairly recently and before that I struggled quite
a while with exactly this problem of the wheel kicking back too much. Many
people kindly gave advice like “freeze that leg” or indeed “put your weight on
the seat”, but it fell on barren ground. I just could not suppress my reflex to
stand on that second leg, as if you step onto something rigid.

What finally did the trick for me was to concentrate on the requirement that my
second foot had to catch the pedal in exactly the location where it (i.e. the
pedal) was just prior to the mount. This may be very personal but maybe it works
for others too.

Klaas Bil

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “Aldrich Ames, encryption, Sudan”

Re: Mounting the thing

In article <F99fC8aH5qRFapNuT1F000066b1@hotmail.com>, samur2@hotmail.com
(Jon Wyatt) writes:

>Far as I can see this is the sort of method used:-
>
>1. Settle saddle between the legs and arrange the pedals to be at about
> 10 to 4.
>2. Place foot on nearest pedal and push down which makes the uni move
> backwards.
>3. As I rise off the ground, put the other foot on the other pedal.

If you do this on a downhill slope you will find it much easier because
the wheel will require far more pressure to make it move backwards,
thereby giving you more control and enabling you to “climb up” onto the
seat as you find the point of balance. Then you don’t even have to pedal
away, just allow the uni to roll downhill with you riding it. As you get
better you just practise on less of a slope and then uphill :slight_smile:

I showed someone this method yesterday and he was successful after 5
minutes (having spent the past 12 months failing) This technique tends
to make you develop the rolling mount where the uni does not go
backwards at all, which is what I seem to use mostly and is the best for
uphill starts and Muni.

Best of luck

Jerry Cooper

Re: Mounting the thing

>From: inspark@aol.com (InsPark) If you do this on a downhill slope you
>will find it much easier because the wheel will require far more pressure
>to make it move backwards, thereby giving you more control and enabling
>you to “climb up” onto the seat as you find the

I actually came up with my own idea for this. I put a brick behind the
wheel and mounted that way, I can succesfully get on and ride away quite
happily using this method but am still having problems pedalling backwards
if I move the brick.

One thing I was doing wrong was making the backpedal and set off forwards
movement quite slow.

I found things much easier when the backpedal and then the move forwards
is done in one very quick sharp movement. I have managed to move away
(without the brick) a good 3 or 4 times now. :wink:

thanks,

jon.


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