mounting a 5' unicycle

I can mount my 5’ unicycle off the back of my pick-up truck. By
accident I figured out how to mount it with the aid of a stop sign. How
do I free mount it without the aid of a sign or platform, without
braking my leg or arm?

I normally mount it like a small unicycle. Since it is much taller I
have to run (with the cycle in front of me) and then jump on the pedals
and use the momentum to swing upwards. If you are too slow you will come
down again backwards, if you are too fast you will overtravel the top
and fall forwards, when you get it right you will just use the swing to
start cycling.

Chris

“Jeff” <sarajeff@usa.net> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:3AF63055.EEB09586@usa.net
> I can mount my 5’ unicycle off the back of my pick-up truck. By
accident
> I figured out how to mount it with the aid of a stop sign. How do I
free
> mount it without the aid of a sign or platform, without braking my
leg
> or arm?

learning to free mount a giraffe is probably the most painful trick ive learned.

i mount left footed. to do this i hold the uni up not quite vertical but leaning a little forward. left pedal in the down position. well, not quite all the way down ya want it a little forward too. left hand on the front of the seat. right on the rear. step on the tire with your right foot then put your left foot on the left pedal and sit on the seat swinging your right foot around to the right pedal. make any sense?

as you’ll discover, its pretty important to get your right hand out of the way or youll tweak your wrist. what hurt me the most in learning this was scraping my ankles on the cranks. i picked up some shin guards for playing soccer that have ankle protection too. they work great.

the key to free mounting a giraffe is springing yourself STRAIGHT up and using lots of SPEED to do it. i try to imagine a rope pulling up on my spine to help shoot straight up.

it took me for ever to finally get it down but its a worth while thing to learn as theres not always a pick up truck or a stop sign handy.

hope i was some help. if anything was not clear feel free to e mail me. good luck.

Here’s what I do:

left foot on wheel. Lift right foot from ground to right pedal. Lift left
foot from wheel, and begin moving it towards left pedal. Sit down. Place
left foot on left pedal. Ride off :slight_smile:

See video clip:
http://lutkus.org/juggle/photos/video/jeff_lutkus_freemount1.mpg

Alternate method. I think this one is a little easier, though, I don’t
practice it, so I’m not very good: right foot on right pedal. Lift left
foot from ground towards left pedal. Sit down. Left foot on left pedal.
Ride off. http://lutkus.org/juggle/photos/video/jeff_lutkus_freemount2.mpg

Now, what I would be interested to learn is how to mount assisted by
people or objects. I can mount with the aid of a wall. I have yet to
figure out how to use antyhing which would raise me off the ground (ie:
back of a pickup truck) or anything whith isn’t tall and flat like a wall.

jeff lutkus

— Jeff <sarajeff@usa.net>
> wrote: I can mount my 5’ unicycle off the back of my pick-up truck. By
> accident I figured out how to mount it with the aid of a stop sign. How
> do I free mount it without the aid of a sign or platform, without
> braking my leg or arm?


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

christianveit@dingoblue.net.au writes:
>I normally mount it like a small unicycle. Since it is much taller I
>have to run (with the cycle in front of me) and then jump on the pedals
>and use the momentum to swing upwards. If you are too slow you will come
>down again backwards, if you are too fast you will overtravel the top
>and fall forwards, when you get it right you will just use the swing to
>start cycling.
>
>Chris
>
>“Jeff” <sarajeff@usa.net> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
>news:3AF63055.EEB09586@usa.net
>> I can mount my 5’ unicycle off the back of my pick-up truck. By

>accident
>> I figured out how to mount it with the aid of a stop sign. How do I

>free
>> mount it without the aid of a sign or platform, without braking my

>leg
>> or arm?
I read a few people’s comments about mounting a 5’ giraffe, and I must add
my 2 cents.

The absolutely easiest way for an adult male of average height is simply
to jump mount the thing, as Chris (above) notes. I would add a piece of
advice from a man who ONLY rides a giraffe for many years now: as you are
in md-jump (tush on the seat, one foot on the pedal), stick out your
chest; it sorta forces you into the right frame of mind and forces you NOT
to lean back. I got this on the 2nd try and can now do it on a 6’ giraffe
with some regularity.

Another note: It really helps to backpedal 1/2 rev or so in order to get
that trailing foot into the right place.

David

Jeff <sarajeff@usa.net> wrote: I can mount my 5’ unicycle off the back of
my pick-up truck. By accident I figured out how to mount it with the aid
of a stop sign. How do I free mount it without the aid of a sign or
platform, without braking my leg or arm?

for a description on how to free mount a giraffe:
http://www.unicycling.org/unicycling/mg.html

As to safety tips, Giraffes are pretty safe unless you fall sideways. On a
5ft giraffe you are only really 2ft higher than on a normal unicycle.
That’s the equivalent of standing on a stool. (Unfortunately for you in
this case its a pretty unstable stool :slight_smile: Giraffes are easier to stay on
in some ways because you have more time to react to falling.

The main cause of injuries is falling sideways. If this happens it is very
easy to land on one ankle and then fold it. To avoid this, twist when
falling so that you either fall forwards or backwards (so you can land on
both feet).

It helps a lot to get on with a wall and practice dismounting lots, both
with the unicycle in front and behind. After doing this a bunch of times
you’ll realise that falling off a 5ft giraffe isn’t much of an issue. Once
the fear factor is gone practicing free mounting becomes a lot easier.

Another exercise which may help is to practice mounting a normal unicycle
in the same manner that you finish a giraffe mount. Get your normal uni,
place one pedal at its lowest position and then place your foot on it.
Now mount the uni by using an upward motion, placing your other foot onto
the other pedal and pulling yourself up on to the seat. It will be easier
to begin with if you lower the seat a little (and don’t try this with
baggy pants!)

The key here is to practice mounting with upward motion rather than
having the wheel moving underneath you. This mimics the last bit of a
giraffe mount and should help you get used to the vertical motion and
balance required.

o o Peter Bier o O o Juggler, unicyclist and mathematician.
o/|\o peter_bier@usa.net


Get free email and a permanent address at http://www.netaddress.com/?N=1

I have been working on the mount Peter recommends below and while I have
not yet attempted it on the 5’ uni, believe that it will help. I have
found two factors to be key to success with this mount.

The first is speed. Do not hesitate; pull up and get your non-dominant
foot on the up pedal quickly and start idling. The mount falls apart if
you’re not fast.

The second I have discovered is that as you push up off the down pedal you
push the seat down and slightly in the direction of the up pedal. Not too
much or you’ll tilt over in that direction, but just enough down and to
the side to ease getting up on the saddle and placing your foot on the up
pedal. Perhaps someone with more experience can describe it better, but it
just came to me over the past few days and feels to be a natural part of
the mount.

I’m planning to start working seriously on mounting the 5’ uni after the
Long Beach Island Unithon on June 2nd.

Raphael Lasar Matawan, NJ

Peter Bier wrote:

> Another exercise which may help is to practice mounting a normal
> unicycle in the same manner that you finish a giraffe mount. Get your
> normal uni, place one pedal at its lowest position and then place your
> foot on it. Now mount the uni by using an upward motion, placing your
> other foot onto the other pedal and pulling yourself up on to the seat.
> It will be easier to begin with if you lower the seat a little (and
> don’t try this with baggy pants!)
>
> The key here is to practice mounting with upward motion rather than
> having the wheel moving underneath you. This mimics the last bit of a
> giraffe mount and should help you get used to the vertical motion and
> balance required.
>
> o o Peter Bier o O o Juggler, unicyclist and mathematician.
> o/|\o peter_bier@usa.net
>
> ____________________________________________________________________
> Get free email and a permanent address at http://www.netaddress.com/?N=1

The video really helped. After I got over my nervouseness and with the
help of the neighborhood kids counting 1, 2 ,3 I got it with a bit of
practice and a brick to prop the wheel. I’m confident I won’t need the
brick much longer. Thanks for your help.

P.S. Don’t let the neighbor’s kid stick his finger in the sprocket. The 5
year old next door did that to me as I moved and amputated about 1/2"
of his finger. OOP’s.

Jeff Lutkus wrote:

> Here’s what I do:
>
> left foot on wheel. Lift right foot from ground to right pedal. Lift
> left foot from wheel, and begin moving it towards left pedal. Sit down.
> Place left foot on left pedal. Ride off
>
> See video clip:
> http://lutkus.org/juggle/photos/video/jeff_lutkus_freemount1.mpg
>
> Alternate method. I think this one is a little easier, though, I don’t
> practice it, so I’m not very good: right foot on right pedal. Lift left
> foot from ground towards left pedal. Sit down. Left foot on left pedal.
> Ride off.
> http://lutkus.org/juggle/photos/video/jeff_lutkus_freemount2.mpg
>
> Now, what I would be interested to learn is how to mount assisted by
> people or objects. I can mount with the aid of a wall. I have yet to
> figure out how to use antyhing which would raise me off the ground
> (ie: back of a pickup truck) or anything whith isn’t tall and flat
> like a wall.
>
> jeff lutkus
>
> — Jeff <sarajeff@usa.net>
> > wrote: I can mount my 5’ unicycle off the back of my pick-up truck. By
> > accident I figured out how to mount it with the aid of a stop sign.
> > How do I free mount it without the aid of a sign or platform, without
> > braking my leg or arm?
>
> _____________________________________________________________
> Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

> P.S. Don’t let the neighbor’s kid stick his finger in the sprocket. The
> 5 year old next door did that to me as I moved and amputated about
> 1/2" of his finger. OOP’s.

Ow! Yes, this is a constant danger when riding around small children. I
don’t know what it is, but unicycles and small children seem to be like
magnets. The more dangerous a trick you’re trying to do, the closer they
seem to want to be.

The other day I was riding on a 4’ wall with a ramp at the end. All these
little kids on Razor scooters materialized out of nowhere and kept getting
closer and closer. Then there was a 1 year old, who kept walking in front
of me every time I tried to head for the wall. I couldn’t do it.

Never let a child be in your fall range. If kids want to watch you, they
will back up if you ask them. If the only other choice is not watching you
they will cooperate.

Stay on top, John Foss President, Unicycling Society of America President,
International Unicycling Federation jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

On 8/5/01 6:21 pm, John Foss posted:
>
> Never let a child be in your fall range. If kids want to watch you, they
> will back up if you ask them. If the only other choice is not watching
> you they will cooperate.
>
There were a couple of guys I saw a few years back at the Greenbelt
Festival who did a juggling routine both on giraffes (I guess 8 footers).
There were always kids sitting on the grass, and part of the patter to the
assembled crowd (ie - parents) was, "if I fall off, and kill one of them,
don’t worry

  • I promise I’ll help make a new one."

Didn’t ever know their names, but they performed as the dangerous
brothers. (They were mainly jugglers, just did a bit of uni stuff.)


Trevor Coultart (Anecdotal and/or amusing quotation currently unavailable)