Legality of Unicycling

> From: Akuma <bs1dwc@bath.ac.uk> To: unicycling@mcs.kent.edu
>
[blah deleted]
>
> In a similar vein, I actually saw a bobby on the beat the other day. On his
> own too - I thought they only patrolled in pairs. Anyway, I rode past him
> seeing it as a test case to see what the police thought about me riding the
> streets of Bath on one wheel. He smiled and said hello.

Has anyone figured out the law on unicycling here? I’ve been stopped a couple
of times for riding on the pavement, but never in London’s royal parks, where
riding a bike can cause real hassles. (The policemen in the parks seem most
amused by unicyclists - especially when there’s more than one of us.)

Then again, the last time I was stopped for riding on the pavement, I asked the
copper if it was alright to ride on the road (you know, bikes are illegal unless
they’ve got front and rear reflecters and two sets of independent brakes). He
said it was OK, as long as I rode on the left. The road we were on at the time
was the A5 Edgeware Road at Marble Arch - one of central London’s busiest. Well
I’ve got used to it now, but one day I’ll be stopped for weaving through the
traffic… then I shall quote my other encounter…

pab.

Re: Legality of unicycling

HOWDY! About the legality of unicycling: last Febuary, along with
seven other unicyclists, tarveled to Germany. While staying with Sammy
Hellwig, we were informed of the rules. To be considerd a bicycle, and
consequently have to follow the laws, the following must be true:
a).

A stearing system must be presant.
b.) Breaks must be presant. Under these simple guidelines, unicycles
are permitted most anywhere This however wasn’t the case. While
trying to board a bus, we were hasseled (in german, of course.) A
helpful citizen translated for us, but couldn’t convince the bus
driver to let us ride. We took a taxi. I don’t know if there are any
Germans out there who this will benefit, but I thought others might
find this interesting. Later Dude! Karl Frankowski

Re: Legality of Unicycling

The legal destinction between unicycles and bicycles is also upheld in
California, USA. From the California Vehicle Code, Words and Phrases Defined:

  1. Bicycle A bicycle is a device upon which any person may ride, propelled
    exclusively by human power through a belt, chain, or gears, and having one
    or more wheels.

  2. Pedestrian A pedestrian is any person who is afoot or who is using a means
    of conveyance propelled by human power other than a bicycle.

Note that a giraffe is a bicycle.

Unfortunately, in actual practice, the police are more in tune with the spirit
of the law, and classify a pedestrian as anyone on foot, and a bicycle as anyone
who has a wheel and might be a menace to a pedestrian.

However, in my experience, Teenagers in fast food restaurants are more open to
the strict legal interpretations, so we don’t have to confine our trustworthy
mounts to bicycle racks.

eric. ( who will deny being a Californian )

Re: Legality of Unicycling

On Mon, 10 Oct 1994 pbennett@lssec.bt.co.uk wrote:

> Has anyone figured out the law on unicycling here? I’ve been stopped

Yes. The cycling sections in The Highway Code refer to cycles, rather than
specifically to bicycles. It is illegal to cycle on the pavement. It is
illegal to ride on the road unless the cycle is roadworthy and has working
brakes, 2 contradictory conditions on a unicycle.

As for the reflectors, I’ve got them anyway. Pop into Halfords, you can get
red reflective tape to go on the back and white microprism stickers to go on
the front.

----------------Hey, I can see the whole world from here!---------------
| Danny Colyer | bs1dwc@bath.ac.uk | To drop is human, | University of Bath |
| ----------------- | To juggle is divine. |
-----------------http://www.bath.ac.uk/~bs1dwc/home.html----------------

Re: Legality of Unicycling

>The legal destinction between unicycles and bicycles is also upheld in
>California, USA. From the California Vehicle Code, Words and Phrases Defined:
>
>231. Bicycle A bicycle is a device upon which any person may ride, propelled
> exclusively by human power through a belt, chain, or gears, and having one
> or more wheels.
>
>Note that a giraffe is a bicycle.

    Note also that, in California, a giraffe is not a street-legal bicycle,
    as it does not meet the skid-braking test (last time I checked the Code,
    in the early 80s). Thus, your only legal option is to push, not ride, it
    along the street.

    Note also that (as of the time I checked), the Code by implication
    classified skateboards, baby carriages, and roller skates as
    bicycles, and declared them all as non-street legal, due to the
    braking test. Well, maybe one could lay a skid with a baby buggy; I
    haven't tried that. :-

    I did, once, successfully argue with a policeman that, since I was not
    riding a bicycle, and a sidewalk was available, I was obligated to ust
    the sidewalk.

                                    Craig Milo Rogers