Learning to Ride

My friend Chrissie learned to ride off her mom’s old schwinn uni. She started
out holding to a basketball pole and somehow mamaged by pedaling in circles
around it. It took her a whooping year or more to learn because she had to grow!
She was to small for the uni but finally learned. Last Sept. I saw an article in
a magazine about unicycling, I borrowed her unicycle and learned within a week.
I guess for the first few days I didn’t notice any difference except that the
front of the unicycle seat was really getting scraped up. Finally I felt it.
Small at first but it was there. It was balance, a nescessity of unicycling. I
got down to the end of my driveway but that was all I could make because I
couldn’t turn to go on to the side walk yet. Turning was the worst! Now I am
MUCH better at unicyling. I can go backwards, one footed, etc. I am soo glad I
learned and will never regret it!

Stacy~Einrad

If anyone knows the word unicycle in any other language send it to me!!

Re: Learning to Ride

What a great story!

Stacy~Einrad wrote:

>My friend Chrissie learned to ride off her mom’s old schwinn uni. She started
>out holding to a basketball pole and somehow managed by pedaling in circles
>around it. It took her a whooping year or more to learn because she had to
>grow! She was to small for the uni but finally learned. Last Sept.

Wow! Learning to ride around a basketball pole! I’ve never heard of that before.
Has anyone else?

Does or did Chrissie’s mom actually ride a unicycle? Could be another
story here. :slight_smile:

> I saw an article in a magazine about unicycling, I borrowed her unicycle and
> learned within a week. I guess for the first few days I didn’t notice any
> difference except that the front of the unicycle seat was really getting
> scraped up. Finally I felt it. Small at first but it was there. It was
> balance, a necessity of unicycling. I got down to the end of my driveway but
> that was all I could make because I couldn’t turn to go on to the side walk
> yet. Turning was the worst! Now I am MUCH better at unicycling. I can go
> backwards, one footed, etc. I am soo glad I learned and will never regret it!

So how many weeks did it take you to go backwards, one footed, etc.? Can you
tell us of your experiences learning these skills or any other unique uni
experience?

>If anyone knows the word unicycle in any other language send it to me!!

In Japanese there’s ichirinsha and yunisaikuru. Yunisaikuru is really just a
foreign borrowed word from English, pronounced the Japanese way. (Yunisaikuru is
simply the way Japanese pronounce the English word unicycle, adapted to their
phonetic system.) I understand that ichirinsha is used far more often than
yunisaikuru, though. (I’m not even sure that yunisaikuru is in any dictionary,
though I suspect many foreign borrowed words are not often included in many
dictionaries.)

Stay on Top,

Ken Fuchs <kfuchs@winternet.com

Re: Learning to Ride

Not another language, exactly, but a friend from the Phillipines keeps calling
my 'cycle a “monobike.”

In Spanish, it’s probably una unacicleta.

/stern

Re: Learning to ride

scwolfe@ix.netcom.com (Steven Wolfe) wrote:

> Also, here’s my tip to those who, like me, are only learning to ride a
> unicycle: buy an expensive unicycle. The more money you spend on it, the
> less likely you are to give up.

I would agree, though you shouldn’t base your decision on price alone. The
important things are that it has a seat you can live with, and it will hold up
to use. A good unicycle will hold up to abuse, and a cheap unicycle may need
help just to hold up to regular use.

Saddle choice is a very personal thing, but I can offer at least this safe
advice: If the front is a wide as the back and it has metal bumpers, stay
away!
Those seats are terrible, and are too wide up front so your legs
constantly chafe on them.

> Seriously, I’m just learning how to ride (all by myself), and I’m at the
> point where I can go a few revolutions, then fall off due to lack of
> balance. I’m practicing practically day and night, and I am seeing gradual
> improvement, but I can’t shake the feeling that I’m missing something
> important. I’ve found that if I lean forward, I stay on longer, but I can’t
> really go more than a few revolutions without falling off. I guess what I’m
> trying to say is, any pointers?

You are probably making the mistake most adult learners make; you are trying to
think. I believe that kids learn faster than adults because, rather than trying
to analyze the process, they just get on, go, get back on, and go some more.

There are two problems with analyzing. First, the process by which a unicycle
can be ridden and controlled is hard to understand (it’s a lot easier after
you can do it, but very hard to put into concrete terms!). Because of this,
doubt is built upon doubt in the rider’s mind because he or she is not
convinced of how all of this works. That brings us to the second problem: you
don’t believe you can.

You must believe you can. Let nothing stand in your way, tell yourself that if
thousands of snotty nosed kids can do it, of course you can too. It’s true
anyway, of course. I had to do this to myself while learning to ride (on a solid
tire Sears special), and much later while learning to rock (on a real unicycle).
I would have given up had I not seen a “mere mortal” neighborhood kid do it many
years before.

Get out there and ride. The only thing you may want to think about is which
way you are falling off. Are you consistently falling off to the front? The
rear? The side? If you usually fall in the same manner, try overcompensating
so that you fall the other way. The place you are looking for is somewhere in
between. Knowing this, try to keep your falls “equally balanced”, if you know
what I mean.

Good luck! Stay on Top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone unifoss@calweb.com

Re: Learning to ride

John Foss <unifoss@calweb.com> wrote:

>You are probably making the mistake most adult learners make; you are trying to
>think. I believe that kids learn faster than adults because, rather than trying
>to analyze the process, they just get on, go, get back on, and go some more.
>
I am looking to buy a unicycle, so I can’t speak as an expert on this topic.
But I can bring to mind my experience when learning to ski, when over 40
years old…

I have been skating all my life, and speed skating (ice) for the last ten (until
I moved to Singapore … no racing here). I only took to the slopes a few years
ago, in Japan and Korea.

The things I observed about adults learning to ski were:

  •   Afraid of looking silly
    
  •   Afraid of hurting themselves
    
  •   Afraid of falling over
    
  •   Not being sure they could do it
    

I was lucky. After years of skating, I don’t care about looking silly; I’m
fairly sure I won’t hurt myself (much); I know I will fall over (!); and
if kids can do it, I can. So I did, and on the first day I was at the top slope,
careering downwards kamikaze style. And having fun. And falling over a lot. Any
bruises were swiftly repaired by sake in the evening.

These are the attitudes I intend to have as I learn to unicycle, just as soon as
I can find one…

Good luck, Cheers, Craig