Learning to ride on a Coker (Day 5-26 Feb)

Went to the club early. Had the hall all to myself for a while before Dave arrived. Unicycling is much easier on a nice flat hall floor! Practiced a bit on and off through the evening. I estimate that I must be up to 2 hours total by now. Things are getting easier. I am getting less exhausted. By the time I left I was pretty much making it across the hall floor with a single supporting arm. I just hope that Dave doesn’t bruise easily.

I feel that there might be a chance for me to do the front paving solo this weekend after all! :smiley: :smiley: :smiley:

I also had a go on Dave’s 20 inch wheel. What a difference! It is like going from riding a brick to riding a feather. It is so light and responsive and surprisingly easy to ride. It does, however, require a different mounting technique than the coker. I’m used to grabbing the wheel and jumping up. That’s not so easy on a 20 incher. I did a few traverses of the hall (also with a friendly supporting arm, thanks again Dave). This is NOT bad, considering that the last time I got on it I fell off sideways in a spectacular unplanned dismount.

Just about everybody who can ride a unicycle had a go on the coker. Dave diligently tried to idle on it, and managed it when nobody was watching. I must admit that even I have noticed things that you can do on the coker that you can’t do on a smaller wheel. For example, I can brake the wheel by resting my knee on it. You try doing THAT on a smaller wheel.

In return for all the support I helped out a newcomer, Mark, who made pretty good progress too. He should be back next week so we might have another convert too. He is also interested in poi. I don’t know if that is a good or a bad thing.

When I got home I tried to show Leslie my new skills. It is not so easy to ride in the dark, even if you have some lights on. I’ll try again tomorrow.

Well, I had a good day. Now to try to unwind enough to go to sleep. Work tomorrow then more practice time!

Jayne

Re: Learning to ride on a Coker (Day 5-26 Feb)

On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 15:00:27 -0600, Jayne ZA wrote:

>I also had a go on Dave’s 20 inch wheel. What a difference! It is like
>going from riding a brick to riding a feather. It is so light and
>responsive and surprisingly easy to ride.

That’s an interesting remark. The single most ‘special’ issue in your
learning progress is that you ride a Coker. Learning on a Coker is
supposed to me more difficult, but from your progress and remarks so
far I was beginning to doubt it. But your observation has reinforced
my belief system.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

“Heck, even my toes were aching from trying to grip the soles of my shoes! - Tommy Thompson”

Re: Re: Learning to ride on a Coker (Day 5-26 Feb)

I assume you’re referring to the “surprisingly easy to ride” comment. I probably could have phrased that better, but it was late and I was tired. What was most surprising to me was just how easily I transitioned from the coker to the 20 inch wheel, despite the differences in size and weight. All my practice up to last night had been on the coker, but I moved virtually seamlessly to the smaller wheel with little or no loss of the ability I had built up on the coker. This was contrary to expectations of the more experienced riders I had spoken to.

Dave, for instance, mentioned that riding the coker after riding a 20 inch wasn’t as difficult as riding a 20 inch after riding a coker.

Any idea of why this should be so?

Jayne

Re: Re: Re: Learning to ride on a Coker (Day 5-26 Feb)

i think the one main thing that jayne’s got from learning to ride on the Coker is not to use too much force on the pedals

in my experience, it takes new riders a while before they realise that too much force (plus weigh on the pedal) will simply lead to a 12-6 stall and a quick UPD

applying force to the pedal of a stationary Coker is normally one of the last things u have to do to join some obscure frat-style club in an alaskan pub

having started her learnng career with this ‘bad’ habit never being an issue, will rush her to riding in no time

Re: Learning to ride on a Coker (Day 5-26 Feb)

On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 03:19:38 -0600, Jayne ZA wrote:

>I assume you’re referring to the “surprisingly easy to ride” comment.
Indeed I am (was).

Now even with this qualification…
>What was most surprising to me was just how easily I
>transitioned from the coker to the 20 inch wheel
…I still think that a 20" is intrinsically easier to ride. I’ve yet
to come across a learner on a 20" who is as far as you now, then tries
a Coker for a while, and is surprised at the ease of the transition.

So I now rest assured that your progress does not put my belief system
(that smaller wheels are easier to learn on) upside down, but is
rather ‘just’ due to your being talented. :slight_smile:

>Dave, for instance, mentioned that riding the coker after riding a 20
>inch wasn’t as difficult as riding a 20 inch after riding a coker.
>
>Any idea of why this should be so?
He might be more accustomed to larger wheels, but I don’t think he is?

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

“Heck, even my toes were aching from trying to grip the soles of my shoes! - Tommy Thompson”

I’ll take that as a compliment, thank you!

Considering the delight on his face when he was riding the coker, and how reluctant he was for me to go home, I very much doubt it.

Jayne