keep u fit?

i reckon unicycling is hell over good exercise better than a bike!
anyone agree? has anyone lost weight or got fitter from unicycling?

It is great exercise. It works the whole body (as long as you flail your arms while riding :slight_smile: ).

I find hockey especially good exercise as I can ride until I drop. Playing completely takes my mind off being exhausted. If I ever go jogging I get bored long before I get too tired.

cool

agree nickjb! for some reason i find it easier 2 go up big hills wihtout stopping on my uni than running up the hill instead
unicycling is better exercise than cycling coz no brakes and no gears so u have 2 work harder plus it exerices yur stomach muscles, its just amazing really! :wink:

As a newbie, I had no idea about the total boby workout that you get from uni. I still ride other wheels, road bike, FS mountain and single speed mountain and have noticed the benefit from a couple muni sessions per week. Seems to be a little more snap in the legs. The ab strengthening thing has also been very nice for kayaking as ab strength is vital for precise control in that sport. I’m lovin’ learnin’

I have only been unicycling for two months and i think i have lost four pounds. Now that’s not IMPRESSIVE but i think that it’s better than nothing.

As for being fit… i was never fit to begin with.

Re: keep u fit?

treepotato wrote:
> i reckon unicycling is hell over good exercise better than a bike!

> anyone agree? has anyone lost weight or got fitter from unicycling?

Yes yes yes.


Knowledge is power.
Power corrupts.
Study hard. Be evil.

I’ve been unicycling since the end of March.

So far, I’ve lost 5 pounds and 3 or 4 inches off my waistline.

I’m not sure if unicycling is so much a better work out as one that keeps me interested. I never have to psych myself up to go out and ride. Also, I have never had another exercise program where I really get annoyed on those days that I can’t go out and do it.

Yeah… i think so. If unicycling is a workout, it’s a cleverly disguised one.

I may be the first to disagree here. Everyone’s
experience is different.

Out of recent curiousity, I took my heartrate
monitor along for some rides on the Coker and a
24" uni. Based on my recorded heartrate, I stayed
around 120 bpm during most of the riding, maybe
peaking around 140 up some of the hills.

While road bike riding for similar time periods
my average heartrate will be in the mid-150’s,
usually spiking close to 180 on the hills or
during a hard sustained effort. Even when bicycling
at a sedate pace, my heart rate will be around
140.

I can imagine, however, some bicyclists riding
at a pace that would be at a similar level of
exertion as a unicycle ride. It may be that my
uni skills simply aren’t good enough to push
myself to the level I can on my bike.

However, this compares uni vs. bike on a paved
road. The couple of times I’ve tried MUni, I’ve
noticed that I quickly go briefly aneorobic and
my perceived exertion is way off the scale.

None of this should be construed to determine
which activity is “better”, since the best activity
is the one you have the most fun doing. Tommy
Thompson is an ex-racer and may have more useful
information to add.

Jeff “enjoys cycling on 1 or 2 wheels” Bauer

This summer I’ve been muni’ing with the specific goal of increasing the size of my quads. I’ve been riding hard and increasing the duration of my rides. It’s definitely a fantastic workout. After every ride I’m sweating profusely and my legs are always very tired - but it’s woth it! :smiley:

If you’re going for maximum workout potential a bike gets the advantage over a unicycle. The gears on a bike let you tailor the workout much more than you can on a unicycle.

On a bike you can maintain a target heartrate much more precisely than you can on a unicycle. On the bike you select the gear, cadence and speed necessary for you to maintain your target heartrate. On a unicycle you are much more at the mercy of the terrain to set your level of effort. If you wanted to maintain a heartrate of say 160 bpm for 30 minutes it would me much easier to do that on a bike than on a unicycle.

You can also vary the workout more on a bike. You can choose to push big gears to help develop strength and power, you can choose to use lower gears to develop spinning, or you can do short sprints. On a unicycle you’re stuck in your one gear and you’re at the mercy of the terrain to define the level of effort.

If you’re looking to develop endurance you’ll get better results riding a bike than a unicycle.

I’m loosing weight because I stopped eating pizza and I’m drinking less Coke. I’m also doing more unicycling (mostly muni) but I’m pretty sure it’s the better diet that is making the difference.

Well John, from one Guinness lover to another I have to say it’s not the Pizza or Coke that’s putting on the pounds, but it’s very clever of you to divert your attention to them. It’s also nice to see that your priorities are in the right order. Mmmm… rich creamy Guinness. :stuck_out_tongue:

-Jason
<edit>

Good work Jason, keep it up and promise us some photos at the end of summer, eh?! :wink:

Erin

Re: keep u fit?

john_Childs wrote:
> If you’re going for maximum workout potential a bike gets the
> advantage over a unicycle. The gears on a bike let you tailor the
> workout much more than you can on a unicycle.

That’s not necessarily an advantage, see below.

> On a bike you can maintain a target heartrate much more precisely than
> you can on a unicycle. On the bike you select the gear, cadence and
> speed necessary for you to maintain your target heartrate. On a
> unicycle you are much more at the mercy of the terrain to set your
> level of effort. If you wanted to maintain a heartrate of say 160
> bpm for 30 minutes it would me much easier to do that on a bike than
> on a unicycle.

Interval training works better than steady-state for fitness and fat loss.

> You can also vary the workout more on a bike. You can choose to push
> big gears to help develop strength and power, you can choose to use
> lower gears to develop spinning, or you can do short sprints. On a
> unicycle you’re stuck in your one gear and you’re at the mercy of the
> terrain to define the level of effort.

No, you can vary cadence. And of course terrain as well - you can pick your
course, hey?

> If you’re looking to develop endurance you’ll get better results
> riding a bike than a unicycle.

Not at all. You can coast, literally, on a bicycle. Downhills are a
completely different experience on a unicycle. Brakes and gears and
handlebars make workouts faster and easier, not harder.

> I’m losing weight because I stopped eating pizza and I’m drinking
> less Coke. I’m also doing more unicycling (mostly muni) but I’m
> pretty sure it’s the better diet that is making the difference.


Knowledge is power.
Power corrupts.
Study hard. Be evil.

I never biked enough to know how much of a workout that is. But unicycling and especially municycling is great exercise.

I always found street riding (unicycling) hard to get me into my target heart range for a long enough period to be considered an aerobic exercise. I had to pedal pretty dang fast, and I’d exhaust my leg and stomach muscles after 5 minutes or so (trying to keep from falling off while going so fast).
Muni, on the other hand, has the effect of getting me into the upper end of my target heart rate, if not higher, when going uphill, and pretty high when hitting a tough section of downhill (more from fear, however).

Re: keep u fit?

In article <treepotato.qk4dn@timelimit.unicyclist.com>,
treepotato.qk4dn@timelimit.unicyclist.com (treepotato) wrote:

> unicycling is better exercise than cycling
I’d say it depends on the situation. Cycling up a really steep hill in a
really high or a really low gear can really kill you. As long as they
both get you out of breath, they’re both good exercise. If you’re talking
about muscles, I know that uniing exercises some different muscles from
cycling, because I had been cycling to school every day for 5 years before
I started uniing and for the first few weeks of uniing, my knees ached.

Liam

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Yep, if I ride fast on the flat for a few minutes, I can only get my heart rate up to 150bpm, however, when I hit the offroad, even flat but bumpy sections, riding as fast as possible I can easily get it up to 180bpm. On downhills I sometimes hit really high heart rates (190+) probably due to fear.

On the coker I can get slightly higher heart rates, but it still only gets very high riding offroad.

Incidentally, heart rate monitors are good for long distance riding, I can ride for 5 or more hours without any long stops if I keep between 120 and 150 bpm when on flat or easier downhill sections.

Joe

If you don’t have a specific target like endurance or weightloss then gladiators is the great. It’s fun and you exercise your whole body.

I have to agree with John Childs and others that bicycles make it easier to control your workout, and therefore to get higher quality exercise. It’s pretty obvious; you can choose your gear, and then choose how hard to push in each gear. You simply have less options on a unicycle.

That said, I’ve been riding both a bike and a Coker to work. I know for darn sure I’m burning a significantly higher number of calories on the unicycle.

This question of exercise can be approached from many different directions. Most of the respondants have been thinking of their own point of view, which is not necessarily on topic with the original question. Being motivated to ride a unicycle more than a bike doesn’t make it better exercise. It makes it better for you, because you’re doing it. Certainly this is important. We have to do whatever activity for it to count as exercise.

In my situation, I have about 8.1 miles to cover to and from work. On the bike it takes me about 30 minutes, and on the unicycle it’s taking me about 40 (waiting for some shorter cranks to try). I’m pedaling fast for all of those 40 minutes, except when I’m waiting for lights to change. On the bike, I might be coasting or messing around with different gears.

I work hard on both cycles, and haven’t compared heart rates. But to the guy who mentioned those comparisons earlier, he was doing time vs. heart rate, but not counting distance covered. This is fine for measuring excercise done, but doesn’t get me to and from work. So I have to ride longer to get to work and back on the unicycle, and pedal every inch. Though my heart rate might not be as high on the bike, my “sweat quotient” makes it clear enough where the most effort is being expended. :slight_smile: