jumping higher

I’m comfortable hopping up curbs and parking blocks and hopping down
flights of stairs, but am looking for technical advice on negotiating
larger obstacles (logs, benches, etc.). I can hop consistently while
holding the seat between my legs, but my seat-in-front jumps are less
controlled. Do seat-in-front jumps give the most height? If so, how should
I practice them? Also, how useful are crank and pedal catches? How can
these techniques be applied? Thanks for the help. Brendan Kelley

Seat-out-in-front hops give more height because you can raise the uni
higher. The learning progression is to become comfortable riding seat in
front, then try hopping up stuff. Learning to seat drag or ultimate wheel
is also really helpful for developing side-to-side muscle control.

-Kris — Brendan Kelley <bkelley@mail.colgate.edu> wrote:
> I’m comfortable hopping up curbs and parking blocks and hopping down
> flights of stairs, but am looking for technical advice on negotiating
> larger obstacles (logs, benches, etc.). I can hop consistently while
> holding the seat between my legs, but my seat-in-front jumps are less
> controlled. Do seat-in-front jumps give the most height? If so, how
> should I practice them? Also, how useful are crank and pedal catches?
> How can these techniques be applied? Thanks for the help. Brendan Kelley


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I found useful in my case to always try 2 approaches with bigger
obstacles, static hops and ride & jump. It seems I’m able to detend my
strong leg much farther and with more power when I ride & switch to jump.
The more flex & relax I can be, the best I can jump. I’m lamer with
static hops (which I use most to correct my position on small surfaces)
but still working on it. However the ride/jump technique is not always
possible in constrained areas.

my 2 cents, Oli-

-----Original Message----- From: Brendan Kelley
[mailto:bkelley@mail.colgate.edu] Sent: Monday, June 18, 2001 1:28 PM To:
‘unicycling@winternet.com’ Subject: jumping higher

I’m comfortable hopping up curbs and parking blocks and hopping down
flights of stairs, but am looking for technical advice on negotiating
larger obstacles (logs, benches, etc.). I can hop consistently while
holding the seat between my legs, but my seat-in-front jumps are less
controlled. Do seat-in-front jumps give the most height? If so, how should
I practice them? Also, how useful are crank and pedal catches? How can
these techniques be applied? Thanks for the help. Brendan Kelley

Thanks for the input on passing obstacles. My next question is how to
attempt a ride-and-jump. Since the uni has direct drive, how can I move
into jumping position (pedals horizontal) without stopping the wheel and
losing momentum?

I’d say prepare yourself mentally and when your stronger feet is going
down, detend your legs & grab your seat.

It was difficult for me to get it right at first ie. synchronisation
between my strong feet & my leg detending. I was loosing all my
momentum after the (rather small) jump forward. Continuous riding came
after a while.

-----Original Message----- From: Brendan Kelley
[mailto:bkelley@mail.colgate.edu] Sent: Monday, June 18, 2001 6:51 PM To:
'unicycling@winternet.com ’ Subject: RE: jumping higher

Thanks for the input on passing obstacles. My next question is how to
attempt a ride-and-jump. Since the uni has direct drive, how can I move
into jumping position (pedals horizontal) without stopping the wheel and
losing momentum?

Brendan Kelley wrote:
>
> Thanks for the input on passing obstacles. My next question is how to
> attempt a ride-and-jump. Since the uni has direct drive, how can I move
> into jumping position (pedals horizontal) without stopping the wheel and
> losing momentum?

I would say stop the wheel, not your body.

Actually, as much as I try to launch from both legs while doing the
ride-and-jump, it still turns out that I ride fast, lean back and nearly
lock whatever leg is on the upswing. This launches me upward and brings
the wheel to a stop so you pedals are horizontal for your landing. So in
effect, you are trading some forward momentum for upward.

My $.02

Chris

For forward static hops I’ve recently started having the rear pedal
slightly lower than horizontal. The upshot of this is the forward pedal
has a small amount of forward movement before it’s horizontal for take
off. By giving the forward pedal a very brief push to bring it horizontal
then hoping I get better height and / or distance. At a guess it’s because
I’m giving myself some forward momentum that gets lost when you become
stationary and start bouncing on the spot.

Trials riders (the 2 wheel variety) do a similar thing to jump gaps from a
stationary position but have the brakes firmly locked before releasing
them and simultaneously giving the leading pedal a push. Usually they’ll
be hoping on their back wheel at the time (unicycle envy!) and lower the
front wheel to go further or keep it high for more height. This could be
translated in unicycle terms to the amount of forward lean at the moment
you hop on a unicycle - upright for more height or tipping forward for
more distance.

All the above relates only to my 20" Monty. It doesn’t seem to make the
same difference on my new 24x3 uni but then I’m still getting used to the
extra size and weight.

Yet another 2 cents, Neil

-----Original Message----- From: opaugam@aptilon.com
[mailto:opaugam@aptilon.com] Sent: 19 June 2001 14:41 To:
bkelley@mail.colgate.edu; unicycling@winternet.com Subject: RE: jumping
higher Importance: Low

I’d say prepare yourself mentally and when your stronger feet is going
down, detend your legs & grab your seat.

It was difficult for me to get it right at first ie. synchronisation
between my strong feet & my leg detending. I was loosing all my
momentum after the (rather small) jump forward. Continuous riding came
after a while.

-----Original Message----- From: Brendan Kelley
[mailto:bkelley@mail.colgate.edu] Sent: Monday, June 18, 2001 6:51 PM To:
'unicycling@winternet.com ’ Subject: RE: jumping higher

Thanks for the input on passing obstacles. My next question is how to
attempt a ride-and-jump. Since the uni has direct drive, how can I move
into jumping position (pedals horizontal) without stopping the wheel and
losing momentum?