IUF basketball rules

Attention unicycle basketball afficionados: We are getting down to details on
our IUF Basketball rules. Alberto has commented on the set of rules I posted the
other day, with the questions and concerns below. We need to resolve these
areas, and I would like to hear from everyone who has an opinion on them:

>From Alberto:
<<We used the International Basketball Rules with the following clarifications:

  1. By suggestion of Quebec, the three second area became a four second area.>>

If this is what was used at UNICON, we should consider it official. Any
objections?

<<2) In Quebec the person putting the ball in play (like after a time out, a
field goal, etc.) can be dismounted. In Puerto Rico he must be in the unicycle.
Either way is OK with me.>>

I think rules should state that it does not matter, as long as that person is
out of bounds.

<<3) In regular basketball, a player may do 2 steps without dribbling, first
with one feet, then with the other. If he goes left right, then left right
again, that is not two steps, that is four steps and therefore traveling,
Applying that to unicycles, you cannot go two full revolutions because you would
have gone four steps. You can only do one left right, which is two steps, which
is one (1) full revolution.>>

<<4) If you idle with the ball you are moving your pivot foot and therefore
traveling.>>

How do you do the unicylcing equivalent of pivoting? How would entry level
riders do it? (The game should be easy or accessible to entry level riders)

<<We must specify that a player must be mounted at all times. What happens when
a dismounted player and/or his unicycle touches the ball? Normally, the other
team just gets the ball out of bounds. But what happens if the dismounted
player, or his unicycle, touches the ball to disrupt an easy lay-up?>>

How about something like this: “If a player off his or her unicycle makes a
deliberate ball contact, the other team gets a free shot.” If it’s disrupting a
shot on goal, perhaps they should get two free shots? Let the basketball experts
answer this.

<<Is a player who jumps, or falls, off his unicycle mounted before he touches
the floor? It could be to his advantage to jump for a jump ball, a dunk, a
lay-up, blocking a shot. Two comments, before everybody makes their minds up.
2) Dunks are basketball most exciting plays.
3) A unicycle in the floor can be very dangerous, especially in a busy
paint area.
4) Pushing people from the back when they are not expecting it is sick,
cowardly, and extremely dangerous in a unicycle. One thing is to play hard,
another to play dirty. There is lots of pushing and grabbing in the paint
area, especially for rebounds. Riders are expecting it, and therefore
prepared. But there was some senseless pushing from behind at UNICON VII, at
the earlier games. Remember, some of the players in opposite teams might be
competing in artistic the next day. We need a strong flagrant foul rule.>>

I think players should be able to manipulate the ball until their bodies touch
the floor. This would enable some interesting saves, passes and even shots, as
the rider is on his way to the floor. To keep riders from taking advantage of
this rule by falling against other players, they can only manipulate the ball
until they touch the floor, or another player (or another player’s unicycle).
This would allow the kind of blocking (and shots) that make our games so
interesting.

A unicycle on the floor is a hazard that must be considered. How has this been
handled in the past? Leaving a dead unicycle in the path of an oncoming rider
could be done on purpose as a blocking maneuver. This is not especially
dangerous, but I don’t think is a desirable part of our game. The danger comes
usually under the basket when many riders are looking up and not down. unicycles
are always falling in this area anyway, and I don’t think we can prevent that. A
certain amount of danger is acceptable to me (sure, I’m usually taking pictures
of the game), but the specifics should be discussed by the experienced players
and coaches.

Pushing people from the back should be highly discouraged. I don’t know the
other rules of contact for the game, but we have a “no pushing a rider faster
than he can go” rule even in my versions of Demolition Derby and Sumo. It is
possible that players could be ejectec from the game as well?

<<At UNICON VII, where the game had really being built up, and there was some
anxiety, all it took was a 5 minutes meeting to clarify those rules. The
players, in this case Quebec, and not the refs decided an excellent game. One of
the refs, a lady, did an incredibly good job without any previous experience (if
that was Karen Messamer, she does have quite a bit of experience as a Physical
Education teacher – Foss). A ref with international basketball experience can
do the job by only explaining to him these clarifications. >>

This all sounds fine. I do not have a copy of International Basketball Rules,
and we probably don’t need to include them in our book. I think, if good
international rules already exist, that we just need the rules that are
different for unicycles.

Please comment on the above post, and add any ideas of your own!

John Foss, Chairman IUF Skill Levels and Rules Committee unicycle@aol.com

RE: IUF basketball rules

John Foss wrote that Alberto wrote:

><<3) In regular basketball, a player may do 2 steps without dribbling,
first
>with one feet, then with the other. If he goes left right, then left right
>again, that is not two steps, that is four steps and therefore traveling,
>Applying that to unicycles, you cannot go two full revolutions because you
>would have gone four steps. You can only do one left right, which is two steps,
>which is one (1) full revolution.>>
>
><<4) If you idle with the ball you are moving your pivot foot and
therefore
>traveling.>>
>
>How do you do the unicylcing equivalent of pivoting? How would entry level
>riders do it? (The game should be easy or accessible to entry level riders)

This should be quite easy to clarify: If each time the cranks cross the
horizontal is regarded as a “step”, the above definition of travel fits, and
idling becomes the equivalent of pivoting. This wouldn’t work if people wanted
to do “big” idles (like beginners tend to do), or idled with the cranks
generally horizontal rather than the usual vertical.

Stephen Gun guns@advance.com.au