Is there a Doctor in the house?

Okay Erin, please listen up. Forget what I said about thick socks to
protect you against pin pedals, wear your leg armor!

On Saturday I was practicing my hop, hop, hopping when I decided to try
jumping. I don’t know why, I just thought hey, I can do that. When I
tried putting the seat out in front of me (while hopping) I had a bit of
an accident. My foot came off the pedal and I took it in the shin at
full force. I have several pin wholes, but one of the pins gouged me all
the way to the bone. It started bleeding profusely, but didn’t hurt as
much as you might think. However, when I woke up the next morning it was
still bleeding, and all day, and that night. Today I think it’s finally
settled, but I think it should have been sutured. 24 hours of blood
letting seems a bit excessive to me.

Should I have gone to see a doctor or this excessive bleeding just a
sign of getting older (mid 30’s)? Also, has anyone tried the liquid band
aids that are now available? Would that possibly help clot this sort of
wound?

Cheers,
Jason

[** I’m starting to feel old, and I’m too young for that! **]

You tried putting pressure on it?

Probably should have had it cleaned out, maybe stitched depending on the size of the wound.

And tetanus up to date.

I ended up with 12 stitches earlier this yr due to the pedal ripping my shin open. :frowning:

no doctor

i thought theres somthing in ur blood that suposed to… like patch itself and stop the flow of blood? damn i wish i knew more… but maybe ur blood just dont… Oh Clott, ur blood didnt clott and stop the flow of the blood out of the wound, ??? i dont know, whenever i get hit , it stops bleeding after awhile. but also leg protection is very nice thing to have :stuck_out_tongue:

yeah its something crazy like hemoglobin that helps blood clot up

Re: Here.

In case of most unicycle bleeding truma,

  1. Identify the wound
  2. Controll bleeding
    Usually naturally controlled. Otherwise, can be usually controlled by applying direct pressure with clean towel or aseptic paste in case of profound bleeding.
  3. Linse with Normal saline and/or antiseptics apply.
  4. Dressing

You have to apply some pressure by elastic bandaging. Clot mechanism failure is very unlikely if this is the first time you notice
a prolonged hemorrhage.

from
Dokyoung Yoon MD.

Some of the guys that I used to work with (glass wholesaler) use crazy glue to glue the flaps of skin together. I never tried it myself but it worked for them. I think you have 5 hours before a doctor won’t stitch a wound closed. That was my experience at least.
I’ve used the spray on band aid and it worked quite well for a small cut (3 stitch size).

Drewnicycle,

the Super or Krazy glue like stuff (if you look in to it) was invented by the Military for use in Vietnam to close big wounds fast.

its also is great on those pesky paper cuts.

OT: superglue

There are a million and one uses for Superglue! Here’s one you may not have thought of (or have a use for)…

If it weren’t for that derned guvmint, we could have chicken McNuggets sans salmonella…

Re: Is there a Doctor in the house?

In article <Drewnicycle.as70a@timelimit.unicyclist.com>,
Drewnicycle <Drewnicycle.as70a@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:
)
)Some of the guys that I used to work with (glass wholesaler) use crazy
)glue to glue the flaps of skin together. I never tried it myself but it
)worked for them. I think you have 5 hours before a doctor won’t stitch
)a wound closed. That was my experience at least.
)I’ve used the spray on band aid and it worked quite well for a small cut
)(3 stitch size).

The spray-on band aid is essentially crazy glue. I think they stick some
antiseptic in there.
-Tom

I was just in the military. Judging by my former bosses, Krazy glue was invented for sniffing (and you’ll notice that’s not how you spell crazy…see what I mean?)