Interesting Book Cover for Cookbook

I was browsing through a bookstore when this book’s cover caught my eye.

I think he has the right uni seat, but he needs to raise the seat for
maximum comfort. As well, his cranks are REALLY long, and seemingly not
symmetrical, because his right leg is all the way down at the 6:00
position, but his left leg seems to be in the 10:00 position. I think the
upstroke to 12:00 position would be most uncomfortable.

Anyway, I have no experience riding fast enough to stay afloat on milk,
much less any other liquid medium, so if he wants to set his uni up that
way SO BE IT. Maybe the wine has something to do with it. As for
maneuverability, I’m not sure what direction he would go…

One thing’s for sure. He’d never ever wear out his tire.

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0345421507.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Don Tai in Toronto, Canada http://torontounicyclists.tripod.com

Now that’s a good one!

;)


-Aåron

p.s. the pedals are kinda awkward on those egg-beater unicycles :wink:

I saw the same cookbook on The food channel this past weekend on Emeril Live. very interesting.
Barb

Now, technically, is that a giraffe? Is it geared…

xADF

> Is it geared…
sry, meant “It IS geared…”

Is a geared unicycle by definition a giraffe? I hope not. I am giving some
thought to a geared but otherwise normal unicycle.

Klaas Bil

On Sun, 2 Sep 2001 22:46:10 +0100, “Andrew Feldhaus”
<reply@thread.pls> wrote:

>Now, technically, is that a giraffe? Is it geared…
>
>
>xADF
>
>


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been
picked automagically from a database:” “Zyklon B, biological warfare, 7
August, 1998”

Any unicycle with gears is considered a giraffe. Infact, the SMALLEST unicycle ever made is considered to be a giraffe, because it has a gear system.
-David Kaplan

> > those beat-thingies! (then you would have the problem of a
> helicopter, where
> > pedaling the one would make you spin in the opposite
> direction… :slight_smile:
>
> Not in this case because egg beaters have two blades trhat spin in
> opposite directions

But that’s only true on a “bicycle” egg beater. I was thinking about a
true unicycle one. I don’t think it would be that good even from a cooking
point of view though, as it would tend to take everything in the bowl and
just rotate it…

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com www.unicycling.com

“The difference between a winner and a loser is character.”

> Any unicycle with gears is considered a giraffe.

Not every. Some geared unicycles have been made where the pedaling and
wheel are on the same axle. Tom Miller made a geared-up 20" unicycle in
the early 80’s (sorry no picture). It even used a chain! You pedaled the
inner axle, which had a chain coming off it on one side. This chain turned
a shaft just above the top of the wheel. Another chain came back down from
the shaft on the other side of the wheel, turning the hub and making the
wheel go the equivalent speed of a 40" wheel. This one blurs the line of
definition, because it looks like what we call a “standard” unicycle,
though it’s geared and even has a chain. I would not call it a giraffe.

Somebody in Japan made some ground-level backwards unicycles. Instead of
stacking two wheels on top of each other and pedaling the top one, the
pedals simply turned a pair of gears on each side that made the wheel go
backward. I can’t remember if the wheel was above or below the pedal axle
(sorry no picture). If higher, it could be called a giraffe but the gears
were very small. I think the difference between pedal and wheel axles was
about 1.5".

> Infact, the SMALLEST unicycle ever made is considered to be a giraffe,
> because it has a gear system.

Which smallest unicycle is this? These records sometimes change hands
fast. But yes, most of the tiny unicycles I’ve seen are giraffes, just to
get the pedals a little higher off the ground so normal feet can fit on
them. You have a wheel, a chain going up to a crankset that may only be a
few centimeters higher, and pedals up there. Definitely a giraffe.

The smallest unicycle listed in the Guinness Book (USA) in 1985-6 had a
13/16" wheel. The tire was actually a drive belt, which went up from the
tiny wheel to a larger “sprocket” that had crank arms and pedals
attached. The drive axle was probably about 4" off the ground but this
was also a giraffe. Sorry, I don’t have Web pictures of this one
either. I have photos of all three, and I need to update my Garage Page
to be more comprehensive.

So I guess my definition of a giraffe unicycle would be not that it has to
have gears (most giraffes with chains are 1:1 and not “geared”), but that
the pedaling axle is somewhere above the wheel axle.

And the egg beater still isn’t a unicycle… :slight_smile:

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com www.unicycling.com

“The difference between a winner and a loser is character.”

> Is a geared unicycle by definition a giraffe? I hope not. I am giving
> some thought to a geared but otherwise normal unicycle.

To me a giraffe is where the pedal axle is anywhere above the wheel axle.
So what you have on the cookbook is a giraffe egg-beater. It looks real
cool, but it certainly is not a unicycle. To be one, it should only have
one of those beat-thingies! (then you would have the problem of a
helicopter, where pedaling the one would make you spin in the opposite
direction… :slight_smile:

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“The difference between a winner and a loser is character.”

> those beat-thingies! (then you would have the problem of a helicopter,
> where pedaling the one would make you spin in the opposite
> direction… :slight_smile:

Not in this case because egg beaters have two blades trhat spin in
opposite directions

Yeah but John stated: to be a unicycle it should have one blade.
(Although I wonder if a one-thingied egg beater would be recognised as a
unicycle :slight_smile:

Klaas Bil On Tue, 04 Sep 2001 21:26:52 -0700, jsargean@usc.edu (Jeff
Sargeant) wrote:

>
>> those beat-thingies! (then you would have the problem of a helicopter,
>> where pedaling the one would make you spin in the opposite
>> direction… :slight_smile:
>
>Not in this case because egg beaters have two blades trhat spin in
>opposite directions


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “Dani Halutz, cryptography, EP-3 Aries”

Yeah but John stated: to be a unicycle it should have one blade.
(Although I wonder if a one-thingied egg beater would be recognised as a
unicycle :slight_smile:

Klaas Bil On Tue, 04 Sep 2001 21:26:52 -0700, jsargean@usc.edu (Jeff
Sargeant) wrote:

>
>> those beat-thingies! (then you would have the problem of a helicopter,
>> where pedaling the one would make you spin in the opposite
>> direction… :slight_smile:
>
>Not in this case because egg beaters have two blades trhat spin in
>opposite directions


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “Dani Halutz, cryptography, EP-3 Aries”

Yeah but John stated: to be a unicycle it should have one blade.
(Although I wonder if a one-thingied egg beater would be recognised as a
unicycle :slight_smile:

Klaas Bil On Tue, 04 Sep 2001 21:26:52 -0700, jsargean@usc.edu (Jeff
Sargeant) wrote:

>
>> those beat-thingies! (then you would have the problem of a helicopter,
>> where pedaling the one would make you spin in the opposite
>> direction… :slight_smile:
>
>Not in this case because egg beaters have two blades trhat spin in
>opposite directions


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “Dani Halutz, cryptography, EP-3 Aries”