I can free mount!

Yipee!! I got the hang of free mounting! Well, more or less :slight_smile: On Sunday, I
decided that I was fed up with trying to learn to idle, and I wanted to learn
free mounting. I went into my garage, with a print out of Tony Ferlazzo’s guide
that he posted a few days ago. After reading through it a couple of times, I got
myself into position (wearing my helmet and shin pads grin) then grabbed hold
of a beam that runs overhead in my garage. Then, supporting almost all of my
weight, I went through the motions slowly, of just getting my foot in the right
spot. Then I only used one hand on the beam, and practised jumping up while
putting all my weight on the seat. Really I was only touching the beam, mainly
for balance, but it really helped to steady me. Then I decided just to go for
it. Only problem was, I kept reaching up and instictively grabbing the beam!!!
So I moved away from it, took a deep breath, a quick prayer, and rattled of my
will, then just jumped up. I got my foot on the pedal, and balanced for a
moment, and promptly fell off. But I was so shocked that I’d done that much,
that I just jumped straight back on. A couple of tries, and I managed to go
forward a few pedals before losing my balance from the initial jitters. The
whole process only took me just under an hour, which I was ecstatic about! I
took my bike down to the park and bike trail there in that afternoon, and with
more space to maneouver (sp?) I was getting on and going about 1 in 5 attempts.
Now I’ve just got to get the hang of idling, and I’ve got the basics!

RE: I can free mount!

> I wear tennis shoes when I ride. They’re fairly thin soled giving me a real
> feel for the pedal. I’ve noticed my feet curling up, trying to grip the pedal,
> especially my toes and arch. It hurts my feet if I ride too long. Thicker
> soles don’t seem to be the answer. Putting less weight on my feet and more on
> the seat seems best, but then I tend to loose control, “uni-stumble” I call
> it. Anyone have any ideas?

There might be a problem with your shoes’ traction on the pedals. I use a highly
textured shoe (artificial turf shoes, but any knobby tread will work) and pedals
with big teeth on them. This may not be the solution for you if you’re still in
the learning stages, because you don’t want those pedals coming back at you.

But with a more secure grip between shoe and pedal, your feet can relax more as
you concentrate on the work of pedaling. Still, keep the weight on the seat and
keep telling your feet to relax. As you are still learning, there will always
be excess neurological information going to the muscles. When you ride
normally, you will probably find your body relaxing more than when you’re
working on new skills.

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone (reply to jfoss@unicycling.com)
http://www.unicycling.com

“Every once in a while, you just have to be an airplane.”

  • Andy Jennings

RE: I can free mount!

> I recently bought a pair with a rough grey pad on them. The pad doesn’t cover
> the entire pedal, but covers about half of the pedal area. The texture is
> rather like sandpaper – and it works. Great grip with no sharp bits.

The guys from Sweden used pedals like this back in the early 80’s. Those guys
(Peter Holmgren, Hakan F., Peter Rosendahl), led by Joakim Malm, the
originator of coasting, followed his lead in many things. He worked in a skate
shop, and they were heavily influenced by skateboard culture, dress, and even
riding style. Not only did we get coasting from them, they also pioneered
gliding (though that was also done in other places, like Seattle), seat
dragging, seat bouncing, and other moves made possible by the Miyata seats
with plastic bumpers.

They affixed metal plates with skateboard grip tape to their pedals, giving them
a flat yet sticky surface. Plus, no “calf tracks” or “shindentations” if the
pedal whacks you in the leg. Just one big bruise, I guess.

I also have not seen such pedals on the market. But a trip to your local
skateboard outfitter and you can get the grip tape, then do what you want with
it. It’s also handy stuff to put on your fork if you ride one footed.

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone (reply to jfoss@unicycling.com)
http://www.unicycling.com

“Every once in a while, you just have to be an airplane.”

  • Andy Jennings

Re: I can free mount!

Joel Gilmore <dragoncurve@mail.flashmail.com> wrote in article
>>>I took my bike down to the park and bike trail there in that afternoon,
and with more space to maneouver (sp?) I was getting on and going about 1 in
5 attempts.

I can hardly believe that last week I thought I’d never learn.

Last Wednesday I spent about two hours trying to freemount at my local juggling
club. This was extremely frustrating but I made several mounts from which I
could ride away. Later that evening I made several more after celebrating in the
pub (I guess I didn’t overdo the celebrations).

Since then I’ve taken every opportunity to practice and I’ve also got it down to
about 1 in 5. And some of the near misses look a lot like idling… Meanwhile,
the juggling practice has taken a nosedive.

So the point is this: if you are a beginner like me and you are convinced you
can’t do it, you are wrong. Stick with it.

I’m off to the park now to impress youngsters, to be mocked by teenagers, and to
terrify old ladies :wink:

Arnold the Aardvark

http://www.foxholly.demon.co.uk ICQ# 30592054

Re: I can free mount!

John Foss wrote:
>There might be a problem with your shoes’ traction on the pedals. I use a
>highly textured shoe (artificial turf shoes, but any knobby tread will
work)
>and pedals with big teeth on them. This may not be the solution for you if
>you’re still in the learning stages, because you don’t want those pedals coming
>back at you.

Yes, I’ve been caught by those spiky pedals. But there is an alternative. I
recently bought a pair with a rough grey pad on them. The pad doesn’t cover the
entire pedal, but covers about half of the pedal area. The texture is rather
like sandpaper – and it works. Great grip with no sharp bits.

Sorry, but I’ve no idea what they’re called. I found them when browsing in my
local bike shop.

Chas Walton chasw@webleicester.co.uk

Re: I can free mount!

Arnold the Aardvark <aardvark@foxholly.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:01bf12f9$84ef5fa0$d056989e@foxholly.demon.co.uk
> Joel Gilmore <dragoncurve@mail.flashmail.com> wrote in article
> >>>I took my bike down to the park and bike trail there in that afternoon,
> and with more space to maneouver (sp?) I was getting on and going about 1 in 5
> attempts.
>
> I can hardly believe that last week I thought I’d never learn.
>
> Last Wednesday I spent about two hours trying to freemount at my local
> juggling club. This was extremely frustrating but I made several mounts from
> which I could ride away. Later that evening I made several more after
> celebrating in the pub (I guess I didn’t overdo the celebrations).
>
> Since then I’ve taken every opportunity to practice and I’ve also got it down
> to about 1 in 5. And some of the near misses look a lot like
idling…
> Meanwhile, the juggling practice has taken a nosedive.
>
> So the point is this: if you are a beginner like me and you are convinced you
> can’t do it, you are wrong. Stick with it.
>
> I’m off to the park now to impress youngsters, to be mocked by teenagers, and
> to terrify old ladies :wink:
>
> Arnold the Aardvark
> ===========================
> http://www.foxholly.demon.co.uk ICQ# 30592054
>

Yes, the two most important tips are to stick with it and to believe you can do
it. I still have lots of trouble, being the out-of-shape person I am, but I am
improving. The greatest thing is that I’m getting in much better shape along
with doing something enjoyable. I would rather be riding than pumping weights!

I’m still not at the point of hopping on and taking off in one attempt.
That’s my goal.

I wear tennis shoes when I ride. They’re fairly thin soled giving me a real feel
for the pedal. I’ve noticed my feet curling up, trying to grip the pedal,
especially my toes and arch. It hurts my feet if I ride too long. Thicker soles
don’t seem to be the answer. Putting less weight on my feet and more on the seat
seems best, but then I tend to loose control, “uni-stumble” I call it. Anyone
have any ideas?

Tony