Hypothetically speaking.

OK, this is just hypothetical, so don’t everyone jump down my throat for asking this… :stuck_out_tongue:

Hypothetically speaking, if I were to (foolishly) choose a 29" uni as my first ride, what length cranks would be best for training purposes?

I’m not saying I’m considering, and I’m not saying I’m even going to look for one, I’m just asking what length cranks would be best were I to choose one and were I interested in using it, however ill-advised, to learn on. :thinking:

I was thinking 165-170mm.

They come with 125mm standard, but that seems awfully short for such a large wheel size, especially for people who are just starting out and would like a bit more control.

Again, I am not saying this is what I’m doing, I am just asking the question to satisfy my curiosity and, hopefully, gather some crank to wheel size ratio info. :slight_smile:

-Tim(bo)

Probably something around 150-170, but like you said, it wouldn’t be the best size wheel to learn on. Not that it would be impossible, but it’s much easier to start with a smaller wheel (even 24" if you don’t want a 20").

When I first joined this forum there was a lady on here trying to learn on a 36er and posting her progress. I think she gave up in the end from what I can remember.

Rob

I started with 125s on mine - in retrospect, this was probably a touch short for a rank beginner, although I made do with them. 170mm should be good; even 150 would probably be fine.

Also, it’s your life - you’ve requested and considered advice about what size to start on, but it’s ultimately your decision, so don’t apologize if that decision is to go against the mainline recommendation.

I started with 125s on mine - in retrospect, this was probably a touch short for a rank beginner, although I made do with them. 170mm should be good; even 150 would probably be fine.

Also, it’s your life - you’ve requested and considered advice about what size to start on, but it’s ultimately your decision, so don’t apologize if that decision is to go against the mainline recommendation.

I think the quickest and easiest way to learn to uni is to have the speed/control equation skewed towards control, not speed. On a 29’er that would be around 165’s imo. Maybe 150’s, I wouldn’t bother learning on a 29’er with shorter than 150 though if that’s your thing go for it.

I started on a secondhand Nimbus 24" with 125mm cranks. I found it pretty tough and after reading stuff on here bought some 150mm cranks. It made a huge difference to me and I found it much easier.

After 18 months riding (including the purchase of a KH24" with 165mm cranks and a KH29" with 150mm cranks) I’ve just put the 125mm cranks back on the original 24" and done a few miles on it. It’s still a very different riding experience.

So, in my experience, longer cranks are easier to learn on. They give you more control and time to react.

I know you’re not going to do it :wink: but a 29" seems a lot higher than a 24". If you were going to do it I’d recommend 165ish.

Learning on a 29" would be tough, but then again I learned on a 26"!!! I’d agree with the rest though that if you do I wouldn’t go with shorter than 150mm cranks. I think it’s possible to learn on any size wheel (eventually) but what will happen is that your learner unicycle will take quite a beating, and if you spend the $$$ on a larger wheel unicycle to learn on then that is a lot of $$$ down the drain because once you learn it is possible that that unicycle could be toast, or at least need a make over! So that is one reason your learner unicycle is fairly cheap, and the smaller wheeled unicycles are typically cheaper (and easier IMHO) to learn on. Good luck! :slight_smile:

I’d recommend 150. Plus you probably wouldn’t want anything longer anyway, unless you plan on using it for techincal MUni.

Sure you could learn to ride on a 29", but it would be a pain. If I had the choice, I’d take any 29" over the POS I originally learned on. Make sure you use a street tire rather than a knobby; that will help a lot.

150s. Anything long is unwieldy and takes away half the pleasure of owning a big wheel.

Anything shorter than 125 will be difficult to learn on.

A 29 is only 2.5" taller than a 24 - a lot of the height thing is psychological.

You guys all make it sound like I’m actually saying I intend to buy a 29, and that’s really not what I’m saying. :frowning:
I tried sitting on a friend’s 24 in his garage last night, and it just felt strange. I wasn’t able to move an inch for fear of breaking my neck. :smiley:

That’s how I see it, too. I mean it’s not like I’m suggesting starting out on a 36.

Then again, what’s the difference in roll distance between a 24 and a 29 when the wheel is rotated 180 degrees? (sorry, I suck at math).

What about dual-hole cranks, like a 137/165 or 137/150, for the best of both worlds?

As for bashing up the first uni, dorky as it may be, I was thinking of wrapping the “at-risk” parts in pipe insulation. :stuck_out_tongue: (where possible).

The dual hole Moments are 125/150, not 137/150.

You want to wrap the seat and pedals in pipe insulation? Not really realistic as that’s only going to make it yet more difficult. You’d be better buying a disposable seat and pedals. Heck, I went through 3 sets of pedals on my learner. The seat survived fine though I’m not sure how! Once I learned how to ride, I gave away the learner and bought a proper muni.

Yeah, I was just brainstorming. :stuck_out_tongue: I’ll pick up something cheap to start.

I found a Torker LX 26 for $153 and free shipping, but I’m having a little trouble with customer service.

A 29 is twenty nine twenty fourths as big.

So 29/24 = 21% bigger, which is a fifth bigger which means you go a fifth further per pedal stroke.

I ordered a Torker LX 26 tonight instead. I felt it was a good compromise between the 24 I was told I should get and the 29 (I thought) I wanted to get. :stuck_out_tongue:

hey now, don’t forget your pi, even if it’s (29pi)/(24pi) I know it cancels but jeez :cry:

Pi is totally irrelevant to the calculation.

Radius, diameter and circumference are all linear measurements (as opposed to measurements of area or volume) so as long as you compare like with like (radius with radius; diameter with diameter; or circumference with circumference) you will get the same result.

Circumference is Pi x diameter, or 2 x Pi x radius.

You are making things unnecessarily complicated by introducing Pi.

Athough multiplying both numbers by just over 3 isn’t that complicated, really.