How sharp is sharp?

OK, time for a stupid question (or two)…

In the IUF/USA skill levels, there is talk of sharp turns - 90, 180 and 360
degrees. So, what constitutes a sharp turn? Any ideas?

I’ve had a look at the USA rule book but it doesn’t appear to trouble itself
with such trivia (understandably).

While we’re on the subject of stupid questions, is a side mount from the left
counted as a different mount to one from the right? Similarly a “traditional”
freemount with the left pedal back rather than the right?

Regards, Mark.


Mark Wiggins, | markw@ftel.co.uk +44 (121) 717 6255 Fujitsu Telecom Europe
Ltd,|----------------------------------------- Solihull Parkway, | o Birmingham
Business Park, | In the land of the pedestrian, /|\ Birmingham, | the
one-wheeled man is king. << ENGLAND. | O

Re: How sharp is sharp?

At 02:04 PM 12/4/97 +0000, Mark Wiggins wrote:
>
>In the IUF/USA skill levels, there is talk of sharp turns - 90, 180 and 360
>degrees. So, what constitutes a sharp turn? Any ideas?
>
>I’ve had a look at the USA rule book but it doesn’t appear to trouble itself
>with such trivia (understandably).

The skill levels themselves are trivia to most people. What follows is not
official policy, but may spark some discussion on the subject:

I think a sharp turn should be left up to the people doing it. In the past we
have used a suggested 1 meter circle for such things, but I think “sharp” is
close enough. Less to read, and less to argue about. The turns never seem to
hold people back on their levels anyway. One of the earlier frames of reference
I used for unicycle turns, in my beginning days, was the sidewalk. Though
sidewalks come in all shapes and sizes (mine were about 1.5 meters wide), being
able to make a u-turn on it was a big deal to me in the early days.

>While we’re on the subject of stupid questions, is a side mount from the left
>counted as a different mount to one from the right? Similarly a “traditional”
>freemount with the left pedal back rather than the right?

The skill levels are designed to give the rider freedom in choosing the
(eventually) 10 mounts to be used. My own personal policy (and suggested for
everyone else) is to allow only one “mirror image” mount. So if the rider mounts
with the left foot for level I and the right foot for level II, each succeeding
mount must be of a different type, not just opposite side.

Of course this still leaves plenty of room for doubt. How much variation is
required to make the mount “different?” Side mounting from opposite sides is not
different, but a normal side mount and a side mount, leg around are definitely
different. When in doubt, ask!

John Foss, Chairman IUF Skill Levels and Rules Committee unifoss@calweb.com
http://www.calweb.com/~unifoss/

Re: How sharp is sharp?

At 18:14 8/12/97 +0100, Wolfgang Stroessner wrote:
>John Foss wrote:
>> The skill levels are designed to give the rider freedom in choosing the
>> (eventually) 10 mounts to be used. My own personal policy (and suggested for
>> everyone else) is to allow only one “mirror image” mount. So if the rider
>> mounts with the left foot for level I and the right foot for level II, each
>> succeeding mount must be of a different type, not just opposite
side.
>
>Do you expect a level n candidate to show 1+2+…+n = n*(n+1)/2 different
>mounts (1 for level 1, 2 more for level 2 and so on). Or is it sufficient to
>know n mounts, i.e. you are allowed to use the n-1 mounts you used for level
>n-1 again for level n.
>
>Ok, I’m a mathematician and there may be some people out there who don’t like
>abstract variables like this n I used above.

I think that I like Wolfgang Stroessner the unicyclist, better than Wolfgang the
mathematician. Can we get him out of school? Alberto Ruiz ruizb@coqui.net
>
>Wolfgang
>
>
> \|///
> | ~ ~ |
> (- 0 0 -) ±---------oOOo-(_)-oOOo--------------------------------
> ---------------------+
>| |
>| Wolfgang Stroessner Phone: +49 30 4537159 (home) | +49 30 2093-2352 (office)
>| | Bruesseler Str. 37 Fax: +49 30 2093-2727 (office) | 13353 Berlin eMail:
>| Stroess@Mathematik.HU-Berlin.DE | Germany
>| http://Spectrum.Mathematik.HU-Berlin.DE/~stroess | Oooo. |
>±--------.oooO-----( )----------------------------------------------------+ (
>) ) / \ ( (_/ _)
>
>
>
Alberto Ruiz ruizb@coqui.net

Re: How sharp is sharp?

At 14:04 97/12/04 +0000, Mark Wiggins wrote:
> OK, time for a stupid question (or two)…
>
> In the IUF/USA skill levels, there is talk of sharp turns - 90, 180 and 360
> degrees. So, what constitutes a sharp turn? Any ideas?
>
> I’ve had a look at the USA rule book but it doesn’t appear to trouble itself
> with such trivia (understandably).

Here is the answer, quoted from my book ANYONE CAN WRITE A UNICYCLE, which I
will be glad to send you if you like.

Start with 90 degree sharp turns. Twist your shoulders in the ! desired
direction and lean into the turn. Pedal quickly and regain your balance by
bringing your body back to the vertical. Then go on to a 180 degree half spin.
Remember to be off balance in the direction of the spin and pedal quickly under
the lean. Properly executed, this type of spin produces a smooth screeching or
scraping sound as the tire scrapes along the ground. Since this type of spin is
executed while pedalling, we shall refer to it as a “power spin.”

Stay on top, Jack Halpern, IUF Vice President

Kanji Dictionary Publishing Society, http://www.win.or.jp/~jhalpern

1-3-502 3-Chome Niiza, Niiza-shi, Saitama 352 JAPAN Voice: +81-048-481-3103 Fax:
+81-048-479-1323
========
Hiroshima '45 Chernobyl '86 Windows '95 =============

Re: How sharp is sharp?

John Foss wrote:
> The skill levels themselves are trivia to most people.

Agreed. I’m hardly a devout follower of the levels myself - but I circulate the
list around our club in the hope of providing ideas for new tri^H^H^H skills.
Just lately it occurred to me that I didn’t know what was involved in some of
the skills listed - the info on the Web page was a great help, mind.

> I think a sharp turn should be left up to the people doing it. In the past we
> have used a suggested 1 meter circle for such things, but I think “sharp” is
> close enough. Less to read, and less to argue about.

Yup. I guess I was just reading too much into it - I was wondering if you had to
pretty much turn on the spot like a short spin.

Turns on pavements (sidewalks) are useful. Last year I was out riding and a
teenager thought he’d be really smart and stand in my way - he didn’t think I’d
be able to steer around him (“no handlebar” syndrome, I guess) so I rode up to
him, rode full circle around him and then rode off. Petty, I know (but fun). :slight_smile:

> The skill levels are designed to give the rider freedom in choosing the
> (eventually) 10 mounts to be used. My own personal policy (and suggested for
> everyone else) is to allow only one “mirror image” mount. So if the rider
> mounts with the left foot for level I and the right foot for level II, each
> succeeding mount must be of a different type, not just opposite side.

Hokey dokey, we’ll adopt that as a policy.

Thanks for your help. Much appreciated.

Regards, Mark.


Mark Wiggins, | markw@ftel.co.uk +44 (121) 717 6255 Fujitsu Telecom Europe
Ltd,|----------------------------------------- Solihull Parkway, | o Birmingham
Business Park, | In the land of the pedestrian, /|\ Birmingham, | the
one-wheeled man is king. << ENGLAND. | O