How long did it take to mount a 36" with 80% accuracy

Don, where’d you get Kookas drilled at those lengths? Those aren’t the same cranks you had at Tahoe are they?

I’m now finding that my 170/150/130 cranks are not the perfect ratios. By far most of my terrain can be done on the shorter settings, and I’m not sure there is anything I’d need 170s to get up or down that I couldn’t get up or down on 160s. What I want now are some tri-tapped cranks at 115/130/160. The 160 would be for special occassions only.

I mount my 36" in the same way as I mount my 26" and 20" - a sort of almost staitic slightly rollback mount. Like a couple of people have already described, I start with one foot on the pedal (about 45* backwards and downwards) and the saddle against my crotch. Then I push the wheel forwards very slightly so the foot on the pedal comes almost up to horizontal, jump up a bit with my back foot and (unlike John Childs) step pretty hard on the pedal to get myself into a riding position. On the 26" it takes less pressure on the pedal, and on the 20" virtually none.

I find this works really well for me (perhaps because I’m quite tall) so I haven’t really bothered to practice rolling jump mounts, which seems to be the most popular coker mount with other riders I know. Mounting uphill would be easier with a rolling jump (if I could do them!), but I usually just mount sideways and turn up the hill. I also reckon my mounting technique may not work so well with short cranks where you have less torque for pulling away from a standing start (I use 150s and it can sometimes take quite a shove to get moving if the ground’s uneven).

I very rarely miss a mount now using this method, except uphill or when my legs are really tired.

Rob

Re: How long did it take to mount a 36" with 80% accuracy

I mount by holding the tyre. One foot’s already on the pedal (at 3
o’clock), reach forward and steady the mount by holding the top of the
wheel, then step up and away (or hold the stillstand, if you like).

No one ever mentions this. Perhaps it’s not ‘cool’, but it works just
fine. I mount first time about 95% of attempts.

what’s the least amount of mm you can have between each thread

Would it be possible to pull the brake instead of holding the tyre?

Another mounting issue

I also have trouble mounting my 36, I guess it might help if i practice more, but the main issue I have is the fact that I’m used to rolling back half a rotation before riding forwards, and this makes it quite difficult (though not impossible) on such a big wheel.

The other problem I’m not sure about is if my height is having an impact on it; the fact that my saddle is almost at my chest height is a bit intimidating (I’m only 5 foot 1), it means its a big jump for me to get to the pedals. If you imagine a unicycle for you the same proportion as mine is against me, do you think it would be any different for you?

Last year my mounting accuratcy of my 36" was 80-90%, This year it has dropped to a frustrating 60-70%. It’s ever since I went from 150mm 0Q to 140mm someQ cranks.

As you’ve observed it is a lot harder to mount a 36er with this method. I would recommend practicing the rolling mount with a smaller wheel, to get a little more used to it and then using it on the bigger wheel. Once I learnt both I found I use a mix of mount styles on smaller wheels but almost exclusively use the rolling mount for my 36.

I’m 6 foot 2 and my saddle also is almost at chest height (admittedly some of that is due to the T7 handle). It is a lot more intimidating when mounting if you consciously note just how high you are going to have to get up. He who hesitates gets mentally psyched out. Just go for it.

I have heard shorter people say that the method of holding the front of the tyre is useful (described earlier in this thread).

Me too, with the height thing. I’ve had a ‘coker’ for about 18 months now and I’m still not consistent or confident in free mounting. Having said that, I also don’t practice enough. But having the seat up by your chest definately makes it more difficult.

Not intending to jack this mounting thread, but 20mm between the multiple pedal holes is about as close as you want. The pedal holes themselves are 9/16" bore (about 14.3mm). So at 20mm spacing, that only leaves 5.7mm between the pedal holes.
Tom B., you want 115/130 on the short end of your proposed cranks, that means less than a millimeter between the pedal holes. Not even I would dare ride that. How about 110/130/160, or 115/135/160?

What Tom B is trying to say is that he wants to commission the blue cranks pictured here.

Come on Tom, you know you want them. :smiley:

For me it took about 5 minutes to get comfortable with it. What I usually do is walk at a medium speed to get some momentum and jump onto the uni. The trick is for you to do most of the work while getting on because the 36 isn’t very maneuverable and it’s really hard to do a “traditional” mount on it. That’s what works for me, I’ve only been riding for 3 months and I can get on 100% of the time.I hope that helps.:smiley:

Re: How long did it take to mount a 36" with 80% accuracy

I suppose you could mount by holding the brake on, though the
technique would be slightly different. It could even be easier, for
shorter riders, because the rear pedal would start lower. The wheel
and pedals would then rotate a little as you mounted, and you’d have
to release the brake at the right moment, to take over control with
the feet.

Assuming you have a brake fitted!

Give it a try and let us know.

On Nov 6, 11:11 pm, goldenchicken III wrote:
> Wheeliefine wrote:
> > I mount by holding the tyre. One foot’s already on the pedal (at 3
> > o’clock), reach forward and steady the mount by holding the top of the
> > wheel, then step up and away (or hold the stillstand, if you like).
>
> > No one ever mentions this. Perhaps it’s not ‘cool’, but it works just
> > fine. I mount first time about 95% of attempts.
>
> Would it be possible to pull the brake instead of holding the tyre?
>
> –
> goldenchicken III

I can mount on a steep downhill with a brake, and then release the brake to get going again. I don’t think it’s easier than mounting normally on the flat though?

Joe

It is your prowess for which we strive. Greg Harper, the best free-mounter ever.

Not to sound annoying, but I had it immediately.

I’ve had a 45" wheel unicycle since 1982. Do you think that might have helped? But seriously, the two cycles ride very differently. The big wheel has a narrow, hard rubber tire. It loves turning and spinning. The Coker (or similar) has a fat, wonderful air tire that makes riding long distances ever-more pleasant. But it doesn’t like to turn, it’s much happier to go straight. My early rides on Cokers had no problems with the mount, but I constantly wanted to put more air in the tire because I expected it to turn more easily! Only when I finally decided to ride it somewhere rather than around a parking lot, did I experience that big tire doing what it’s made for.

Re: How long did it take to mount a 36" with 80% accuracy

I mount by holding the tyre. One foot’s already on the pedal (at 3
o’clock), reach forward and steady the mount by holding the top of the
wheel, then step up and away (or hold the stillstand, if you like).

No one ever mentions this. Perhaps it’s not ‘cool’, but it works just
fine. I mount first time about 95% of attempts.

Re: How long did it take to mount a 36" with 80% accuracy

I mount by holding the tyre. One foot’s already on the pedal (at 3
o’clock), reach forward and steady the mount by holding the top of the
wheel, then step up and away (or hold the stillstand, if you like).

No one ever mentions this. Perhaps it’s not ‘cool’, but it works just
fine. I mount first time about 95% of attempts.

Re: How long did it take to mount a 36" with 80% accuracy

I suppose you could mount by holding the brake on, though the
technique would be slightly different. It could even be easier, for
shorter riders, because the rear pedal would start lower. The wheel
and pedals would then rotate a little as you mounted, and you’d have
to release the brake at the right moment, to take over control with
the feet.

Assuming you have a brake fitted!

Give it a try and let us know.

On Nov 6, 11:11 pm, goldenchicken III wrote:
> Wheeliefine wrote:
> > I mount by holding the tyre. One foot’s already on the pedal (at 3
> > o’clock), reach forward and steady the mount by holding the top of the
> > wheel, then step up and away (or hold the stillstand, if you like).
>
> > No one ever mentions this. Perhaps it’s not ‘cool’, but it works just
> > fine. I mount first time about 95% of attempts.
>
> Would it be possible to pull the brake instead of holding the tyre?
>
> –
> goldenchicken III

Re: How long did it take to mount a 36" with 80% accuracy

I suppose you could mount by holding the brake on, though the
technique would be slightly different. It could even be easier, for
shorter riders, because the rear pedal would start lower. The wheel
and pedals would then rotate a little as you mounted, and you’d have
to release the brake at the right moment, to take over control with
the feet.

Assuming you have a brake fitted!

Give it a try and let us know.

On Nov 6, 11:11 pm, goldenchicken III wrote:
> Wheeliefine wrote:
> > I mount by holding the tyre. One foot’s already on the pedal (at 3
> > o’clock), reach forward and steady the mount by holding the top of the
> > wheel, then step up and away (or hold the stillstand, if you like).
>
> > No one ever mentions this. Perhaps it’s not ‘cool’, but it works just
> > fine. I mount first time about 95% of attempts.
>
> Would it be possible to pull the brake instead of holding the tyre?
>
> –
> goldenchicken III