How I practice idling

I decided that this was a good way to practice idling with either foot down. I idle a few times with my left foot down, then pedal a half-revolution until my right foot is down and idle a few times with my right foot, then pedal a half-revolution to left foot idling, etc., etc. This has helped me to be able to idle at any time with either foot down.

Does anyone else practice idling like this?

Nikki

Re: How I practice idling

Sounds like a good method. I probably should try it. My idling seems to be getting worse rather than better. Last night I tried idling with my right foot (non-dominant) down and wound up flat on my kester with a nicely bruised ankle. (I retreated to working on 4 ball patterns. :frowning: )

Thanks,
Raphael Lasar
Matawan, NJ

Nikki:

I think that’s a good process. I can right-foot idle all day, but not left foot, so I’m trying to build up on the non-dominant side. I should have been working on that all along, I guess.

I still think idling is a very important early skill. As I’ve mentioned before, I used to practice it in the kitchen. I don’t like to cook, so I felt I should use the kitchen for something, and that seemed logical at the time. Now I can idle, and I still can’t cook.

Keep practicing!

(Idling, not cooking.)

Carol
Minnesota

This is, of course, utter nonsense. Anyone who was at UNICON 11 knows that Carol McClean cooks the tastiest gumballs in the US of A.

My Idling seems to be getting better everyday. I should be concentrating on my right foot more than my left foot. I’m a Right handed person and my dominated foot is my left. I start to juggle on my right hand and I play Guitar & Pool right handed. I agree with Nikki, totaly agree. I should be more concentrating more on my right foot.

David.

"…Can she idle on the right, Billy Boy, Billy Boy?
Can she idle on the right, Charming Billy?

– She can idle on the right; it’s her left that’s such a fright!
She’s a young thing, and cannot leave her muuuuuther."

la-la-la

Re: How I practice idling

Hi Nikki,

This is how I practice idling in general (left foot down for me). I idle as many times as I can then ride before I loose it and idle again… etc.

Cheers,
Jason

Ideling

:thinking: When you idle, I understand the concept, but how do you keep from falling to the left or right? I tend to fall to the right, I know others have this problem, how do you overcome or solve this ? I can ride the 50 meters and mount ok but still fall to the side no matter how I try to correct this? any suggestions? Uni-On…Keithmj

P.S. joemarshall, I sent you a Private Message:D

Re: Ideling

[QUOTE]
Originally posted by Keithmj
[B] :thinking: When you idle, I understand the concept, but how do you keep from falling to the left or right? I tend to fall to the right, I know others have this problem, how do you overcome or solve this ? I can ride the 50 meters and mount ok but still fall to the side no matter how I try to correct this? any suggestions? Uni-On…Keithmj

Find a good practice spot, one with support on both sides, mount, begin to idle, then LET GO AND TRY TO STAY UP. I don’t know why, but this takes effort to learn. If I could I would tell you how to do it I would, but I can’t; I just kind of do it myself. Give it about ten minutes of practice a day and I bet you see a lot of progress in three weeks.
Good Luck, carjug

First, the practising technique. Yes, that makes sense: a few on the right, half a turn then a few on the left, half a turn and a few on the right.

In some ways this is more constructive than simply going for the maximum number of strokes before falling off.

I suggest this as an alternative: a few on the left; half turn forwards; a few on the right; half turn BACKWARDS; a few on the left. Also, try the super-idle in which the wheel does 9approx.) one and a half turns each way instead of (approx.) half a turn.

The thing is to get confident about keeping the uni the right way up whilst occupying a fairly small patch of ground. Idling is an important safety/control skill as well as fun.

Other good things to try: idle and turn the uni a few degrees with each stroke, so that eventually, you’ve rotated 360 degrees. Try this each way. Find a slope/ramp (a yacht club slipway is ideal ;0) ) and idle on that, turning so that sometimes you’re idling UP the slope, and sometimes DOWN.

And turning to the second question: you stop the uni from falling over sideways by doing N, W or M movements with the wheel (or S movements). Also, don’t change pedal direction prematurely.

The idle is a series of transfers between two unstable positions: falling backwards, and falling forwards. Don’t start to pedal backwards until you’re falling backwards; don’t start to pedal forwards until you’re falling forwards. You have loads more time than you think.

And look as far away as you can. I practised for hours in a car park near the river, staring at a tree on the opposite bank. It makes a real difference. (Although the tree did report me for harrassment.)

Re: How I practice idling

I’ve tried that. One “tool” I’ve found helpful both for idling practice and for riding-backwards practice is a set of ski poles. This allows me to minimize the number of falls…regardless of which foot you’re practicing with, you can use the poles to make micro-adjustments and keep idling. To practice my backward, I work up incrementally…a full-cycle forward, a full cycle backward, two full pedals forward, two full pedals backward, etc. That’s been working pretty well, and again, just use the ski poles to catch your balance if necessary. Then practice keeping them in your hands but NOT using them, so they don’t become a crutch.
Tip: if you don’t want to trash your poles on the pavement, impale an old tennis ball over each of the tips.

Tom

Yeah, that’s a good idea. That would probably help me in learning to ride backwards, as well. I’m having trouble learning to ride backwards. I think it’s because it’s scary. :astonished:

Nikki

Yes Nikki I’m with you on backwards riding. But I’m not offended on backward riding, but I not there yet and yes I will try out what Mike said. It can be a bit scary too. Idling wise, I’m pretty good at it.

David.

I wish I practied with both legs equally. I can ride one footed with my left, but i can only one foot idle with my right. Its is more impressive, i think, to be able to have both legs at an equal skill level than having just one leg at a much higher skill level than the other. This includes all tricks and mounts (try a kick-up or suicide with the other foot).

Its just like riding forward. Just take everything you used to ride forward and reverse it.

Try riding a BC wheel. :slight_smile:

Re: How I practice idling

On Sun, 13 Apr 2003 03:51:48 -0500, djm
<djm.ltgeb@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>I play Guitar & Pool right handed.

Not that it matters much to me, but don’t you play guitar two-handed?
Pool makes a bit more sense, but even then, try it with one hand in
your pocket.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

"The longest place name still in use is Taumatawhakatangihangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapikimaunga-horonukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu, for a New Zealand hill. "

Re: How I practice idling

On Sun, 13 Apr 2003 12:19:20 -0500, Keithmj
<Keithmj.lu40a@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

> :thinking: When you idle, I understand the concept, but how do you keep
>from falling to the left or right?

The same way as how you keep from falling sideways during normal
forward riding. You twist the unicycle to ride the support point back
under you. Keep in mind that in the backwards stroke of idling, and in
continuous backwards riding too, you have to twist in the other
direction. This can be confusing at first. Don’t think too much about
it though, but practice practice practice.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

"The longest place name still in use is Taumatawhakatangihangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapikimaunga-horonukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu, for a New Zealand hill. "

Re: How I practice idling

In article <3e9b0b5f.2356287@newszilla.xs4all.nl>,
Klaas Bil <klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> wrote:
)On Sun, 13 Apr 2003 03:51:48 -0500, djm
)<djm.ltgeb@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:
)
)>I play Guitar & Pool right handed.
)
)Not that it matters much to me, but don’t you play guitar two-handed?
)Pool makes a bit more sense, but even then, try it with one hand in
)your pocket.

You’re probably just being silly, but it’s as possible to play pool or
guitar one-handed as it is to idle one-footed.

The “handedness” of pool or guitar is based on what your dominant
hand is doing.
-Tom

Re: How I practice idling

Klaas Bil wrote:
> On Sun, 13 Apr 2003 03:51:48 -0500, djm
> <djm.ltgeb@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:
>
>> I play Guitar & Pool right handed.
>
> Not that it matters much to me, but don’t you play guitar two-handed?
> Pool makes a bit more sense, but even then, try it with one hand in
> your pocket.
>
> Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

Sure, you bat with both hands too, but batting left-handed means you’re to
the right of the plate with your left hand higher on the bat than the right;
shooting pool left-handed means you hold the shaft with your left hand and
stroke through your right hand’s fingers; playing guitar left-handed means
you strum with your <heck if I know> hand and pluck with your other hand; a
left-hand shower means your left hand throws high and your right hand throws
across; et cetera.


Success is goals.
–Lloyd Conant

I’ll clear this up, some don’t get it.
I Play Pool right handed with 2 hands. One: is the cueing arm ( My right hand is one) and Two: is my Bridging arm/hand. Right.
And as for the Guitar, I play/Strum Right handed. ( My left hand is for fingering) Get it. That’s what I’m saying to some folks out there and they understand the term what I’m saying. And I play Cricket both hands too. Because I’m a right handed person means That I’m not stupid enough to do left handed duties too. I can even open a can opener on my left hand too. That’s too easy. My topic is now Close. Thanks guys who understand me.

David.

Oops. I forgot Thanks Tom & Scott.

Re: Re: How I practice idling

Your interjection <heck if I know> proves my point that it is not so evident what the dominant hand is in guitar playing. BTW, strumming and plucking is done with the same hand, fingering with the other hand.

As it happens, I play guitar myself and use my left hand for fingering which is the typical arrangement for right-handed people like me, and even for many lefties since a ‘left-handed’ guitar is somewhat rare.

Klaas Bil