Hopping question, another

At the Philly Juggling festival I was given a tip regarding hopping and jumping rope. (Note: I’m nowhere close to this, but would like to work towards it):

Once the pedals/cranks are parallel to the ground turn the forward foot in and slip it under a spoke. This makes it possible to keep the uni and human in synch when jumping and requires less gripping of the seat with the legs, I was told.

Anyone have experience with this method?

Thanks again,
Raphael Lasar
Matawan, NJ

Re: Hopping question, another

JJuggle wrote:
> At the Philly Juggling festival I was given a tip regarding hopping and
> jumping rope. (Note: I’m nowhere close to this, but would like to work
> towards it):
>
> Once the pedals/cranks are parallel to the ground turn the forward foot
> in and slip it under a spoke. This makes it possible to keep the uni and
> human in synch when jumping and requires less gripping of the seat with
> the legs, I was told.

I don’t quite go as far as toes in spokes but I do bring my feet in so
that they stand on the cranks. This helps to grip the unicycle - and
places less stress on the axle/cranks/pedals.

I think Paul Selwood uses the toe-in-spoke method to good effect…

Regards,
Mark.

danger

When I hop with no hands simply squeeze hard with my thighs and hop. Putting your foot in your spokes sounds kinda dangerous to me, if you have a upd I could see your foot becoming trapped and some breakage or sliceage happening from the spokes.

If your planning on trying this I think I would suggest it barefoot so you get more grip. When three toes are lodged in your wheel in a bloody mess your foot will thank you.

The best tip given to was when trying hopping and skipping was to have a skip without the uni first. Most people don’t skip very often so this ‘skill’ requires a bit of practice.

For marathon hopping you could try bringing your front foot back and your back foot foreward so you are standing on the axle.

I just squeeze the seat with my legs. This works fine for a performance of rope jumping, where you do it for 30 seconds or less. What hurts is the learning process, where you do it for tons of time.

Standing on the cranks may be a help, but if you can’t flex your ankles you’re losing a lot of what you jump with. I don’t know if I’ve tried that.

A toe in the spokes may be helpful also, but you’ll want to get real comforatable with the position. Like anything else, to avoid falling in a compromising position, practice dismounts in all directions from this position. Then when it happens for real, you’ll react “instinctively” and be fine.

Anybody know Peck’s method for no-hand hopping? In the land of N-H2, he’s King… Judge & Jury!

-Christopher

I think he would say he’s just Judge. :stuck_out_tongue:

Since he does mid-ride hopping in the middle of a rock field, I would assume he’s just gripping the seat with his legs.

Re: Hopping question, another

On Wed, 13 Nov 2002 13:09:36 -0600, johnfoss
<johnfoss.e2mfn@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>
>rhysling wrote:
>> *Anybody know Peck’s method for no-hand hopping? In the land of
>> N-H2, he’s King… Judge & Jury! *
> I think he would say he’s just Judge. :stuck_out_tongue:
>
>Since he does mid-ride hopping in the middle of a rock field, I would
>assume he’s just gripping the seat with his legs.

I’ve heard that George even hops his UW. So how does he grip THAT?
Feet/calves?

Klaas Bil

The white part of your fingernail is called lunula.