hints on idling?

Could anyone give me any hints that would help me to idle easier?
I’ve got a 24" (which I absolutely love, and use all the time), and a 20"
for the kids to learn.
I’ve tried idling (staying in one spot) with both, but can’t decide which
would be easier to learn with. I’m more comfortable with the 24" (I can get
the seat post higher), but I’ve been told a smaller wheel is easier to learn
on, even though I learned on the bigger uni, then got the smaller one.
Thanks to all.
marc_70@REMOVETHISyahoo.com


Remove the OBVIOUS to autoreply.

Idling just takes practice, give it several weeks at least.

I found that it’s best to get away from the wall as soon as possible.

If I were you I’d find a nice field and go out on the 24 and keep trying freemounting into an idle. The fact that you’re on grass won’t be a big issue on the 24, and it’ll provide a nicer landing when you fall.

I don’t know what freemount you use, but a rollback works well for idling.

I dispute the often quoted belief that it’s easier to learn stuff on a 20"-er, I reckon you need to practise on the uni that you intend to ride most.

For myself, after a year of riding a 24x3 muniand, more recently, a 29-er, I find that I can’t ride a 20"-er- when I try to mount it shoots off like a greased gerbil!

And, as I said above, with the 24 you’ve got the option of practising in a nice soft field.

1wheeldave told the truth… just practice! --chirokid–

Yep. Lots of practice.

I’d recommend the 20 if it fits you; otherwise the 24. My opinion: you definitely do not want the seat low. It’s much easier (to balance and less work and to learn) to idle with your low-foot leg almost straight.

For just ‘starting’ a door frame provides nice side-to-side support while you start to get the front to back balance.

Do not look down; stare at a spot out in front of you.

Try to get the weight off your feet and onto the seat - once stable, there should be little or no weight on your high foot. (For example: My right foot down idling has been pretty solid for a while, and a week ago I discovered I could idle one footed - all I had to do was find out where to place my left foot on the frame; took me all of 3 minutes to ‘learn’ this one foot idling)

As I started to get the hang of it, I had major trouble keeping the idling in place side-to-side. Correct this by: leaning hips to correct, and/or squeezing thighs closer together, or leaning seat more against the inside of the opposite thigh, or changing the amount of weight on the high foot, or pushing sideways inward or outward with the high foot. Once ‘centered’ again, remember to get your wieght back on the seat. (Some of these techniques I learned when learning rite foot idling, others when I while (re)learning left footed).

Practice lots! When you’re standing or pacing around chatting, thinking, smoking, etc., do not stand or pace - Idle!

Yes, it takes practice, but… you need to know what to practise!

If you use the search function in this forum you will find several threads giving advice.

It is approximately as easy to idle on a 20 with 125s as on a 24 with 150s. However, learning idling is a bit easier on the smaller wheel.

Pump the tyre up good and hard.

The movement is with the bottom foot. The bottom pedal moves from about 4 on the clock face to about 8. (Ideally from about 5 to about 7.)

The idle movement is arhythmic changing between two positions:

  1. Wheel slightly in front, unicycle aboutto fall backwards, and
  2. Wheel slightly behind, unicycle about to fall forwards.

Keep your head still and let the unicycle swing underneath you like a pendulum.

Keep your weight on the saddle.

Use mainly the bottom foot.

Keep your body (torso, trunk) upright.

Focus your eyes on something at least 20 yard/metres away. Don’t look down.

Start by riding forwards, stopping, then riding forwards.

Then ride forwards, stop and use the back stroke of the pedal to pass the unicycle under you so that you dismount off the front.

Then ride forwards, stop, let the wheel pass back underneath you then ride off again, all without dismounting.

Then it’s a matter of building this sequence of movements. Count the pedal strokes.

In an hour or so of honest practice, you should find you’re making progress. You probably won’t be idling, but you will be able to see how it can be done.

And finally, swapping between wheel sizes isn’t as big a thing as some have suggested. I find that if I ride the Coker for a long time then get ontot he 20, the 20 is skittish and feels wrong for a minute or two, but I soon adjust.

The difference between a 20 and 24, or 24 and 26 is less significant, although it can take a little while to adjust your freemount.

Crank size can make more difference than wheel size when trying to swap skills from one uni to another.

Loosen your waist. Think “I’m a sexy hula dancer”.

I learned quicker when a friend suggested driving the motion with the top foot. This move really helped me. It has been easy to unlearn. Unlearn it as soon as you can so it doesn’t become permanent bad form. (because you’ll soon want to try one foot idling where there ain’t no top foot).

Practice the other foot down from the beginning. May as well. That way, when you start to get tired you can switch.

Keep the arms out. (at least initially)

Practise - Practise - Practise. It took me for a week and I agree with all the others. Let us know how you got on.

David

Re: hints on idling?

Thanks again to all, it was what I thought, practice, practice, practice.
But some of you did give me other hints to try (low foot as straight down as
possible), something else to try.


Remove the OBVIOUS to autoreply.
“Mikefule” <Mikefule.sjvhk@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:Mikefule.sjvhk@timelimit.unicyclist.com
>
> Yes, it takes practice, but… you need to know what to practise!
>
> If you use the search function in this forum you will find several
> threads giving advice.
>
> It is approximately as easy to idle on a 20 with 125s as on a 24 with
> 150s. However, learning idling is a bit easier on the smaller wheel.
>
> Pump the tyre up good and hard.
>
> The movement is with the bottom foot. The bottom pedal moves from about
> 4 on the clock face to about 8. (Ideally from about 5 to about 7.)
>
> The idle movement is arhythmic changing between two positions:
> 1) Wheel slightly in front, unicycle aboutto fall backwards, and
> 2) Wheel slightly behind, unicycle about to fall forwards.
>
> Keep your head still and let the unicycle swing underneath you like a
> pendulum.
>
> Keep your weight on the saddle.
>
> Use mainly the bottom foot.
>
> Keep your body (torso, trunk) upright.
>
> Focus your eyes on something at least 20 yard/metres away. Don’t look
> down.
>
> Start by riding forwards, stopping, then riding forwards.
>
> Then ride forwards, stop and use the back stroke of the pedal to pass
> the unicycle under you so that you dismount off the front.
>
> Then ride forwards, stop, let the wheel pass back underneath you then
> ride off again, all without dismounting.
>
> Then it’s a matter of building this sequence of movements. Count the
> pedal strokes.
>
> In an hour or so of honest practice, you should find you’re making
> progress. You probably won’t be idling, but you will be able to see how
> it can be done.
>
> And finally, swapping between wheel sizes isn’t as big a thing as some
> have suggested. I find that if I ride the Coker for a long time then
> get ontot he 20, the 20 is skittish and feels wrong for a minute or two,
> but I soon adjust.
>
> The difference between a 20 and 24, or 24 and 26 is less significant,
> although it can take a little while to adjust your freemount.
>
> Crank size can make more difference than wheel size when trying to swap
> skills from one uni to another.
>
>
> –
> Mikefule - Roland Hope School of Unicycling
>
> “Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we
> fall.”
> Confucius
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Mikefule’s Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/879
> View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/27317
>