Hints for novice ?

OK, I’ll admit it : I’m a complete novice. I’m buying a unicycle at the end of
the week, and, basically, was wondering if anyone out there had any useful tips
to get me started.

I know I should go to a club first, but geographical problems mean I can’t. So
… over to you, guys.

Rich

Re: Hints for novice ?

Rich (CEN93026@ibm3090.bham.ac.uk) Asksthe best way to ride a unicycle:

Here is an easy three step method of learning to ride a unicycle:

  1. Get on Unicycle
  2. Fall off
  3. Go to (1)

There is a steep learning curve involved with unicycling, so don’t get
discouraged. While many people I know took far less, it took me 3 weeks of
continous practice before I got more than 10 feet from my starting position.
From then on learning new tricks was a piece of cake (usually!).

   There's no magic solution, just hints at what might work. For me,
 going up and down a university dormitory with a narrow hallway worked
  wonders for me. I would hold both walls, then pedal without touching
 the walls, then grab the walls when I felt out of balance. Eventually
 I would go 1 revolution, 3 revolutions, a dozen revolutions at a time.

I’ve heard of people using things like 2 (very patient!) friends or even
crutches. All of them require dedication and practice.

Motivation was easy for me. I’d spent $180 on the damn unicycle, and that was a
lot of money for a poor college student! No way was it going to sit in a
closet, especially when I could have gotten a bicycle for the same money!

                                             Derrick

Re: Hints for novice ?


> OK, I’ll admit it : I’m a complete novice. I’m buying a unicycle at the end
> of the week, and, basically, was wondering if anyone out there had any useful
> tips to get me started.
>
> I know I should go to a club first, but geographical problems mean I can’t.
> So … over to you, guys.
>
> Rich

I am a big proponent of the getting friends to help school. I do not like
falling down!

I learned by the MIT Unicycle Club method:

  1. Get two friends to stand on either side of you and get up on the unicycle
    with your arms around their shoulders.

  2. Sit up straight; look straight ahead; weight on seat, not on pedals. Rock the
    pedals to get a sense of balance. Get the pedals level; this is when you are
    in control.

  3. Pedal half turns then stop. Then full turns, two turns, etc. Doing multiples
    of half turns (from pedals level to pedals level again) is harder than
    continuously pedaling, but keeps you in control.

  4. Switch to holding on to your friends’ wrists.

  5. Switch to holding on to one friend’s wrist.

  6. Go off and use a wall instead of your one friend.

Steps 1-5 should not take more than an hour (perhaps in 10 minute sessions). The
thing I liked about learning this way is that I never hurt myself in the
process. I have used this technique to teach a couple of dozen people.

For some people, the get on, fall off do-it-yourself cycle works best. It’s a
matter of personality!

Hope this helps…

Best wishes, Robert Bernstein Santa Barbara, CA

Re: Hints for novice ?

> Here is an easy three step method of learning to ride a unicycle:
>
> 1) Get on Unicycle
> 2) Fall off
> 3) Go to (1)

Too true. It is a difficult, albeit worthwhile, task to learn how to ride a
unicycle. The method, filed under the heading ‘worked for me,’ I used was the
hang on to a fence with one hand, hold the uni in the other. Position the
pedals so that you are mounting with your strong foot, in other words, your
strong foot’s pedal will be positioned between 7 and 8 o’clock. To mount the
uni, position the saddle comfortably in your crotch (someone came up with a
wonderful euphemism when describing this before referring to it as ‘that place
between your legs’), push down with your strong foot (on the pedal, not the
ground), as the other pedal comes around, put your other foot thereupon and
pull the pedal back so that the pedals are parllel to the ground. Now stand up
and lock the seat between your legs with your knees. Feel the balance as you
are standing. Sit back down on the seat and advance forward one half rotation,
stop, stand up, and lock the seat between your legs. You can repeat this until
you feel comfortable with the balance of the uni. Then you can progress to
full rotations, one and half rotations, and so on. Once you are comfortable
with this, you can try going forward in half rotation increments while
remaining seated.


Mark Olson || Mark_Olson@sterling.com -or- uunet!sparky!marko