high friction tire?

There seems to be construction going on near the best hills on campus.
This means, though the hills are nicely paved, there’s likely to be dust
and dirt around. When I try gliding down these hills, I can only make it a
few meters, before there is so little friction between my foot and the
tire that I cannot maintain stability.

Does anyone know if certain types of tires might help maintain better
friction? Or, might there be knobby tires which are somewhat resistant to
wear (my current tire is somewhat knobby, but is getting closer to being
slick every day).

(I’m looking for a 20" tire, thinner than 2.0"… though, if there’s
any generic advice on how to spot different tire types, I’d find that
most useful.)

Jeff Lutkus

Sent via the Unicyclist Community - http://Unicyclist.com

> Does anyone know if certain types of tires might help maintain better
> friction? Or, might there be knobby tires which are somewhat resistant
> to wear (my current tire is somewhat knobby, but is getting closer to
> being slick every day).
>
> (I’m looking for a 20" tire, thinner than 2.0"… though, if there’s any
> generic advice on how to spot different tire types, I’d find that most
> useful.)

Knobby tires work better for gliding on dust and dirt, but they will tend
to wear faster (and mark floors if you ride indoors). Recently I played
with some gliding with the Kenda Colossal tire on my MUni (26 x 2.6"). Due
to the shape of the tread, it works very well for gliding while still
having adequate tread for the dirt.

Generally, a knobby tire will improve gliding in dust, but a smooth
tire will still be better for gliding on clean ground, as well as
other things…

Good luck, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“Our time is a most precious commodity, but it’s how we spend it that
makes us rich.” - John Foss

> Knobby tires work better for gliding on dust and dirt, but they will
> tend to wear faster (and mark floors if you ride indoors).

Why do they wear faster, and mark more? Is it that non-marking tires tend
to be made of different (more dense, I would presume) material?

jl

Sent via the Unicyclist Community - http://Unicyclist.com

Jeff Lutkus wrote:

> > Knobby tires work better for gliding on dust and dirt, but they will
> > tend to wear faster (and mark floors if you ride indoors).
>
> Why do they wear faster, and mark more? Is it that non-marking tires
> tend to be made of different (more dense, I would presume) material?
>
> jl

My guess would be becuase there is less metrial touching the tire when
gliding and such, so less area gets more presure, when combined with
swiveling they tend to wear faster. the reason they mark, I would
guess, is that they are made for outdoor use. and to get better grip
on dirt/rocks and such, they are less dense than Freestyle tires,
which are made to take swiveling abuse on concrete and that type of
thing. I could yet be wrong. Max Dingemans

Jeff Lutkus wrote:

> > Knobby tires work better for gliding on dust and dirt, but they will
> > tend to wear faster (and mark floors if you ride indoors).
>
> Why do they wear faster, and mark more? Is it that non-marking tires
> tend to be made of different (more dense, I would presume) material?
>
> jl

My guess would be becuase there is less metrial touching the tire when
gliding and such, so less area gets more presure, when combined with
swiveling they tend to wear faster. the reason they mark, I would
guess, is that they are made for outdoor use. and to get better grip
on dirt/rocks and such, they are less dense than Freestyle tires,
which are made to take swiveling abuse on concrete and that type of
thing. I could yet be wrong. Max Dingemans

> > Why do they wear faster, and mark more? Is it that non-marking
> tires tend
> > to be made of different (more dense, I would presume) material?
> >
> > jl
>
> My guess would be becuase there is less metrial touching the tire
> when gliding and such, so less area gets more presure, when combined
> with swiveling they tend to wear faster. the reason they mark, I
> would guess, is that they are made for outdoor use.

Agree and agree. Knobbies have less rubber on the ground, and it’s on the
end of flexible knobs that are just going to get more stress on them,
especially when you turn sharp on pavement.

As for hardness of rubber, it’s more a question of specific tires and not
a hard rule. Most knobbies are not made with indoor use in mind, and
they’re usually black with is the more likely color to mark.

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“Our time is a most precious commodity, but it’s how we spend it that
makes us rich.” - John Foss

Typically tires (automotive, motorcycle) have a high loading of carbon
black in them. The carbon black is an important part of the thermoset
rubber process. It is especially important if you are going 70 mph on
110°F asphalt (I don’t think I’ll be doing that very soon). Black
non-marking tires will have very little carbon black or none if a dye is
used. Colored non-marking tires will have no carbon black. Soft carbon
black rubber will give the best traction for a given tread design.

Doug

“dingeman” <dingeman@citilink.com> wrote in message
news:3BC87AC9.1FB0DA7D@citilink.com
>
>
> Jeff Lutkus wrote:
>
> > > Knobby tires work better for gliding on dust and dirt, but they will
> > > tend to wear faster (and mark floors if you ride indoors).
> >
> > Why do they wear faster, and mark more? Is it that non-marking tires
tend
> > to be made of different (more dense, I would presume) material?
> >
> > jl
>
> My guess would be becuase there is less metrial touching the tire
> when gliding and such, so less area gets more presure, when combined
> with
swiveling
> they tend to wear faster. the reason they mark, I would guess, is that
they
> are made for outdoor use. and to get better grip on dirt/rocks and such,
they
> are less dense than Freestyle tires, which are made to take swiveling
abuse on
> concrete and that type of thing. I could yet be wrong. Max Dingemans