help with knee wierdness

i have this weird knee problem that just came up in the last week.its like my right knee cap is moveing accross a bump,this doesnt hurt (yet) but i dont like the sensation.its like a bump, bump, bump, feeling during a full on power stroke.

it only happens when im out of the seat,and no matter how hard i push while seated it doesnt do it :thinking:

does this sound familiar to any of you folks with knee problems?

Not the dreaded bump,bump,bump!
Dude you are so screwed. Put away your UNI forever!

J/K I have no idea what the problem is, since it doesn’t involve pain it isn’t similiar to any problems I have. I will try guessing though, something is not tracking right, or you have a little scar tissue. I would do some hamstring strengthening exercises and stretch alot. If it isn’t hurting, you are probably catching it early and can correct it with a little prevention. I started doing occasional strenghtening/stretching and I have no more problems.

:thinking:

That is not a bad sign yet ! My dad is Doctor and he always says
: As lang it doesn’t hurt it is ok ! Most of the time he was right !

I wouldn’t care about it ! The worst thing that could happen is not bad enough ! Ha Ha

Re: help with knee wierdness

no, but it doesn’t sound promising either
i’d suggest getting a pro-opinion as soon as u can
u don’t want to mess with your knees!

We Morris dancers get terrible knee problems. There is actually a medical condition colloquially known in the medical profession as ‘Morris man’s knee’.

One part of the problem can be inequal development of the muscles either side of the knee cap.

I suggest you get to a sports injury clinic for advice. When I had a problem, the physio showed me a way of taping the knee to hold the bits in place, and he showed me a set of exercises to develop the weaker muscles.

A normal GP/family doctor will say, “If it isn’t hurting except when you unicycle, don’t unicycle.” A sports injury clinic physio will say, “If your injury is hampering your sports performance, I’ll try to help you.”

It costs a few quid, but in my case, it’s always been money well spent.

sure,i’d love to go see a pro and have them look at my knee but here in America we have no health care.if i went to one i would be money trouble the minute i walked in the door.

if i was an illegal alien i would just walk into the emergency room,point to my knee and enjoy the free ride.

I’ve never yet had physiotherapy or any sports injury treatment on the National Health Service. Over here, Sports Injury Clinics are private and run for profit. They specialise in treatment for minor niggles, sprains and the like. You tend to get a 20 minute consultation the first time, and a short session thereafter. At UK prices, I’d expect to pay around £30 ($45?) for the first session, and a bit less for the later ones. Total cost of putting right an annoying problem? Less than the cost of the uni you can’t ride if the problem gets too bad.

We’re not talking major surgery. We’re talking maintenance and adjustment. You don’t get your car/automobile fixed free by the government. Look into the cost of a Sports Injury Clinic appointment. You might be pleasantly surprised. They can only charge what the market can afford to pay.

Either way, I hope you get it sorted out.

can’t you just prtetend you are an ilegal alien?

if you cant fake a foriegn accent then you could pretend that you are mute, you could write things down on a bit of paper and occasionaly pretend that you misunderstood the doctor

p.s.
its more of a case of the u.s. government crapping on its own people rather than preferentialy treating illigal imigrants
all people deserve free healthcare.

an commie like me would always remind you to blame the bosses, not the people the bosses tell you to blame.:wink:

A male under the age of 30 in the US can get an HMO for around $80 a month. I have done it when I didn’t have it provided, so has my younger brother. It doesn’t take much of a fall on your Uni to justify the cost. I recently had to go to the emergency room for stitches, and the total cost was $800. If I had a broken bone or something worse, I would be really hurting w/o insurance.

Re: help with knee wierdness

While stranded on the hard shoulder of the information super highway Mikefule.nffo1@timelimit.unicyclist.com typed:
>
> One part of the problem can be inequal development of the muscles either
> side of the knee cap.
>
> I suggest you get to a sports injury clinic for advice. When I had a
> problem, the physio showed me a way of taping the knee to hold the bits
> in place, and he showed me a set of exercises to develop the weaker
> muscles.
>
> A normal GP/family doctor will say, “If it isn’t hurting except when you
> unicycle, don’t unicycle.” A sports injury clinic physio will say, “If
> your injury is hampering your sports performance, I’ll try to help
> you.”

DISCLAIMER: I’m not a doctor and I don’t play one on TV.
Here is some good info that I pinched from a medical encyclopedia a couple
of years ago. What you do with it, is on your own head (or knee I 'spose).

Chondromalacia

A degenerative condition of the patellar cartilage usually occuring in
young adults and sometimes following injury, It may be painfull but is
often painless, and can cause intermittent effusions into the knee joints.
The cartilage on the posterior aspect of the patella becomes roughened.

Chondromalacia refers to wear and tear (destruction) of the articular
cartilage without signs of OA. Most usually it affects the patello
femoral joint causing a characteristic clinical entity called
‘patello femoral syndrome’ or ‘patellor chondropathy’. Articular
cartilage of the patella becomes involved in a process that leads to
softening, cracking and wearing away of the surface. This syndrome can
occur at any age but is most frequently seen in teenagers and young adults
and its onset if often insidious.

The basic aetiology of chondromalacia is unknown, but overuse or acute
patellar contusion can often be found in conjunction with the onset of
symptoms. Many predisposing factors have been found, such as abnormal
distal or proximal placement of the patella; excessive patella laxity and
sublaxaction; lower extremity malalignments (ankle hyperpronation,
external tibial torsion, excessive Q-angle, increased femoral anteversion,
leg length inequality); and hypoplastic vastus medialis obliquus of the
quadriceps muscle. These factors may predispose the patella to lateral
displacement particularly when vigorous quadriceps contraction occurs.

Clinically, the patient with chondromalacia presents pain in the front
of the knee. It is characteristically aggrivated by activities such as
running, climbing stairs or kneeling and is relieved by rest. The pain
is made worse by prolonged sitting with the knee bent, such as when
one attends the cinema or theatre. After prolonged sitting,
rectropatellar pain and stiffness on initiating activity is also typical.

Patellar chondromalacia, when present, typically appears in sporting
activity like running and jumping, and very often makes continuation
impossible. At rest, the symptoms are quickly relieved. These overuse
symptoms can be alleviated more permanently by a quadriceps muscle
exercise program, a patellar knee brace and anti-inflammatory medication.
If symptoms are extremely severe and persistent, an abnormal patellofemoral
tracking mechanism (lateral subluxation) can be treated surgically.

Since patellar chondromalacia is often associated with patellar laxity
and subluxation, these patients can have an increased risk of a complete
luxation of the patella during activity. In prevention of complete
luxation, all the above mentioned measures must be performed. If a
complete patellar luxation does occurs, surgery is often needed.


Trog Woolley | trog at trog hyphen oz dot demon dot co dot uk
(A Croweater back residing in Pommie Land with Linux)
Isis Astarte Diana Hecate Demeter Kali Inanna

Sit and enjoy it…

[QUOTE]
Originally posted by MauMau
[B] :thinking:

That is not a bad sign yet ! My dad is Doctor and he always says
: As lang it doesn’t hurt it is ok ! Most of the time he was right !

I wouldn’t care about it ! The worst thing that could happen is not bad enough ! Ha Ha [/B][/QUOTE I fully agree with the advice of Mau Mau Dad. Being trauma-ortho surgeon ,for a long time ,I apply above mentioned prescripion to myselve. All clicks and clonks in my knees . but…does not hurt. Some advice ,at times only, I could give to others. In a nut shell. If a surgeon operates on a symptomless condition …almost certainly he will produce a symptoms. :astonished: Take it or leave it.