Helmet Issue

Although I don’t ride, I am a mother of two riders under the age of 15. Helmets
are not an issue for us. It works one way, the unicycle doesn’t move without the
helmet on the head. Our team uses helmets for ALL riding purposes not just track
or Muni. It doesn’t hamper their ability to perform or function. As for the shin
gards, I may consider them for the days I help at practice! Barb Kowalski

Re: Helmet Issue

>I’m teaching my niece to ride and I didn’t think anything of her just getting
>up on my 20" just to give it a try. Then her father came to
pick
>her up. She will be wearing a helmet in the future! I don’t see any reason to
>fight it. Safety gear is there to protect the rider. It
being
>worn won’t deminish the one wheel’d experience!

I can see wearing helmets when doing Muni or riding fast. However, I have never,
not once, fallen on my head. I think the slow speed of 20" and 24" unis make it
less important to have protection, but I plan to wear a helmet for the Minnesota
Ride this summer (if only to please my mother!). :slight_smile:

Tammy Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

Re: Helmet Issue

Safety Gear: My falls are dramatic and artistic. Usually I’m heading down a
steep singletrack when my wheel hangs up on a root and I’m launched headfirst
into the rocks and stumps at the bottom of the trail. Last year I broke a
wrist–but this was when I was learning to cycle backwards on rocky gravel. I
have tried a variety of basic safety gear and can make some recommendations:

I like Cheapskater in New York City: http://www.cheapskater.com

I always wear a bike helmet and wrist guards. The wrist guards I like are:
Triple Eight: Hired Hands Aggressive Wrist Guards (picture at the
Cheapskater website).

I hate knee guards and avoid them unless I know I’ll be falling a lot. Then I
wear: Triple Eight: Second Skin Padded Knee Gaskets–picture at the Cheapskater
website. I also have a pair of Rollerblade knee pads that have plastic caps. I
find them kind of tight on the backs of my knees.

I like to ride a bit beyond my ability. Given my ability level I more or less
have to if I’m going to ride at all. A bit of safety gear allows me to beat
myself up without having to stop.

David Maxfield Bainbridge Island, WA

Re: Helmet Issue

In a message dated 4/4/99 2:00:09 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
ian@achrn.demon.co.uk writes:

<< Wear a helmet to walk along the street, do you? Sleep in a helmet? No? Then
don’t spout drivel like “should be protected at all times” when you clearly
don’t mean it. You may choose that unicycling presents a high-enough risk to
justify wearing a helmet, but don’t try and dress it up in such moralistic
cliches that don’t stand even cursory examination. >>

Chill out Ian. Just because you don’t agree with someone’s post doesn’t mean you
have to personally slam them. There are plenty of chat rooms where you can
belittle people if that makes you feel better.

-Mike UniChef@aol.com http://members.aol.com/UniChef/unichef.html (with helmet)

RE: Helmet Issue

> Sounds like unnecessary peer pressure to me. I think wearing a helmet while
> riding a unicycle with a wheel diameter smaller than 30" is silly. Would you

I don’t see what wheel size has to do with falling down. Sheer speed is not the
issue in regard to potential head injury. A number of people voiced concerns
last summer at NUC due to a large concrete curb at the edge of the track. A 20"
wheel riding on the Stevens Trail
(http://shay.ecn.purdue.edu/~bymaster/muni/steven.html), for instance, can send
you down the same cliff that a larger wheel could.

> And in terms of general public perceptions, wearing a helmet while unicycling
> does more harm than good. It perpetuates the image of the sport being more
> dangerous than it actually is.

I used to feel the same way but now I have to disagree. By noticing the
reactions of people to unicycling over the years, it’s become obvious to me that
there is nothing we can possibly do to make it look more dangerous than it
already does to non-riders. They think we’re about to die no matter what.
Therefore by putting a helmet on, at least in a situation like racing, it
indicates that we may be doing something dangerous, but at least we’ve given it
some thought.

And as another writer mentioned earlier, yes, helmets are probably most
important for children, and that’s a decision responsibility that should be made
by the parents.

Stay on top,

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

RE: Helmet Issue

> No one would ride with me if I wasn’t wearing one, and I would be regarded as
> a foolish idiot.

Where Kris rides, he would be a foolish idiot if he didn’t wear one.
Those guys like to ride on stuff that mountain goats think is too technical
to walk on.

This reminds me of Canada’s attitude toward litter. You just don’t do it!

But both the litter and the driving while impaird analogies are different from
helmets. littering makes the environment ugly for everyone, and driving while
impaired makes you potentially fatal to others. Wearing a helmet is just for
you, depending on your country’s health care system…

Stay on top,

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

Re: Helmet Issue

I’m probably going to get slammed, but in all my years of riding I’ve never
worn a helmet except for racing or where I plan to do reckless, dangerous
stunts (ie mountain unicycling). Learning could fall under “dangerous” for some
people. Unicycling is not at all like bicycling in that when one falls, one is
not trapped under the frame, thus it’s easy to land on one’s own feet. Some may
view a person riding a uni w/all this safety equipment on as “unicycling must
be dangerous or they’re being safe”. I guess where you live, I would be
considered a foolish idiot, but then I don’t care what other people think. The
one time I was at a uni meet & someone injured their head it was because they
were goofing off, fell and landed on someone else’s uni pedal. I also heard of
another incident of a big wheel rider who rode into a steel pole, cracked his
head open & had to have it stapled, but that was because his view was
obstructed from wearing a baseball cap. Accidents do happen & people need think
& take responsibility for their actions but IMO recreational unicycling poses
almost as much risk as walking (I fall more when I walk) & I generally don’t
wear a helmut walking.

Unicycle Lady http://members.aol.com/unilady/

>Hi,
>
>One other somewhat indirect reason for wearing a helmet:
>
>Around where I live, not wearing a helmet while bicycling (or unicycling for
>me) is about as respected as impaired driving. No one would ride with me if I
>wasn’t wearing one, and I would be regarded as a foolish idiot.
>
>-Kris.

Re: Helmet Issue

When riding around the neighborhood I wear a helmet for two reasons:

First, it sets an example for kids who don’t always wear their bike helmets.

Second, I don’t trust cars coming around curves. One driver was so fascinated
by the site of a unicycle that he forgot to turn. He came straight at me
before suddenly realizing his mistake. That was even more exciting than riding
a unicycle!

Dave Matthews goatlover@aol.com

RE: Helmet Issue

> skills. Would not having the kids wear helmets when biking or unicycling be
> child abuse?

This probably depends on local laws. Many communities and states across the
country now have helmet laws for kids, and if you violate that it’s probably a
lot worse than in an area with no such laws.

But I would think it’s a little easier for the Panther Pride folks, because all
the kids wear helmets as a matter of course, so it should be easier for them to
wear one when outside of school without feeling uncomfortable.

jf

Re: Helmet Issue

I’m teaching my niece to ride and I didn’t think anything of her just getting up
on my 20" just to give it a try. Then her father came to pick her up. She will
be wearing a helmet in the future! I don’t see any reason to fight it. Safety
gear is there to protect the rider. It being worn won’t deminish the one wheel’d
experience!

Unicyclers <unicyclers@aol.com> wrote in article
<19990401013625.15603.00000701@ng-ba1.aol.com>…
> Although I don’t ride, I am a mother of two riders under the age of 15.
> Helmets are not an issue for us. It works one way, the unicycle doesn’t
move
> without the helmet on the head. Our team uses helmets for ALL riding
purposes
> not just track or Muni. It doesn’t hamper their ability to perform or
> function. As for the shin gards, I may consider them for the days I help at
practice!
> Barb Kowalski

Re: Helmet Issue

A mind is important. It should be protected at all times. Things happen faster
than you realize when on one wheel. Barb

Re: Helmet Issue

Hi,

One other somewhat indirect reason for wearing a helmet:

Around where I live, not wearing a helmet while bicycling (or unicycling for me)
is about as respected as impaired driving. No one would ride with me if I wasn’t
wearing one, and I would be regarded as a foolish idiot.

-Kris.

At 11:28 PM 4/4/99 EDT, you wrote:
>In a message dated 4/4/99 2:00:09 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
>ian@achrn.demon.co.uk writes:
>
><< Wear a helmet to walk along the street, do you? Sleep in a helmet? No? Then
>don’t spout drivel like “should be protected at all times” when you clearly
>don’t mean it. You may choose that unicycling presents a high-enough risk to
>justify wearing a helmet, but don’t try and dress it up in such moralistic
>cliches that don’t stand even cursory examination. >>
>
>Chill out Ian. Just because you don’t agree with someone’s post doesn’t
mean
>you have to personally slam them. There are plenty of chat rooms where you can
>belittle people if that makes you feel better.
>
>-Mike UniChef@aol.com http://members.aol.com/UniChef/unichef.html (with helmet)
>
>
>


Kris Holm, B.Sc. Geologist, Forestry Group, EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd.
Suite 550, Sun Life Plaza, 1100 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6E 4A6
Tel:(604) 685-0275 Fax:(604) 684-6241 Email: kholm@eba.ca

Re: Helmet Issue

In article <8b8b3873.243987c1@aol.com>, UniChef@aol.com wrote:
>In a message dated 4/4/99 2:00:09 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
>ian@achrn.demon.co.uk writes:
>
><< Wear a helmet to walk along the street, do you? Sleep in a helmet? No? Then
>don’t spout drivel like “should be protected at all times” when you clearly
>don’t mean it. You may choose that unicycling presents a high-enough risk to
>justify wearing a helmet, but don’t try and dress it up in such moralistic
>cliches that don’t stand even cursory examination. >>
>
>Chill out Ian. Just because you don’t agree with someone’s post doesn’t mean
>you have to personally slam them. There are plenty of chat rooms where you can
>belittle people if that makes you feel better.

I’m not looking to belittle anyone. I’m pointing out what self-evident rubbish
the statement ‘should be protected at all times’ is. I don’t care if someone
decides that unicycling is dangerous enough to wear a helmet or not, I do care
when they spout righteous rubbish and hide behind it to justify their position.
It’s such unthinking glib comments that have lumbered people with damaging
compulsory helmet laws in many countries, and I don’t like seeing such
pernicious laws spread.

regards, Ian SMith

|\ /| Opinions expressed in this post are my own, and do
|o o| not reflect the views of Amos, my mbu puffer fish.
|/ | (His view is that small snails are very tasty.)
Amos now on the web at http://www.achrn.demon.co.uk/amos.html

Re: Helmet Issue

I guess with the helmet issue, as a parent, I would rather have the kids wear
their helmets. In the case of an mishap I don’t want to be in the position of
wishing I could turn back time to prevent a head injury. In this day and age
parents are so worried about how protective services views our parenting
skills. Would not having the kids wear helmets when biking or unicycling be
child abuse? The helmet wearing is just a habit, a reflex. One may look at
things differently after practicing in a gym with almost 70 kids. I don’t think
having the kids wear helmets makes them more reckless nor does it give them
false security. This is my opinion. I won’t make you wear your helmet should
you come cycle at my house.

Re: Helmet Issue

In article <19990402233203.00866.00001514@ng136.aol.com>, Unicyclers wrote:

>A mind is important. It should be protected at all times.

Wear a helmet to walk along the street, do you? Sleep in a helmet? No? Then
don’t spout drivel like “should be protected at all times” when you clearly
don’t mean it. You may choose that unicycling presents a high-enough risk to
justify wearing a helmet, but don’t try and dress it up in such moralistic
cliches that don’t stand even cursory examination.

The helmet debate is on-going in the bicycle world. Personally, I’m not in
favour of helmets being made obligatory, but I do wear one on a bike.

Some intersting thoughts:

When an Australian state made helmets compulsory, the number of head-injuries
reduced. The number of cylist-miles reduced more. That is, the rate of head
injuries among cyclists increased.

A passenger in a car is more likely to suffer head-injuries than a cyclist.
No-one proposes compulsory helmets for car drivers/passengers (that I know of).

A good statistical reason for wearing a helmet is that insurance payouts too
helmetted riders aree higher than unhelmeted. This is put down to perceived
contributory negligence, and applies even in cases where a helmet would have
done no good whatsoever. This is clearly nonsense (“no, Judge, I should not be
jailed, on the grounds of contributory negligence - had he been wearing
body-armour the knife woiuld not have penetrated his lungs.”) Although this
applies to bicycles on the road, it is probably not relevant to unicycling.

I don’t wear a helmet to unicycle, despite having hit my head on concrete once
(learning to ride backwards I went backwards and the unicycle didn’t). I
didn’t die.

regards, Ian SMith

|\ /| Opinions expressed in this post are my own, and do
|o o| not reflect the views of Amos, my mbu puffer fish.
|/ | (His view is that small snails are very tasty.)
Amos now on the web at http://www.achrn.demon.co.uk/amos.html

Re: Helmet Issue

Sounds like unnecessary peer pressure to me. I think wearing a helmet while
riding a unicycle with a wheel diameter smaller than 30" is silly. Would you
wear a helmet while walking or running?

And in terms of general public perceptions, wearing a helmet while unicycling
does more harm than good. It perpetuates the image of the sport being more
dangerous than it actually is.

Re: Helmet Issue

I was a bit unclear: Just for casual riding around I don’t usually wear a helmet
or any other safety gear; I was more referring to MUni and practicing tricks
like gliding.

Also, regarding appearing dangerous: do you think bicycling is regarded as more
dangerous when people wear helmets? I highly doubt it.

-Kris.

At 06:15 PM 4/5/99 GMT, you wrote:
>Sounds like unnecessary peer pressure to me. I think wearing a helmet while
>riding a unicycle with a wheel diameter smaller than 30" is silly. Would you
>wear a helmet while walking or running?
>
>And in terms of general public perceptions, wearing a helmet while unicycling
>does more harm than good. It perpetuates the image of the sport being more
>dangerous than it actually is.
>
>


Kris Holm, B.Sc. Geologist, Forestry Group, EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd.
Suite 550, Sun Life Plaza, 1100 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6E 4A6
Tel:(604) 685-0275 Fax:(604) 684-6241 Email: kholm@eba.ca

Re: Mountain View

Hi,

I am a french unicycler from Quebec city and I will be at Mountain View,
California ( 40 miles south of San Francisco ) from April the 15th to April the
25th. 10 days. With my 9 years old daughter. It would be great to meet with some
unicyclers over there. Are there some who would unicycle with my daughter and I.
Reply soon.

J.-P. Ferland Dentist from Quebec city

Kris Holm a =E9crit:
> =

> Hi,
> =

> One other somewhat indirect reason for wearing a helmet:
> =

> Around where I live, not wearing a helmet while bicycling (or unicyclin=
g
> for me) is about as respected as impaired driving. No one would ride wi=
th
> me if I wasn’t wearing one, and I would be regarded as a foolish idiot.=

> =

> -Kris.
> =

> At 11:28 PM 4/4/99 EDT, you wrote:
> >In a message dated 4/4/99 2:00:09 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
> >ian@achrn.demon.co.uk writes:
> >
> ><< Wear a helmet to walk along the street, do you? Sleep in a helmet?=
No?
> > Then don’t spout drivel like “should be protected at all times” whe=
n you
> > clearly don’t mean it. You may choose that unicycling presents a high-enough
> > risk to justify wearing a helmet, but don’t try and dress=
it
> > up in such moralistic cliches that don’t stand even cursory examinati=
on. >>
> >
> >Chill out Ian. Just because you don’t agree with someone’s post doesn=
't
> mean
> >you have to personally slam them. There are plenty of chat rooms wher=
e you
> >can belittle people if that makes you feel better.
> >
> >-Mike UniChef@aol.com http://members.aol.com/UniChef/unichef.html (with
> >helmet)
> >
> >
> >
> _______________________________________________________
> =

> Kris Holm, B.Sc. Geologist, Forestry Group, EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd.
> Suite 550, Sun Life Plaza, 1100 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6E 4A=
6
> Tel604) 685-0275 Fax604) 684-6241 Email: kholm@eba.ca

Re: Helmet Issue

Kris’s post makes perfect sense IF you’ve seen where he rides. If you haven’t
maybe it sounds like peer pressure. Actually, wearing a helmet on that terrain
just reduces the insanity a small amount! You also need the body armor he
described in a previous post.

For myself, I nearly always wear gloves, always wear a helmet on Muni rides, and
sometimes wear kneepads (but don’t like them). Others wear no protective gear
ever, and I guess some people wear helmets in the car. I once saw two kids, age
4 and 6 wearing helmets while riding tricycles on very soft lawn at 2mph.

—Nathan

Kris Holm wrote in message
<3..3.32.19990405090112.006cdd34@199.185.15.66>…
>Hi,
>
>One other somewhat indirect reason for wearing a helmet:
>
>Around where I live, not wearing a helmet while bicycling (or unicycling for
>me) is about as respected as impaired driving. No one would ride with me if I
>wasn’t wearing one, and I would be regarded as a foolish idiot.
>
>-Kris.
>
>At 11:28 PM 4/4/99 EDT, you wrote:
>>In a message dated 4/4/99 2:00:09 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
>>ian@achrn.demon.co.uk writes:
>>
>><< Wear a helmet to walk along the street, do you? Sleep in a helmet?
No?
>> Then don’t spout drivel like “should be protected at all times” when
you
>> clearly don’t mean it. You may choose that unicycling presents a high-enough
>> risk to justify wearing a helmet, but don’t try and dress it up in such
>> moralistic cliches that don’t stand even cursory examination.
>>
>>
>>Chill out Ian. Just because you don’t agree with someone’s post doesn’t
>mean
>>you have to personally slam them. There are plenty of chat rooms where
you
>>can belittle people if that makes you feel better.
>>
>>-Mike UniChef@aol.com http://members.aol.com/UniChef/unichef.html
>>(with helmet)
>>
>>
>>
>_______________________________________________________
>
>Kris Holm, B.Sc. Geologist, Forestry Group, EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd.
>Suite 550, Sun Life Plaza, 1100 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6E 4A6
>Tel604) 685-0275 Fax604) 684-6241 Email: kholm@eba.ca
>

Re: Helmet Issue

The wearing of helmets is required for our Team members. This is something my
kids also practice on their own. Some decisions should not be left up to
children. Yes, they sometimes wear them in the car! Barb K.