Gymnasium Flooring and Unicycling

Our unicycle club is going so well that we are growing beyond the bounds of the small elementary school gym we are presently using. My church is presently (and conveniently) building a new gymnasium-type facility with twice the room and I have put in a facility use application in hopes of moving our club to the new facility when it is finished. Problem is, the flooring system being installed is called Sport Court and is comprised of some sort of interlocking 10" plastic squares all riding on a thin layer of rubber and the Leadership Team at church is being advised by the company (I think) that no wheeled devices should be used on the floor. I understand that the flooring system is widely used in Gus Macker basketball tourneys. I believe that the company’s intended direction was meant for hard wheels like those found on roller blades, skateboards, etc. There has to be a difference in the pressure exerted by hard wheels vs. pneumatic tired devices. I wonder how much different the action of pneumatic tires on the floor would be from shoes and/or basketballs. I may be invited in to “sell” the Leadership Team on our use of the facility. Any of your thoughts toward mounting a presentation would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Bruce

> flooring system being installed is called Sport Court and is
> comprised of some sort of interlocking 10" plastic squares all riding
> on a thin layer of rubber and the Leadership Team at church is being
> advised by the company (I think) that no wheeled devices should be
> used on the floor.

This sounds like the flooring manufacturer covering themselves against
liability or undue wear. Similar to how the makers of cranes with 70-ton
lifting capacity come with disclaimers about how they were not designed
for bungee jumping. It has nothing to do with the actual crane…

I haven’t experienced this type of flooring. But anything that holds up to
basketball should be just fine under the stresses of unicycling. The only
differences I can think of are the issue of marks from tires, or possible
cracks from pedals or other hard things being dropped.

As far as tire marks, you are in the same position as any gym. If you
have a good “track” record in your current gym, it should serve as
good evidence.

As far as cracks, a normal gym floor gets subjected to tables stands,
various forms of equipment such as gymnastic apparatus, volleyball net
stands, and any number of things that could fall or be dropped on it. If
it cracks every time this happens, it’s not a good floor.

That puts you back to the age-old marking issue only. Riding (or dropping)
unicycles does not place any greater torsion/traction forces on a floor
than basketball, In fact I would put basketball way ahead in terms of
those stresses. The main issue for you is that this gym will be new, and
people tend to be paranoid about new gym floors.

Good luck, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“You’re not supposed to wash your Roach armor” - Nathan Hoover, bragging
about his safety equipment cleaning methods

Sports court

I’m no technical authority on Sports court, and have only experienced it through playing Roller Hockey, where it is a widely recognised surface. It strikes me that as John Foss has said, the manufacturer is merely covering themselves, and that if the surface is made for the use of hard wheels, and as i have found, inline skate wheels, it should be more than strong enough for use with pneumatic wheels which spread the weight over a greater area, thus decreasing the pressure exerted. Ontop of this, as sports court is used elsewhere for rollerhockey, the surface must surely be able to stand up to the even greater pressures of other objects eg. a players stick, especially during a slap shot.
Hope this helps if u need 2 do a presentation or anything

Ando

Read their web site and find out the model of Sport Court flooring your church is purchasing. Most of the flooring types have a 10 year limited warranty. A couple of models can be used with roller hockey.

With a load bearing capacity not to exceed 15,000 pounds per 9.9"x9.9" tile, I’m sure a unicyclist should be Ok. Hell, the whole Redford Township uni club could trackstand on one tile and be Ok.

A single unicyclist, even when jumping from a 6’ height should not be able to exceed 15,000 lbs/tile. Maybe the physicists can answer with a more accurate calculation? Let me try. A 9.9"x9.9" tile is about 98 square inches to support 15,000 lbs, or 153 lb per square inch. If one assumes an average uni’s “footprint” is 2 square inches, that’s 306 lbs. So no unicyclists are allowed into the gym that exceed 286 lbs with a 20 lb uni. Is this right?

Lots of product documentation is available on their web site and should be used to support you case for uni riding.

As a side note, rubber or plastic pedals should be used in the gym. Metal pedals might make your church admin people a little nervous. Your tires may leave scuff marks on the gym walls, but no more than basketball shoes.

Don_TaiATyahooDOTcoDOTuk, Toronto, Canada

yoopers <forum.member@unicyclist.com> writes:

>the flooring system being installed is called Sport Court and is
>comprised of some sort of interlocking 10" plastic squares all riding on
>a thin layer of rubber and the Leadership Team at church is being
>advised by the company (I think) that no wheeled devices should be used
>on the floor.

Hey Bruce, If it makes any difference, this is the floor system that I
brought to your church and set up in the auditorium for my performance.
I’ve been using Sport Court/Flight Deck surfaces for 10 years. When it
comes to gymnasium riding it is my favorite surface to ride on. I believe
it is safer for unicycles than the typical tile, cement or wood floor. All
of these surfaces can collect dust and dirt that will make them very
slippery for unicycling unless constantly swept. The Sport Court and
Flight Deck surfaces are porous and acctually grip the rubber of a uni
tire quite nicely. Plus, I still haven’t found a way to damage my floor
with a unicycle. If you or the leadership team of your church has any
questions, let me know.

dustin kelm Unicycling Productions www.dustin.kelm.com www.unicycle.com
www.passageway.org/popculture/dustinkelm.asp

isa40:29-31

> As a side note, rubber or plastic pedals should be used in the gym.
> Metal pedals might make your church admin people a little nervous. Your
> tires may leave scuff marks on the gym walls, but no more than
> basketball shoes.

Good advice from Don. I would add non-marking tires, and no metal in the
part of the seat that touches the floor. This would be a favor to owners
of Taiwanese, metal-bumper seats…

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com www.unicycling.com

“You’re not supposed to wash your Roach armor” - Nathan Hoover, bragging
about his safety equipment cleaning methods