Going Up In the World

Newbie Greetings:

I have been riding my CyclePro 24 around the neighborhood for about 10 months now. I can freemount fairly reliably and don’t tend to fall much anymore on my daily 3-5 mile rides. I haven’t bothered to learn much in the way of tricks or alternate mounts. I use my wheel as a fun way to exercise, primarily.

To expand my horizons, I recently bought a Coker 36. I find it’s just about as easy to ride as my 24, plus a whole lot faster. Trouble is I have yet to find success in mounting the darn thing without hanging onto something.

Can someone suggest a recipe to follow so I can learn to free-mount the Coker?

Thanks,
Guy

Recipe: practice, practice, practice…

It took me a while to get this and I still don’t get it every time. I
mostly use the rock back mount on other wheels but the Coker is so heavy
that this is difficult to control.

So I need to mount in such a way that the wheel is rolling forward, or
poised to do so. The most effective aid to this is to mount where the
ground is sloped downwards a little. This way I get a little help from
Isaac Newton.

The next thing is to throw my weight forward rather than straight up as in
the rock back mount. When you frighten scales, as I do, you need to be
careful where you throw your weight :slight_smile:

I’m getting better as time goes by and usually succeed even on flat ground
these days.

Arnold the Aardvark

I agree with the technique presented by Arnold the Aardvark and the stress on practice. When there is nothing to hold onto, a curb behind the wheel can allow you to step on the back pedal without rolling the Coker backwards. You also start from a height that is a few inches above the ground. Small rocks and other debris may also work for you.

I practiced free-mounting my Coker for about an hour one day to ensure that I would be less likely to embarrass myself on long rides when I had to free-mount. I did this to learn to control the side to side wobble I experienced for several meters before getting up enough speed to stabilize. I settled on a compromise between weight applied to the back pedal and a huge leap upwards. The forward leap approach was a little less comfortable for me.

Good luck. Mount that stallion!

Thanks, guys.

I had pretty much come to the same conclusions, but hoped that somebody more experienced could reveal a Secret Trick to avoid pesky work. No such luck. Darn.

I feel like I can almost get it with the Air Jordan leap upwards technique, but it’s right at my limit and very hard to control once I get up there. Oh well, there’s plenty of telephone poles and stop signs…

Guy

I got my coker like 8 months ago, and at first freemounting was impossible. I stuck to the rolling mount method, and now it works wonderfully. Not to toot my own horn, but since the end of august, I have successfully mounted every time. It became as easy as mounting my 20"
-David Kaplan

I’ve got no problems mounting my Coker but…

I cannot idle at all. Is this as difficult as it feels to me? I can idle all day on my 20" and 24" but not at all on the Coker.

-mg

David,

Could you do a rolling mount on your 20" already? I am also (very loosely
yet) considering to buy a Coker. But I am quite weak at mounting, the only
mount I can do on my 24" is the standard mount and not even every time I
must admit. For me, this is one reason not to go for a Coker yet.

Klaas Bil

On Sat, 13 Oct 2001 02:15:10 +0000 (UTC), UniDak
<forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote:

>I got my coker like 8 months ago, and at first freemounting was
>impossible. I stuck to the rolling mount method, and now it works
>wonderfully. Not to toot my own horn, but since the end of august, I have
>successfully mounted every time. It became as easy as mounting my 20"
>-David Kaplan
>
>
>
>
>–
>UniDak Posted via the Unicyclist Community - http://unicyclist.com/forums


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “Dick Cheney, terrorist, El Shifa (Sudan)”

Before I bought my Coker, had a rough concept of a rolling mount on my
20", but was very, very weak at it. Because the coker has a lot of
momentum, it makes the rolling mount actually a little easier. Once I had
the rolling mount down on the coker, it wasn’t long before I got it
successfully on the 20". (Mind you, I most certainly learned it first, and
best on the coker.)

The only way to learn to ride and mount a coker is to practice using a
coker. You won’t know what its intertia is like until you’ve tried to get
that wheel rolling. But, as soon as you have a grasp of how it works (an
object in motion will tend to remain in motion…) you will learn it. It’s
not more difficult than riding or mounting a 20", it’s just different.

As long as we’re talking about Cokers here, another bit of advice for
learning… if you’re willing… A while back, I’d reached the point where
I could freemount my coker most of the time. Then, I bent one of the
cranks (Word of caution – don’t borrow your Coker’s cranks to use on a
muni). The only spare set of cranks I had were 5" (Cokers come with 6"),
so I used those. It was a lot harder to mount, and turn sharply, and to a
degree, even slow down.

Well, after a little over a week (a little under 100 miles) I got a new
set of 6" cranks. I put them on, and immediately noticed one thing. I
could mount absolutely effortlessly. I even tried idling (something I’d
never really had any luck with before) and got in maybe a dozen or so
idles. Of course, after riding a few miles, I realized I missed having
those fast 5" cranks, and have been riding with them ever since.

So, what I’m saying is, to anyone who’s reasonably comfortable with the
factory 6" cranks on their coker, I recommend you give 5" a try. Either
they’ll improve some of the finer skill on 6" cranks, or you’ll decide
that you just really like 5" :slight_smile:

jl

> David,
>
> Could you do a rolling mount on your 20" already? I am also (very
> loosely yet) considering to buy a Coker. But I am quite weak at
> mounting, the only mount I can do on my 24" is the standard mount and
> not even every time I must admit. For me, this is one reason not to go
> for a Coker yet.
>
> Klaas Bil

Sent via the Unicyclist Community - http://Unicyclist.com

> I cannot idle at all. Is this as difficult as it feels to me? I can idle
> all day on my 20" and 24" but not at all on the Coker.

Yes, it is much more difficult. But definately worth learning if you want
to ride roads. Although priority number one for riding roads is to learn
to ride up and hold onto a traffic light, railing or signpost.

I found it helped to start learning this with a lot of top foot, rather
than just the bottom foot doing all the work as on a smaller unicycle.
This is also handy for doing twisty-turns in crowds or traffic, where
you twist from the top foot as it’s starting to push down to get a very
hard turn.

Joe

[QUOTE]
Originally posted by Klaas Bil
[B]David,

Could you do a rolling mount on your 20" already? I am also (very loosely
yet) considering to buy a Coker. But I am quite weak at mounting, the only
mount I can do on my 24" is the standard mount and not even every time I
must admit. For me, this is one reason not to go for a Coker yet.

Klaas Bil

I learned how to do a rolling mount on my 20" but never got really good at it, for the sole reason that there is really no need for it on a 20". To this day, I am more successful with the coker rolling mount than the 20" rolling mount… Odd huh?
-David Kaplan

> I learned how to do a rolling mount on my 20" but never got really good
> at it, for the sole reason that there is really no need for it on a 20".
> To this day, I am more successful with the coker rolling mount than the
> 20" rolling mount… Odd huh? -David Kaplan

think about what the wheel is doing, and how you are applying your weight
to it. You want the wheel rolling forward, but the first foot which lands
a pedal does so in direct oposition to the direction the wheel wants to
go. You have to train yourself not to apply weight to this foot. On a
coker, if the wheel’s already going forward, you can accidently apply a
little weight here in oposition to that forward motion without it being a
big deal. On a 20" wheel, it takes little effort to bring the wheel to a
stop, or make it change direction entirely.

jl

Sent via the Unicyclist Community - http://Unicyclist.com

Instead of thinking of it as idling as you do on a smaller unicycle. Just
ride backwards and forwards slowly and gently. If you go to shorter cranks
it’s harder, but with the standard 6" cranks, it’s very doable. If you are
waiting for a light someplace where you can’t take up much space, slow,
infrequent little hops are probably better.

—Nathan

“mgrant” <forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:9qara3$f5q$1@laurel.tc.umn.edu
> I’ve got no problems mounting my Coker but…
>
> I cannot idle at all. Is this as difficult as it feels to me? I can idle
> all day on my 20" and 24" but not at all on the Coker.
>
> -mg

Thanks for your input everyone. This has been helpful. I’ve ridden the Coker as far as three miles, but still need the stop sign to get on…

If I may impose, could anyone walk me through a rolling mount, or perhaps indicate an URL with a description and/or video clip demonstration?

Thanks again all
:slight_smile: