Go, Dog. Go!

I read “Go, Dog. Go!” to my daughter tonight for her bedtime story. There is a
dog on page 7 riding a giraffe unicycle that does not have a seat or any frame
extension above the crank bracket. I guess you might call this contraption an
“ultimate giraffe”.

Then I started wondering if anyone has ever tried making and riding such a
thing. You’d obviously need assistance in mounting it, but would it be possible
to ride???

-Rick

RE: Go, Dog. Go!

> might call this contraption an “ultimate giraffe”.
>
> Then I started wondering if anyone has ever tried making and riding such a
> thing. You’d obviously need assistance in mounting it, but would it be
> possible to ride???

I remember having this arguement many years ago with Jack Halpern and JeanPaul
Jenack (not with the Seuss book). Jack has always contended that it should be
possible, and not to tell people things aren’t. We said go ahead and build one,
and prove us wrong! (sometimes telling people something is impossible is a great
motivator)

I always thought he might, because from the guy who built and rode the first two
wheeler (unicycle with reverse drive upper wheel:
http://www.unicycling.com/unifoss/garage/multi.htm), one and a half wheeler, and
no-wheeler, it seemed a logical progression.

I’m still waiting hopefully.

As far as how hard to do it, I’d practice wheel walking on an ultimate wheel
with 1.75 tire before trying the giraffe…

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone (reply to jfoss@unicycling.com)
http://www.unicycling.com

Still searching for the MUni thieves (hopefully looking a little harder than
O.J.'s search for ‘the killer’)

RE: Go, Dog. Go!

> You know, I actusally built one of these contraption, and tried to ride the
> damn thing. I will let you imagine how frustrating my attempts were.

Woohoo! I already imagined it, way back when we had the arguements :slight_smile:

> Warning: make sure you have 47 years to spare…

47 represents the number of years of bad luck you get if you’re riding a giraffe
with no seat and you sit down on the post too hard…

Stay on top (carefully!), jf

RE: Go, Dog. Go!

> Yeah, looks tough! There’s another Seuss-style book we got from a Seuss book
> club called “Bears on Wheels” by Stan and Jan Berenstain. It’s a counting book
> to help teach kids, but the story revolves around a unicycling bear.

Bears on Wheels is a great book to explain why unicycles are cool. The
simplicity, reliability, and convenience of one wheel are so simply stated. The
authors probably did not realize at the time what a strong message they were
sending about unicycles.

In fact, come to think of it, I probably had that book as a child. Could it (and
other Seuss-inspired books with unicycles) have contributed to my desire to ride
a unicycle from an early age? It’s hard to say.

I think everyone who has not seen this book (or not recently) should check one
out at their local children’s library or discount department store. It only
takes about 4 minutes to read if you’re an adult, and you will walk away happy
and proud to be a unicyclist!

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone (reply to jfoss@unicycling.com)
http://www.unicycling.com

Re: Go, Dog. Go!

Greetings

In message “RE: Go, Dog. Go!”, John Foss wrote…
>> might call this contraption an “ultimate giraffe”.
>>
>> Then I started wondering if anyone has ever tried making and riding such a
>> thing. You’d obviously need assistance in mounting it, but would it be
>> possible to ride???
>
>I remember having this arguement many years ago with Jack Halpern and JeanPaul
>Jenack (not with the Seuss book). Jack has always contended that it should be
>possible, and not to tell people things aren’t. We said go ahead and build
>one, and prove us wrong! (sometimes telling people something is impossible is
>a great motivator)

You know, I actusally built one of these contraption, and tried to ride the
damn thing. I will let you imagine how frustrating my attempts were. My gut
feeling is that it CAN be done and I am waiting for someone to do it. I
suggest you strat by using smaller wheel and by removing the saddle form an
ordinnary giraffe. The seatpost will be of help. I f you can do that, then cut
off the seatpost.

Warning: make sure you have 47 years to spare…

>I always thought he might, because from the guy who built and rode the first
>two wheeler (unicycle with reverse drive upper wheel:
>http://www.unicycling.com/unifoss/garage/multi.htm), one and a half wheeler,
>and no-wheeler, it seemed a logical progression.
>
>I’m still waiting hopefully.
>
>As far as how hard to do it, I’d practice wheel walking on an ultimate wheel
>with 1.75 tire before trying the giraffe…
>
>Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone (reply to jfoss@unicycling.com)
>http://www.unicycling.com
>
>Still searching for the MUni thieves (hopefully looking a little harder than
>O.J.'s search for ‘the killer’)
>
>

Regards, Jack Halpern CJK Dictionary Publishing Society, http://www.kanji.org
Voice: +81-48-481-3103 Fax: +81-48-479-1323

Re: Go, Dog. Go!

On Tue, 15 Feb 2000, Rick Bissell wrote:
>I read “Go, Dog. Go!” to my daughter tonight for her bedtime story. There is a
>dog on page 7 riding a giraffe unicycle that does not have a seat or any frame
>extension above the crank bracket. I guess you might call this contraption an
>“ultimate giraffe”.

Yeah, looks tough! There’s another Seuss-style book we got from a Seuss book
club called “Bears on Wheels” by Stan and Jan Berenstain. It’s a counting book
to help teach kids, but the story revolves around a unicycling bear.

Greg