Giraffe Questions, lots of them.

I’m now sincerely considering getting a giraffe unicycle.

I’m not worthy of a DM.
Also, 4.99 UKP per inch is an awful lot of money for a 5 foot unicycle, even
if it will outlast me and stop an express train.
The DM 6 footer would be even nicer but I don’t feel I can justify spending
330 UKP.
And I don’t want to wait 4 months for it.

Here in England, I’m left with rather few alternatives.

The most sensible option seems to be the 175 UKP Nimbus 5’ Giraffe. (under 3
quid per inch, bargain.)
Compared to the DM (not fair, I know) the Nimbus Giraffe looks a bit puny.
I’ve heard horror stories about giraffe frames being bent when ungraceful
dismounts send them clattering to the ground. I’ve also heard that hopping
on some giraffes causes similar distortions.

Is a Nimbus 5’ Giraffe going to stand up to (ab)use by a 12st. 6’3" heffer
such as myself?

Does anybody here own one of these?

What’s it like generally? How does it compare with other giraffes?

Does it have asynchronous transmission? Would it be difficult to fit if it
doesn’t?

Are the DMs’ dual chains purely aesthetic or do they serve a purpose (other
than emergency redunancy :-)?

How far is it from the ground up to the top axle of a Nimbus 5’ Giraffe? (If
it’s 3 feet or more, by the time I get a suitably sized
seatpost onto it, I’ll be sitting 6 feet up.)

What are my other options as far as finding a relatively inexpensive
giraffe? Import? eBay?

What else should I be looking for in a giraffe?

Any and all help is greatly appreciated.

Andrew
0xADF

Re: Giraffe Questions, lots of them.

“Andrew Feldhaus” <Reply@thread.pls> wrote in message
news:a6ldi3$k7e$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk

> Are the DMs’ dual chains purely aesthetic or do they serve a purpose
(other
> than emergency redunancy :-)?
>
The two chainrings are offset by half a tooth, this means that when you
change the direction you pedal you get a lot less ?backlash? than a normal
chain drive. (the little chain skip caused by the chainring tooth moving
from one end of the hole in the chain to the other).

This makes DM giraffes much easier to idle with and generally more like a
direct drive unicycle.

I think this might be what asynchronous transmission means, so retrofitting
it would mean two chains. Which would mean a new crank + chainring, which
would be a wrong side drive crank, so somewhat obscure, probably a new
matching right crank and a new hub, not sure if the DM hubs are standard
bike flip-flop hubs with two fixed gears mounted or something more
complicated.

Asynchronous transmission might also mean the thing about the chainring
having one less tooth than the gear at the wheel, which means that things
wear more evenly as you’re not always idling in the same place on the tyre /
wheel / gear.

Joe

Re: Giraffe Questions, lots of them.

eBay routinely has three or four Savage 5 and 6 footers, usually US$129 to US$139. Can’t speak for the quality, I’ve never seen one.

Re: Giraffe Questions, lots of them.

On Tue, 12 Mar 2002 17:49:11 GMT, “Joe Marshall”
<news@joemarshall.org.uk> wrote:

>The two chainrings are offset by half a tooth, this means that when you
>change the direction you pedal you get a lot less ?backlash? than a normal
>chain drive. (the little chain skip caused by the chainring tooth moving
>from one end of the hole in the chain to the other).
>
>This makes DM giraffes much easier to idle with and generally more like a
>direct drive unicycle.

I think I am missing something here. I don’t know exactly how the DM
system works but if I understand correctly, each of the chains can
still move over its own toothwheels by a conventional amount. The
drives are just parallel, so why whould the backlash be different?

Klaas Bil

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked automagically from a database:”
“edition, diwn, STEP”

Re: Giraffe Questions, lots of them.

klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl (Klaas Bil) wrote in
news:3c8e79f6.2652615@newszilla.xs4all.nl:

> On Tue, 12 Mar 2002 17:49:11 GMT, “Joe Marshall”
> <news@joemarshall.org.uk> wrote:
>
>>The two chainrings are offset by half a tooth, this means that when
>>you change the direction you pedal you get a lot less ?backlash? than
>>a normal chain drive. (the little chain skip caused by the chainring
>>tooth moving from one end of the hole in the chain to the other).
>>
>>This makes DM giraffes much easier to idle with and generally more
>>like a direct drive unicycle.
>
> I think I am missing something here. I don’t know exactly how the DM
> system works but if I understand correctly, each of the chains can
> still move over its own toothwheels by a conventional amount. The
> drives are just parallel, so why whould the backlash be different?
>
> Klaas Bil

The right-side chain is a half-tooth ahead of the left-side chain.
When the pedals are moved forward, the teeth of the sprocket on the right
side catch the chain links on the forward edge of their holes. Since the
right side can’t go any further and is connected to the left side, the left
side never gets to hit the forward edge of the hole. The left wheel
sprocket has to pull the chain as it turns, thus keeping the teeth on the
left crank sprocket towards the rear of the holes in the chain links.

I’ve never seen it in person, so I don’t know for sure, but that’s how I
picture it working.

John

Re: Giraffe Questions, lots of them.

On Wed, 13 Mar 2002 05:24:17 GMT, Johnny B
<centromachetestakethisout@takethisoutyahoo.com> wrote:

Thanks John. IIUC, one chain is always on one side of the slack (if
that wording makes sense), the other chain is always on the other side
of its slack. Makes one still wonder why the holes in the chain are so
much larger than the teeth in the first place but that probably has a
good reason, maybe it’s connected to the tooth rotating on the
sprocket having to catch up with a hole that moves in a linear
fashion.

Klaas Bil

>The right-side chain is a half-tooth ahead of the left-side chain.
>When the pedals are moved forward, the teeth of the sprocket on the right
>side catch the chain links on the forward edge of their holes. Since the
>right side can’t go any further and is connected to the left side, the left
>side never gets to hit the forward edge of the hole. The left wheel
>sprocket has to pull the chain as it turns, thus keeping the teeth on the
>left crank sprocket towards the rear of the holes in the chain links.
>
> I’ve never seen it in person, so I don’t know for sure, but that’s how I
>picture it working.
>
>John


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked automagically from a database:”
“JIC, virtual, penrep”

Re: Giraffe Questions, lots of them.

I would stay away from a Savage at that height. I have a three footer and
it is great for a beginner but it just didn’t hold together well. You
really want to spend a little extra $$$ if you plan on being that high. I
have a SemCycle and it is fantastic. enjoy-

“willfcc” <willfcc.1f64y@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:willfcc.1f64y@timelimit.unicyclist.com
>
> eBay routinely has three or four Savage 5 and 6 footers, usually US$129
> to US$139. Can’t speak for the quality, I’ve never seen one.
>
>
> –
> willfcc - Will Williamson
>
> Will Williamson
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> willfcc’s Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/664
> View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/16854
>
>