Getting ready for snow and ice

–part1_17.1f41707b.2935cbe6_boundary

Has anybody enhanced or modified a Gazz 3.0" (24") for winter (e.g.,
studs or chains)? I have a DM Vortex - the brake assembly leaves very
little clearance for extra junk, but I figured I’d ask anyway. I’m sure
that the Gazz will do well anyway in snow, but ice will be a problem. I
guess I could take the brake off for the winter in order to make room for
a chain or studs.

Thanks, Joe Merrill

–part1_17.1f41707b.2935cbe6_boundary Content-Type: text/html;
charset=“US-ASCII”

<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=2>Has anybody enhanced or
modified a Gazz 3.0" (24") for winter (e.g., studs or chains)? I
have a DM Vortex - the brake assembly leaves very little clearance for
extra junk, but I figured I’d ask anyway. I’m sure that the Gazz
will do well anyway in snow, but ice will be a problem. I guess I
could take the brake off for the winter in order to make room for a chain
or studs. <BR> <BR>Thanks, <BR>Joe Merrill</FONT></HTML>

–part1_17.1f41707b.2935cbe6_boundary–

<Nycjoe@aol.com> wrote in message
news:mailman.1006923989.16444.rsu@unicycling.org
> Has anybody enhanced or modified a Gazz 3.0" (24") for winter
> (e.g., studs
or
> chains)? I have a DM Vortex - the brake assembly leaves very little
> clearance for extra junk, but I figured I’d ask anyway. I’m sure
> that the Gazz will do well anyway in snow, but ice will be a
> problem. I guess I
could
> take the brake off for the winter in order to make room for a chain or
studs.

You could try a Nokian studded tyre, although I think the widest size the
24" ones come in is 1.75", so you might lose more than you gain.

Joe

Nycjoe@aol.com wrote:
>
> Has anybody enhanced or modified a Gazz 3.0" (24") for winter
> (e.g., studs or chains)? I have a DM Vortex - the brake assembly leaves
> very little clearance for extra junk, but I figured I’d ask anyway.
> I’m sure that the Gazz will do well anyway in snow, but ice will be
> a problem. I guess I could take the brake off for the winter in
> order to make room for a chain or studs.

Check out: http://www.universalcycles.com/tinokian.htm

Christopher

“Be Bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.” -Basil King (Anyone who
can give me more info on THIS Basil King please email
me.)

My small but growing site: http://home.earthlink.net/~crgrove/index.htm

If you are in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti, MI area check out my resume and if
you know of a company that fits me please let me know… Thanks!

Here’s some links to info on rolling your own studded bits of rubber:

Building your own studded tyre
http://www.geocities.com/Yosemite/Falls/1236/studs.html

Tires for IceBiking http://www.enteract.com/~icebike/Equipment/tires.htm

Muniac Manor http://www.muniac.com/emunitext.htm#studded

It all sounds like jolly good fun! Rather! Top Hole! Um…

-----Original Message----- From: c_r_grove@yahoo.com
["]mailto:c_r_grove@yahoo.com] Sent: 28 November 2001 14:19 To:
rec.sport.unicycling@kildrummy.co.uk; rsu@unicycling.org Subject: Re:
Getting ready for snow and ice Importance: Low

Nycjoe@aol.com wrote:
>>
>> Has anybody enhanced or modified a Gazz 3.0" (24") for winter
>> (e.g., studs or chains)? I have a DM Vortex - the brake assembly leaves
>> very little clearance for extra junk, but I figured I’d ask
>> anyway. I’m sure that the Gazz will do well anyway in snow, but
>> ice will be a problem. I guess I could take the brake off for the
>> winter in order to make room for a chain or studs.

Check out: http://www.universalcycles.com/tinokian.htm

Christopher

“Be Bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.” -Basil King (Anyone who
can give me more info on THIS Basil King please email
me.)

My small but growing site: http://home.earthlink.net/~crgrove/index.htm

If you are in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti, MI area check out my resume and if
you know of a company that fits me please let me know… Thanks!
_________________________________________________________________________-
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www.unicycling.org/mailman/listinfo/rsu

This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.

----__JNP_000_7f63.441f.440a

Joe, I haven’t done anything to a “winterize” a Gazz (of course, I haven’t
ever riden a Gazz). But in general, sheet ice is not a big deal so long as
you don’t make any sudden changes in speed or direction. Personally I find
the worst winter conditions to be the slush that accumulates at the side
of the road. Snow is easy, as long as it has not been packed down by
pedestrians and thawed and refrozed a few times. Then it is this solid
piece of uneven, pitted ice that results in painful UPDs.

I made a pair of chains last year, but I don’t like the extra weight. They
do help some, though.

Jeff

On Wed, 28 Nov 2001 00:11:02 EST Nycjoe@aol.com writes: Has anybody
enhanced or modified a Gazz 3.0" (24") for winter (e.g., studs or chains)?
I have a DM Vortex - the brake assembly leaves very little clearance for
extra junk, but I figured I’d ask anyway. I’m sure that the Gazz will do
well anyway in snow, but ice will be a problem. I guess I could take the
brake off for the winter in order to make room for a chain or studs.

Thanks, Joe Merrill ----__JNP_000_7f63.441f.440a Content-Type: text/html;
charset=us-ascii

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN”>
<HTML><HEAD> <META http-equiv=3DContent-Type content=3D"text/html;
charset=3Diso-8859-1"> <META content=3D"MSHTML 5.50.4611.1300"
name=3DGENERATOR></HEAD> <BODY>
<DIV>Joe,</DIV>
<DV>I haven’t done anything to a “winterize” a Gazz (of course, I
haven’t = ever=20 riden a Gazz). But in general, sheet ice is not a
big deal so long as you = don’t=20 make any sudden changes in speed
or direction. Personally I find the worst=
=20
winter conditions to be the slush that accumulates at the side of the
road.= Snow=20 is easy, as long as it has not been packed down by
pedestrians and thawed = and=20 refrozed a few times. Then it is this
solid piece of uneven, pitted ice = that=20 results in painful UPDs.</DIV>
<DVI> </DIV>
<DVII>I made a pair of chains last year, but I don’t like the extra
weight. = They=20 do help some, though.</DIV>
<DVIII> </DIV>
<DIX>Jeff</DIV>
<DX> </DIV>
<DXI>On Wed, 28 Nov 2001 00:11:02 EST <A=20
href=3D"mailto:Nycjoe@aol.com">Nycjoe@aol.com</A> writes:</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE dir=3Dltr=20 style=3D"PADDING-LEFT: 10px; MARGIN-LEFT:
10px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px = solid">
<DXII><FONT face=3Darial,helvetica><FONT size=3D2>Has anybody enhanced
or = modified=20 a Gazz 3.0" (24") for winter (e.g., studs or
chains)? I have a DM = Vortex=20

  • the brake assembly leaves very little clearance for extra junk, but
    I=20 figured I’d ask anyway. I’m sure that the Gazz will do well
    anyway = in=20 snow, but ice will be a problem. I guess I could
    take the brake off= for=20 the winter in order to make room for a
    chain or studs. <BR><BR>Thanks, <=
    BR>Joe=20
    Merrill</FONT> </FONT></DIV>
    <DIV> </DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>

----__JNP_000_7f63.441f.440a–


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–part1_12d.85db2c1.29371573_boundary

Well, those were pretty cool links you all provided. Unfortunately the
widest studded Nokian is 24 x 1.75" as someone pointed out. The Nokian
“Freddies Revenz 336” looks to be very enticing (it should be for $139),
but it is 26."

I will not buy another muni. I will not buy another muni.

So it looks like homemade studded tires the only possibility for my 24" or
a bike tire chain. I would have to sacrifice a $56 Gazz 3.0 to stud my own
tire, unless there’s a cheapo alternative out there. Is anybody seriously
using a homemade studded tire or a chain in the winter months? Tnen again,
the Gazz does pretty well on its own in plain old snow.

Course, if this “global warming keeps up” it will all be a moot point.

Joe Merrill

–part1_12d.85db2c1.29371573_boundary Content-Type: text/html;
charset=“US-ASCII”

<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=2>Well, those were pretty cool
links you all provided. Unfortunately the widest studded
Nokian is 24 x 1.75" as someone pointed out. The Nokian
“Freddies Revenz 336” looks to be very enticing (it should be for $139),
but it is 26." <BR> <BR>I will not buy another muni. I will
not buy another muni. <BR> <BR>So it looks like homemade studded tires the
only possibility for my 24" or a bike tire chain. I would have to
sacrifice a $56 Gazz 3.0 to stud my own tire, unless there’s a cheapo
alternative out there. Is anybody seriously using a homemade studded
tire or a chain in the winter months? Tnen again, the Gazz
does pretty well on its own in plain old snow. <BR> <BR>Course, if this
“global warming keeps up” it will all be a moot point. <BR> <BR>Joe
Merrill <BR> <BR> <BR></FONT></HTML>

–part1_12d.85db2c1.29371573_boundary–

Nycjoe@aol.com wrote:
> So it looks like homemade studded tires the only possibility for my 24"
> or a bike tire chain. I would have to sacrifice a $56 Gazz 3.0 to stud
> my own tire, unless there’s a cheapo alternative out there.

Sacrifice, you say? I zipped all the hex head screws out of my home
studded Intense 26x2.7, took all of about two minutes, and it’s been on
two friends’ bikes since.

> Is anybody seriously using a homemade studded tire or a chain in the
> winter months? Tnen again, the Gazz does pretty well on its own in plain
> old snow.

You are right, ice is the only reason to want studs. I never noticed any
difference between studs and no studs on plain snow.

Chris

In article <mailman.1006962510.20328.rsu@unicycling.org>,
jeff d tuttle <moosebreath1@juno.com> writes:

>
> I made a pair of chains last year, but I don’t like the extra weight.
> They do help some, though.
>

I’m curious about this. How did you do it/them? I was thinking of taking a
long length if chain and wrapping it in a spiral around the tire. The
spokes would keep it from shifting around too much. The chain I had in
mind was the type made of brass shim-stock with each link being a
folded-over figure-8.

The problem I saw was that my forks aren’t wide enough to accommodate the
extra thickness of chain around the tire.

Here in Ottawa we have a lengthy canal which freezes over and is run as a
monstrous (8km) skating rink. I was trying to dream up a way to get out on
it on a uni.

============================================================
Gardner Buchanan <gbuchana@rogers.com> Ottawa, ON FreeBSD: Where you want
to go. Today.

“Gardner Buchanan” <gbuchana@gromit.dhs.org> wrote in message
news:xdDN7.191487$5h5.85803245@news3.rdc2.on.home.com
> Here in Ottawa we have a lengthy canal which freezes over and is run as
> a monstrous (8km) skating rink. I was trying to dream up a way to get
> out on it on a uni.

Okay, I am soooo jealous.

Anyone know somewhere in Europe where I can go and skate on canals? Does
it still freeze enough in Holland at all?

Joe

Joe Marshall wrote:
> > Here in Ottawa we have a lengthy canal which freezes over and is run
> > as a monstrous (8km) skating rink. I was trying to dream up a way to
> > get out on it on a uni.
>
> Okay, I am soooo jealous.
>
> Anyone know somewhere in Europe where I can go and skate on canals? Does
> it still freeze enough in Holland at all?

The Rideau Canal, to which Gardner is referring, becomes in winter the
world’s longest ice-skating rink. I believe “longest” because it is
contiguous and it is groomed as a skating rink rather than just being a
long stretch of frozen canal that people can find a spot to skate on. It
also becomes a very large ice sculpture farm as well.

Yes, that would be a rather interesting unicycling experience.

Christopher

“Be Bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.” -Basil King (Anyone who
can give me more info on THIS Basil King please email
me.)

My small but growing site: http://home.earthlink.net/~crgrove/index.htm

If you are in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti, MI area check out my resume and if
you know of a company that fits me please let me know… Thanks!

Chris Reeder wrote:
>
> Nycjoe@aol.com wrote:
> > So it looks like homemade studded tires the only possibility for my
> > 24" or a bike tire chain. I would have to sacrifice a $56 Gazz 3.0 to
> > stud my own tire, unless there’s a cheapo alternative out there.
>
> Sacrifice, you say? I zipped all the hex head screws out of my home
> studded Intense 26x2.7, took all of about two minutes, and it’s been on
> two friends’ bikes since.

Chris, can you explain in more detail exactly how one studs their own
tires. I guess I’d like an exact description of the screws that you use as
well as where you place them.

I assume that as long as the end result doesn’t have a screw-tip sticking
through it doesn’t matter if one makes a mistake and then removes the
screw to a new spot. A hole wouldn’t hurt because it is the tube that
holds the air. ??

Are the hex heads pretty much the smallest hexes that you can buy then?

Christopher

“Be Bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.” -Basil King (Anyone who
can give me more info on THIS Basil King please email
me.)

My small but growing site: http://home.earthlink.net/~crgrove/index.htm

If you are in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti, MI area check out my resume and if
you know of a company that fits me please let me know… Thanks!

Chris Reeder wrote:
>
> Nycjoe@aol.com wrote:
> > So it looks like homemade studded tires the only possibility for my
> > 24" or a bike tire chain. I would have to sacrifice a $56 Gazz 3.0 to
> > stud my own tire, unless there’s a cheapo alternative out there.
>
> Sacrifice, you say? I zipped all the hex head screws out of my home
> studded Intense 26x2.7, took all of about two minutes, and it’s been on
> two friends’ bikes since.

Chris, can you explain in more detail exactly how one studs their own
tires. I guess I’d like an exact description of the screws that you use as
well as where you place them.

I assume that as long as the end result doesn’t have a screw-tip sticking
through it doesn’t matter if one makes a mistake and then removes the
screw to a new spot. A hole wouldn’t hurt because it is the tube that
holds the air. ??

Are the hex heads pretty much the smallest hexes that you can buy then?

Christopher

“Be Bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.” -Basil King (Anyone who
can give me more info on THIS Basil King please email
me.)

My small but growing site: http://home.earthlink.net/~crgrove/index.htm

If you are in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti, MI area check out my resume and if
you know of a company that fits me please let me know… Thanks!

Chris Reeder wrote:
>
> Nycjoe@aol.com wrote:
> > So it looks like homemade studded tires the only possibility for my
> > 24" or a bike tire chain. I would have to sacrifice a $56 Gazz 3.0 to
> > stud my own tire, unless there’s a cheapo alternative out there.
>
> Sacrifice, you say? I zipped all the hex head screws out of my home
> studded Intense 26x2.7, took all of about two minutes, and it’s been on
> two friends’ bikes since.

Chris, can you explain in more detail exactly how one studs their own
tires. I guess I’d like an exact description of the screws that you use as
well as where you place them.

I assume that as long as the end result doesn’t have a screw-tip sticking
through it doesn’t matter if one makes a mistake and then removes the
screw to a new spot. A hole wouldn’t hurt because it is the tube that
holds the air. ??

Are the hex heads pretty much the smallest hexes that you can buy then?

Christopher

“Be Bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.” -Basil King (Anyone who
can give me more info on THIS Basil King please email
me.)

My small but growing site: http://home.earthlink.net/~crgrove/index.htm

If you are in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti, MI area check out my resume and if
you know of a company that fits me please let me know… Thanks!

–part1_80.13f1fea2.29391214_boundary

If you follow se eral of the links given at the beginning of this thread,
“home tire studding” is explained in detail. Looks like it would work well
for sheer ice. Joe In a message dated 11/30/2001 11:23:01 AM Eastern
Standard Time, c_r_grove@yahoo.com writes:

> Chris, can you explain in more detail exactly how one studs their own
> tires. I guess I’d like an exact description of the screws that you use
> as well as where you place them

–part1_80.13f1fea2.29391214_boundary Content-Type: text/html;
charset=“US-ASCII”

<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=2>If you follow se eral of the
links given at the beginning of this thread, “home tire studding” is
explained in detail. Looks like it would work well for sheer ice.
<BR>Joe <BR>In a message dated 11/30/2001 11:23:01 AM Eastern Standard
Time, c_r_grove@yahoo.com writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE
style=“BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT:
0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px”>Chris, can you explain in more detail exactly how
one studs their <BR>own tires. I guess I’d like an exact description
of the screws <BR>that you use as well as where you place them</FONT><FONT
COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY=“SANSSERIF” FACE=“Arial”
LANG=“0”></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2
FAMILY=“SANSSERIF” FACE=“Arial” LANG=“0”> <BR></FONT></HTML>

–part1_80.13f1fea2.29391214_boundary–

–part1_d7.fed35a2.29391303_boundary

One of the links given earlier is a commercial site selling the type that
don’t touch the rim. They wouldn’t get in the way of the fork.

Joe In a message dated 11/29/2001 10:48:45 PM Eastern Standard Time,
gbuchana@gromit.dhs.org writes:

> I’m curious about this. How did you do it/them? I was thinking of taking
> a long length if chain and wrapping it in a spiral around the tire. The
> spokes would keep it from shifting around too much. The chain I had in
> mind was the type made of brass shim-stock with each link being a
> folded-over figure-8.
>
> The problem I saw was that my forks aren’t wide enough to accommodate
> the extra thickness of chain around the tire.
>
>

–part1_d7.fed35a2.29391303_boundary Content-Type: text/html;
charset=“US-ASCII”

<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT SIZE=2>One of the links given
earlier is a commercial site selling the type that don’t touch the rim.
They wouldn’t get in the way of the fork. <BR> <BR>Joe <BR>In a
message dated 11/29/2001 10:48:45 PM Eastern Standard Time,
gbuchana@gromit.dhs.org writes: <BR> <BR> <BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE
style=“BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT:
0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px”>I’m curious about this. How did you do
it/them? I was <BR>thinking of taking a long length if chain and
wrapping <BR>it in a spiral around the tire. The spokes would keep
<BR>it from shifting around too much. The chain I had in <BR>mind
was the type made of brass shim-stock with each link <BR>being a
folded-over figure-8. <BR> <BR>The problem I saw was that my forks aren’t
wide enough <BR>to accommodate the extra thickness of chain around the
<BR>tire. <BR> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY=“SANSSERIF”
FACE=“Arial” LANG=“0”></BLOCKQUOTE> <BR></FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000"
SIZE=2 FAMILY=“SANSSERIF” FACE=“Arial” LANG=“0”> <BR></FONT></HTML>

–part1_d7.fed35a2.29391303_boundary–

Thanks… I had seen those links and then promptly forgot them.
:-7

It isn’t at all how I had envisioned how it was done.

Christopher

“Be Bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.” -Basil King (Anyone who
can give me more info on THIS Basil King please email
me.)

My small but growing site: http://home.earthlink.net/~crgrove/index.htm

If you are in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti, MI area check out my resume and if
you know of a company that fits me please let me know… Thanks!

I have used small (and short) hex-heads going from outside to in, and I’ve
used button-head or flush mount screws from inside to out. I liked the
traction better with the inside-out method, especially on really hard ice.
However I had an easier time installing the outside-in hex heads, and I
had fewer flats as well. Either way, definitely use an electric
screwdriver or a variable speed drill instead of the manual method.

With outside-in, the screws should be short enough that they don’t reach
the tube. But you start to bottom out the rim on objects, and you start
getting flats because of the extra metal in the tire. With the inside-out
method, you definitely need good tire liners as the heads would otherwise
be resting right on the tube. Duct tape is what I used, but even two
layers is not sufficient, hence my flats with this method. Probably the
best would be a couple of Mr. Tuffy tire liners taped side by side so that
it’s wide enough for a 3" tire. Another idea we threw around but never
tried was slitting an extra downhill tube and just laying that inside the
tire for protection.

Chris

Christopher Grove wrote:
>
> Chris Reeder wrote:
> >
> > Nycjoe@aol.com wrote:
> > > So it looks like homemade studded tires the only possibility for my
> > > 24" or a bike tire chain. I would have to sacrifice a $56 Gazz 3.0
> > > to stud my own tire, unless there’s a cheapo alternative out there.
> >
> > Sacrifice, you say? I zipped all the hex head screws out of my home
> > studded Intense 26x2.7, took all of about two minutes, and it’s been
> > on two friends’ bikes since.
>
> Chris, can you explain in more detail exactly how one studs their own
> tires. I guess I’d like an exact description of the screws that you use
> as well as where you place them.
>
> I assume that as long as the end result doesn’t have a screw-tip
> sticking through it doesn’t matter if one makes a mistake and then
> removes the screw to a new spot. A hole wouldn’t hurt because it is the
> tube that holds the air. ??
>
> Are the hex heads pretty much the smallest hexes that you can buy then?
>
> Christopher
> –
> “Be Bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.” -Basil King (Anyone
> who can give me more info on THIS Basil King please email
> me.)
>
> My small but growing site: http://home.earthlink.net/~crgrove/index.htm
>
> If you are in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti, MI area check out my resume and
> if you know of a company that fits me please let me know… Thanks!

I have used small (and short) hex-heads going from outside to in, and I’ve
used button-head or flush mount screws from inside to out. I liked the
traction better with the inside-out method, especially on really hard ice.
However I had an easier time installing the outside-in hex heads, and I
had fewer flats as well. Either way, definitely use an electric
screwdriver or a variable speed drill instead of the manual method.

With outside-in, the screws should be short enough that they don’t reach
the tube. But you start to bottom out the rim on objects, and you start
getting flats because of the extra metal in the tire. With the inside-out
method, you definitely need good tire liners as the heads would otherwise
be resting right on the tube. Duct tape is what I used, but even two
layers is not sufficient, hence my flats with this method. Probably the
best would be a couple of Mr. Tuffy tire liners taped side by side so that
it’s wide enough for a 3" tire. Another idea we threw around but never
tried was slitting an extra downhill tube and just laying that inside the
tire for protection.

Chris

Christopher Grove wrote:
>
> Chris Reeder wrote:
> >
> > Nycjoe@aol.com wrote:
> > > So it looks like homemade studded tires the only possibility for my
> > > 24" or a bike tire chain. I would have to sacrifice a $56 Gazz 3.0
> > > to stud my own tire, unless there’s a cheapo alternative out there.
> >
> > Sacrifice, you say? I zipped all the hex head screws out of my home
> > studded Intense 26x2.7, took all of about two minutes, and it’s been
> > on two friends’ bikes since.
>
> Chris, can you explain in more detail exactly how one studs their own
> tires. I guess I’d like an exact description of the screws that you use
> as well as where you place them.
>
> I assume that as long as the end result doesn’t have a screw-tip
> sticking through it doesn’t matter if one makes a mistake and then
> removes the screw to a new spot. A hole wouldn’t hurt because it is the
> tube that holds the air. ??
>
> Are the hex heads pretty much the smallest hexes that you can buy then?
>
> Christopher
> –
> “Be Bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.” -Basil King (Anyone
> who can give me more info on THIS Basil King please email
> me.)
>
> My small but growing site: http://home.earthlink.net/~crgrove/index.htm
>
> If you are in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti, MI area check out my resume and
> if you know of a company that fits me please let me know… Thanks!

I have used small (and short) hex-heads going from outside to in, and I’ve
used button-head or flush mount screws from inside to out. I liked the
traction better with the inside-out method, especially on really hard ice.
However I had an easier time installing the outside-in hex heads, and I
had fewer flats as well. Either way, definitely use an electric
screwdriver or a variable speed drill instead of the manual method.

With outside-in, the screws should be short enough that they don’t reach
the tube. But you start to bottom out the rim on objects, and you start
getting flats because of the extra metal in the tire. With the inside-out
method, you definitely need good tire liners as the heads would otherwise
be resting right on the tube. Duct tape is what I used, but even two
layers is not sufficient, hence my flats with this method. Probably the
best would be a couple of Mr. Tuffy tire liners taped side by side so that
it’s wide enough for a 3" tire. Another idea we threw around but never
tried was slitting an extra downhill tube and just laying that inside the
tire for protection.

Chris

Christopher Grove wrote:
>
> Chris Reeder wrote:
> >
> > Nycjoe@aol.com wrote:
> > > So it looks like homemade studded tires the only possibility for my
> > > 24" or a bike tire chain. I would have to sacrifice a $56 Gazz 3.0
> > > to stud my own tire, unless there’s a cheapo alternative out there.
> >
> > Sacrifice, you say? I zipped all the hex head screws out of my home
> > studded Intense 26x2.7, took all of about two minutes, and it’s been
> > on two friends’ bikes since.
>
> Chris, can you explain in more detail exactly how one studs their own
> tires. I guess I’d like an exact description of the screws that you use
> as well as where you place them.
>
> I assume that as long as the end result doesn’t have a screw-tip
> sticking through it doesn’t matter if one makes a mistake and then
> removes the screw to a new spot. A hole wouldn’t hurt because it is the
> tube that holds the air. ??
>
> Are the hex heads pretty much the smallest hexes that you can buy then?
>
> Christopher
> –
> “Be Bold and mighty forces will come to your aid.” -Basil King (Anyone
> who can give me more info on THIS Basil King please email
> me.)
>
> My small but growing site: http://home.earthlink.net/~crgrove/index.htm
>
> If you are in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti, MI area check out my resume and
> if you know of a company that fits me please let me know… Thanks!

Joe, I live in the Netherlands. Right now it is quite warm. Statistically,
in most winters there will be a spell when skating on natural ice is
possible, not necessarily canals as they are deep and take longer to
freeze enough. On the other hand, the possibility of skating on canals in
not uncommon, happens on average every other year, I would guess. Having
said that, serious skaters here (apart from training on indoor rinks) go
e.g. to Finland or highish lakes in Austria where ice conditions are much
more secure.

BTW, Holland is different from The Netherlands. The Netherlands is the
country, a particular part of it (where I happen to live) is Holland
(consists of two provinces). It used to be the most important and most
prosperous part, and still is seen to be by some. It is a bit like the
term “England” sometimes used for all of the UK.

Not Holland, but Friesland (another Dutch province) is most famous for
skating on canals and lakes.

Klaas Bil

On Fri, 30 Nov 2001 11:21:08 GMT, “Joe Marshall”
<news@joemarshall.org.uk> wrote:

>
>“Gardner Buchanan” <gbuchana@gromit.dhs.org> wrote in message
>news:xdDN7.191487$5h5.85803245@news3.rdc2.on.home.com
>> Here in Ottawa we have a lengthy canal which freezes over and is run as
>> a monstrous (8km) skating rink. I was trying to dream up a way to get
>> out on it on a uni.
>
>Okay, I am soooo jealous.
>
>Anyone know somewhere in Europe where I can go and skate on canals? Does
>it still freeze enough in Holland at all?
>
>Joe
>
>


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