Getting High in Colorado II

Two more pics of MUni and Cokering in the high country. I will send one at a time.

pic #2

Great pictures, Mike. Where were they taken?

Re: Getting High in Colorado II

phew! did not know you could climb such steep trails with a Coker!
(170mm cranks ?)

would a geared Coker (essentially with reduction …) be possible?
(for instance ratios from 1/3 to 1,20)

bear

Re: Re: Getting High in Colorado II

I’m sure it could be done, but what’s the point? Consider a 24", 26", or 28/29" wheel. It’s lighter, and you have a choice of more than one tire! :smiley:

Re: Getting High in Colorado II

On Wed, 29 Oct 2003 10:29:18 -0600, gbarnes
<gbarnes.w2k7l@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>Great pictures, Mike. Where were they taken?

Sometimes, and also in this case, an attached picture’s filename
contains useful info. Right-click the pic and chose Save As to see the
filename, you don’t have to actually save it.

first pic: mike muni rim trail.jpg
second pic: mike top of independance pass 12,095 fall 03’.jpg

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

Grizzly bear droppings have bells in them and smell like pepper spray. - UniBrier

>>Great pictures, Mike. Where were they taken?

The MUni picture is from a 15 mile single track combo in Snowmass Village, three ski areas away from Aspen. The part I am on is the RIM TRAIL section.

The Coker picture is from the top of Independence Pass, a 4000’ vertical climb that starts in Aspen.

October was so warm that I was able to ride with very little clothing on both rides.

>>phew! did not know you could climb such steep trails with a Coker!

Most mountain passes are around 7% grade, but I’ve been on some that are up to 20%, thats steep but rideable.
I only use 175 cranks for Uniing around here, both Coker and MUni, there just arent many flat sections in the Rocky Mountains.

Re: Re: Re: Getting High in Colorado II

ok my post was not clear enough.
how do you climb steep slopes with a Coker?
apparently aspen mike does it! but really I do not think I can.
I would love to have a “trail” uni to go along (long) firetrails in the mountains
(that is: do not need a machine that “climbs to tree” like a full blown muni,
but something able to gobble kilometers )
so does a Uni with “reduced” gears make sense to climb long slopes?
(be it a 29er or a Coker)

thanks
bear

Re: Re: Re: Getting High in Colorado II

What he meant was using gears that could be changed while driving: (for instance ratios from 1/3 to 1,20). These have been made. It would be cool to have a Coker with gears so you could really speed up with something like that 1,20 and go uphills with 2/3. 1/3 might be too small ratio. Maybe should ask Greg Harper and Unifrank about their unicycles. You can also try searching for gears in unicycles.

edit. And remember brakes. I think those hubs with gears can’t be used backwards, so you would be coasting downhills at really high speeds.

Re: Getting High in Colorado II

On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 07:23:22 -0600, joona
<joona.w46b2@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>What he meant was using gears that could be changed while driving
I didn’t read it like that.

>These have been made.
Do you have more info? I’ve heard some ideas about them but wasn’t
aware that shift-on-the-fly geared unis have actually been made.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

Grizzly bear droppings have bells in them and smell like pepper spray. - UniBrier

What about the shift on the stop hubs, can you install one on a 36" wheel. It would be crazy to ride a Coker with a 54" gear. Thanks.