Gates pledges $100 million to AIDS battle

Copyright © 2001 The Seattle Times Company

Nation & World : Wednesday, June 20, 2001

Gates pledges $100 million to AIDS battle

By Seattle Times news services

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation said yesterday that it will
contribute $100 million to a global fund to combat AIDS in developing
countries, particularly hard-hit sub-Saharan Africa.

It also called on other international donors to support the fund begun
last spring by U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan.

The $100 million, to be contributed over an unspecified number of years,
is in addition to about $350 million the foundation has contributed to
global efforts to stop the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus
(HIV), which causes AIDS, and to research an AIDS vaccine.

“We believe that there is no higher priority than stopping transmission of
this deadly disease,” said Bill Gates, co-founder of both Microsoft and
the foundation.

A major contribution from Gates was considered critical to the fund’s
success, and foundation President Patty Stonesifer expressed hope the
money would “act as a catalyst” to stimulate other giving. She said the
money will be directed to programs for prevention of HIV transmission.

The contribution “will form a cornerstone of the emerging global effort to
reverse the HIV-AIDS pandemic,” Annan said yesterday in a statement
released by U.N. deputy spokesman Manoel de Almeida e Silva.

The gift ranks close to what two governments so far have pledged to the
fund. The U.S. has pledged $200 million and France $127 million.

Annan said in April that $7 billion to $10 billion would be needed each
year to turn back the spread of HIV, which infects 36 million people
worldwide, 70 percent of them in sub-Saharan Africa. Globally, the virus
has killed 23 million people, including 17 million in sub-Saharan Africa.

The idea was that $1 billion would be pledged to the Global Fund for AIDS
and Health by next week, when the U.N. General Assembly will hold a
special session on AIDS.

Including the Gates foundation money, about $428 million has been pledged,
according to figures supplied by Gregory Hartl, a spokesman for the World
Health Organization in Geneva.

Credit-Suisse, a Swiss bank, has agreed to give $1 million; and Annan will
donate his $100,000 in prize money from the Philadelphia Liberty Medal, to
be awarded in Philadelphia on July Fourth.

The fund is aimed at helping poor countries establish prevention,
treatment and care programs for HIV.

Discussion of the fund became bogged down in questions of how it would be
organized and administered and how the money would be divided between
prevention programs and payment for expensive anti-retroviral drug
treatment.

Other than a statement supporting Annan’s idea and emphasizing the
importance of prevention, released at the time of Annan’s announcement,
Gates had remained silent. As a key player in the global effort against
AIDS, his perceived reticence to contribute was seen by some as a lack of
confidence in the fund.

But in the past several months, foundation officials investigated how the
fund would work and apparently were satisfied with the results.

Although details of fund administration and disbursal are unlikely to be
completed for many months, Stonesifer said, “the reason we’re going now is
both because we believe we can use the funds appropriately” and to “prime
the pump” for other potential donors.

The Gates foundation, which has an asset base of $23.5 billion, spent more
than $1 billion on health projects around the world last year.

Without action, an estimated 100 million people will be infected by 2005,
warned a report yesterday by the International Crisis Group, a private
organization that works to prevent conflicts in global hot spots.

The group, headed by Martti Ahtisaari, former president of Finland, warned
that AIDS was no longer just a public-health issue but also a
national-security issue because it “destroys the very fiber of what
constitutes a nation” by dismantling families, wiping out large segments
of the work force, and undermining the military and police forces.

The group said wealthy countries still have a chance to stem the pandemic,
if they act quickly.

“This is a window of opportunity,” the group said. “But the history of the
AIDS crisis tells us that window will not stay open for long.”

Compiled from reports by The Washington Post, Knight Ridder Newspapers and
The Associated Press.

Copyright © 2001 The Seattle Times Company

Gary Stein wrote:
>
> Gates pledges $100 million to AIDS battle

Applause to Mr. Gates, for once.

(I know he’s a huge philanthropist)

-Mike K.

Let 's end the insane war on drugs, and turn those billions into fighting
this and other diseases.

Tax drugs and pay the national debt.

Install a flat tax so people can actually plan on giving to causes they
believe in, instead of what the govt. wants to allow.


JD

“Of course that’s just my opinion, I could be wrong . . .” Dennis Miller


Gary Stein wrote in message
<9gtiv9$o3d$1@constitution.worldwebserver.com>…
>Copyright © 2001 The Seattle Times Company
>
>Nation & World : Wednesday, June 20, 2001
>
>Gates pledges $100 million to AIDS battle
>
>By Seattle Times news services
>
>
>The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation said yesterday that it will
contribute
>$100 million to a global fund to combat AIDS in developing countries,
>particularly hard-hit sub-Saharan Africa.
>
>It also called on other international donors to support the fund begun
>last spring by U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan.
>
>The $100 million, to be contributed over an unspecified number of years,
>is in addition to about $350 million the foundation has contributed to
>global efforts to stop the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus
>(HIV), which causes AIDS, and to research an AIDS vaccine.
>
>"We believe that there is no higher priority than stopping transmission
>of this deadly disease," said Bill Gates, co-founder of both Microsoft
>and the foundation.
>
>A major contribution from Gates was considered critical to the fund’s
>success, and foundation President Patty Stonesifer expressed hope the
>money would “act as a catalyst” to stimulate other giving. She said
>the money
will
>be directed to programs for prevention of HIV transmission.
>
>The contribution "will form a cornerstone of the emerging global effort
>to reverse the HIV-AIDS pandemic," Annan said yesterday in a statement
released
>by U.N. deputy spokesman Manoel de Almeida e Silva.
>
>The gift ranks close to what two governments so far have pledged to the
>fund. The U.S. has pledged $200 million and France $127 million.
>
>Annan said in April that $7 billion to $10 billion would be needed each
year
>to turn back the spread of HIV, which infects 36 million people
>worldwide, 70 percent of them in sub-Saharan Africa. Globally, the virus
>has killed 23 million people, including 17 million in sub-Saharan Africa.
>
>The idea was that $1 billion would be pledged to the Global Fund for AIDS
>and Health by next week, when the U.N. General Assembly will hold a
>special session on AIDS.
>
>Including the Gates foundation money, about $428 million has been
>pledged, according to figures supplied by Gregory Hartl, a spokesman for
>the World Health Organization in Geneva.
>
>Credit-Suisse, a Swiss bank, has agreed to give $1 million; and Annan
>will donate his $100,000 in prize money from the Philadelphia Liberty
>Medal, to be awarded in Philadelphia on July Fourth.
>
>The fund is aimed at helping poor countries establish prevention,
>treatment and care programs for HIV.
>
>Discussion of the fund became bogged down in questions of how it would be
>organized and administered and how the money would be divided between
>prevention programs and payment for expensive anti-retroviral drug
>treatment.
>
>Other than a statement supporting Annan’s idea and emphasizing the
>importance of prevention, released at the time of Annan’s announcement,
>Gates had remained silent. As a key player in the global effort against
>AIDS, his perceived reticence to contribute was seen by some as a lack of
>confidence in the fund.
>
>But in the past several months, foundation officials investigated how the
>fund would work and apparently were satisfied with the results.
>
>Although details of fund administration and disbursal are unlikely to be
>completed for many months, Stonesifer said, "the reason we’re going now
>is both because we believe we can use the funds appropriately" and to
>“prime the pump” for other potential donors.
>
>The Gates foundation, which has an asset base of $23.5 billion, spent
>more than $1 billion on health projects around the world last year.
>
>Without action, an estimated 100 million people will be infected by 2005,
>warned a report yesterday by the International Crisis Group, a private
>organization that works to prevent conflicts in global hot spots.
>
>The group, headed by Martti Ahtisaari, former president of Finland,
>warned that AIDS was no longer just a public-health issue but also a
>national-security issue because it "destroys the very fiber of what
>constitutes a nation" by dismantling families, wiping out large segments
>of the work force, and undermining the military and police forces.
>
>The group said wealthy countries still have a chance to stem the
>pandemic, if they act quickly.
>
>“This is a window of opportunity,” the group said. "But the history of
>the AIDS crisis tells us that window will not stay open for long."
>
>Compiled from reports by The Washington Post, Knight Ridder Newspapers
>and The Associated Press.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>Copyright © 2001 The Seattle Times Company

“JD” <jd@alegate.com> wrote in message
news:9h5cqm$q7c$1@constitution.worldwebserver.com
> Let 's end the insane war on drugs, and turn those billions into
> fighting this and other diseases.
>
> Tax drugs and pay the national debt.

You mean like they have done it with other drugs in the past?

Smoking and alcohol


Roland Mösl http://pege.org Clear targets for a confused civilization
http://BeingFound.com Web Design starts at the search engine

Yes, exactly as they have done with alcohol and tobacco.


JD

“Of course that’s just my opinion, I could be wrong . . .” Dennis Miller


Roland Mösl wrote in message
<9h5fvm$qvc$2@constitution.worldwebserver.com>…
>“JD” <jd@alegate.com> wrote in message
>news:9h5cqm$q7c$1@constitution.worldwebserver.com
>> Let 's end the insane war on drugs, and turn those billions into
>> fighting this and other diseases.
>>
>> Tax drugs and pay the national debt.
>
>You mean like they have done it with other drugs in the past?
>
>Smoking and alcohol
>
>
>
>–
>Roland Mösl http://pege.org Clear targets for a confused civilization
>http://BeingFound.com Web Design starts at the search engine

flat tax and giving to cause you chose. I’m not seeing the connection.
Flat taxes do nothing but transfer the majority of the tax responsibility
to the middle class away from the rich. the Flat tax in no way helps lower
income groups, it actually penalizes them. I’m willing to bet there are
more rich donators because they get tax writeoffs inaddition to the good
nature of them all.

I do agree with the taxation of drugs to an extent, but once again I think
more has to be focused on solutions for rehabilitation. The poor make up a
large number of the drug users, and they will e the ones getting taxed. If
you were to tax it, then a larger part ofd that money should be put
towards drug education and rehabilitation. Methadone needs a replacement
and many drugs need viable method of treatment, more research needs to be
done in the area of drug addiction.


Brian Wilmot http://www.jumpnow.net/ http://www.uglybillboards.com/ “You
can die but you’re never dead” - Red Hot Chili Peppers “JD”
<jd@alegate.com> wrote in message
news:9h5cqm$q7c$1@constitution.worldwebserver.com
> Let 's end the insane war on drugs, and turn those billions into
> fighting this and other diseases.
>
> Tax drugs and pay the national debt.
>
> Install a flat tax so people can actually plan on giving to causes they
> believe in, instead of what the govt. wants to allow.
>
> –
> JD
>
> “Of course that’s just my opinion, I could be wrong . . .” Dennis Miller
>
> —
> Gary Stein wrote in message
> <9gtiv9$o3d$1@constitution.worldwebserver.com>…
> >Copyright © 2001 The Seattle Times Company
> >
> >Nation & World : Wednesday, June 20, 2001
> >
> >Gates pledges $100 million to AIDS battle
> >
> >By Seattle Times news services
> >
> >
> >The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation said yesterday that it will
> contribute
> >$100 million to a global fund to combat AIDS in developing countries,
> >particularly hard-hit sub-Saharan Africa.
> >
> >It also called on other international donors to support the fund begun
last
> >spring by U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan.
> >
> >The $100 million, to be contributed over an unspecified number
> >of years,
is
> >in addition to about $350 million the foundation has contributed to
global
> >efforts to stop the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),
which
> >causes AIDS, and to research an AIDS vaccine.
> >
> >"We believe that there is no higher priority than stopping transmission
of
> >this deadly disease," said Bill Gates, co-founder of both Microsoft and
the
> >foundation.
> >
> >A major contribution from Gates was considered critical to the fund’s
> >success, and foundation President Patty Stonesifer expressed hope the
money
> >would “act as a catalyst” to stimulate other giving. She said the money
> will
> >be directed to programs for prevention of HIV transmission.
> >
> >The contribution "will form a cornerstone of the emerging global effort
to
> >reverse the HIV-AIDS pandemic," Annan said yesterday in a statement
> released
> >by U.N. deputy spokesman Manoel de Almeida e Silva.
> >
> >The gift ranks close to what two governments so far have pledged to the
> >fund. The U.S. has pledged $200 million and France $127 million.
> >
> >Annan said in April that $7 billion to $10 billion would be needed each
> year
> >to turn back the spread of HIV, which infects 36 million people
worldwide,
> >70 percent of them in sub-Saharan Africa. Globally, the virus
> >has killed
23
> >million people, including 17 million in sub-Saharan Africa.
> >
> >The idea was that $1 billion would be pledged to the Global Fund
> >for AIDS and Health by next week, when the U.N. General Assembly
> >will hold a
special
> >session on AIDS.
> >
> >Including the Gates foundation money, about $428 million has been
pledged,
> >according to figures supplied by Gregory Hartl, a spokesman for the
> >World Health Organization in Geneva.
> >
> >Credit-Suisse, a Swiss bank, has agreed to give $1 million; and Annan
will
> >donate his $100,000 in prize money from the Philadelphia Liberty Medal,
to
> >be awarded in Philadelphia on July Fourth.
> >
> >The fund is aimed at helping poor countries establish prevention,
treatment
> >and care programs for HIV.
> >
> >Discussion of the fund became bogged down in questions of how it would
> >be organized and administered and how the money would be divided
> >between prevention programs and payment for expensive anti-retroviral
> >drug treatment.
> >
> >Other than a statement supporting Annan’s idea and emphasizing the
> >importance of prevention, released at the time of Annan’s announcement,
> >Gates had remained silent. As a key player in the global effort against
> >AIDS, his perceived reticence to contribute was seen by some as a lack
> >of confidence in the fund.
> >
> >But in the past several months, foundation officials investigated how
> >the fund would work and apparently were satisfied with the results.
> >
> >Although details of fund administration and disbursal are unlikely to
> >be completed for many months, Stonesifer said, "the reason we’re
> >going now
is
> >both because we believe we can use the funds appropriately" and to
> >“prime the pump” for other potential donors.
> >
> >The Gates foundation, which has an asset base of $23.5 billion, spent
more
> >than $1 billion on health projects around the world last year.
> >
> >Without action, an estimated 100 million people will be infected by
> >2005, warned a report yesterday by the International Crisis Group,
> >a private organization that works to prevent conflicts in global
> >hot spots.
> >
> >The group, headed by Martti Ahtisaari, former president of Finland,
warned
> >that AIDS was no longer just a public-health issue but also a
> >national-security issue because it "destroys the very fiber of what
> >constitutes a nation" by dismantling families, wiping out large
> >segments
of
> >the work force, and undermining the military and police forces.
> >
> >The group said wealthy countries still have a chance to stem the
pandemic,
> >if they act quickly.
> >
> >“This is a window of opportunity,” the group said. "But the history of
the
> >AIDS crisis tells us that window will not stay open for long."
> >
> >Compiled from reports by The Washington Post, Knight Ridder Newspapers
and
> >The Associated Press.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >Copyright © 2001 The Seattle Times Company
> >
> >
>

Three words about flat tax:

IT IS FAIR

Ok, four more words:

EVERYONE PAYS THE SAME


JD

“Of course that’s just my opinion, I could be wrong . . .” Dennis Miller


Brian Wilmot wrote in message
<9h5mhn$sla$1@constitution.worldwebserver.com>…
>flat tax and giving to cause you chose. I’m not seeing the connection.
>Flat taxes do nothing but transfer the majority of the tax responsibility
>to the middle class away from the rich. the Flat tax in no way helps
>lower income groups, it actually penalizes them. I’m willing to bet there
>are more rich donators because they get tax writeoffs inaddition to the
>good nature of them all.
>
>I do agree with the taxation of drugs to an extent, but once again I
>think more has to be focused on solutions for rehabilitation. The poor
>make up a large number of the drug users, and they will e the ones
>getting taxed. If you were to tax it, then a larger part ofd that money
>should be put towards drug education and rehabilitation. Methadone needs
>a replacement and many drugs need viable method of treatment, more
>research needs to be done in
the
>area of drug addiction.
>
>–
>Brian Wilmot http://www.jumpnow.net/ http://www.uglybillboards.com/ "You
>can die but you’re never dead" - Red Hot Chili Peppers “JD”
><jd@alegate.com> wrote in message
>news:9h5cqm$q7c$1@constitution.worldwebserver.com
>> Let 's end the insane war on drugs, and turn those billions into
>> fighting this and other diseases.
>>
>> Tax drugs and pay the national debt.
>>
>> Install a flat tax so people can actually plan on giving to causes they
>> believe in, instead of what the govt. wants to allow.
>>
>> –
>> JD
>>
>> “Of course that’s just my opinion, I could be wrong . . .”
>> Dennis Miller
>>
>> —
>> Gary Stein wrote in message
>> <9gtiv9$o3d$1@constitution.worldwebserver.com>…
>> >Copyright © 2001 The Seattle Times Company
>> >
>> >Nation & World : Wednesday, June 20, 2001
>> >
>> >Gates pledges $100 million to AIDS battle
>> >
>> >By Seattle Times news services
>> >
>> >
>> >The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation said yesterday that it will
>> contribute
>> >$100 million to a global fund to combat AIDS in developing countries,
>> >particularly hard-hit sub-Saharan Africa.
>> >
>> >It also called on other international donors to support the fund begun
>last
>> >spring by U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan.
>> >
>> >The $100 million, to be contributed over an unspecified number of
>> >years,
>is
>> >in addition to about $350 million the foundation has contributed to
>global
>> >efforts to stop the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),
>which
>> >causes AIDS, and to research an AIDS vaccine.
>> >
>> >"We believe that there is no higher priority than stopping
>> >transmission
>of
>> >this deadly disease," said Bill Gates, co-founder of both
>> >Microsoft and
>the
>> >foundation.
>> >
>> >A major contribution from Gates was considered critical to the fund’s
>> >success, and foundation President Patty Stonesifer expressed hope the
>money
>> >would “act as a catalyst” to stimulate other giving. She said
>> >the money
>> will
>> >be directed to programs for prevention of HIV transmission.
>> >
>> >The contribution "will form a cornerstone of the emerging global
>> >effort
>to
>> >reverse the HIV-AIDS pandemic," Annan said yesterday in a statement
>> released
>> >by U.N. deputy spokesman Manoel de Almeida e Silva.
>> >
>> >The gift ranks close to what two governments so far have pledged to
>> >the fund. The U.S. has pledged $200 million and France $127 million.
>> >
>> >Annan said in April that $7 billion to $10 billion would be
>> >needed each
>> year
>> >to turn back the spread of HIV, which infects 36 million people
>worldwide,
>> >70 percent of them in sub-Saharan Africa. Globally, the virus has
>> >killed
>23
>> >million people, including 17 million in sub-Saharan Africa.
>> >
>> >The idea was that $1 billion would be pledged to the Global Fund for
AIDS
>> >and Health by next week, when the U.N. General Assembly will hold a
>special
>> >session on AIDS.
>> >
>> >Including the Gates foundation money, about $428 million has been
>pledged,
>> >according to figures supplied by Gregory Hartl, a spokesman for the
World
>> >Health Organization in Geneva.
>> >
>> >Credit-Suisse, a Swiss bank, has agreed to give $1 million; and Annan
>will
>> >donate his $100,000 in prize money from the Philadelphia Liberty
>> >Medal,
>to
>> >be awarded in Philadelphia on July Fourth.
>> >
>> >The fund is aimed at helping poor countries establish prevention,
>treatment
>> >and care programs for HIV.
>> >
>> >Discussion of the fund became bogged down in questions of how it would
be
>> >organized and administered and how the money would be divided between
>> >prevention programs and payment for expensive anti-retroviral drug
>> >treatment.
>> >
>> >Other than a statement supporting Annan’s idea and emphasizing the
>> >importance of prevention, released at the time of Annan’s
>> >announcement, Gates had remained silent. As a key player in the global
>> >effort against AIDS, his perceived reticence to contribute was seen by
>> >some as a lack
of
>> >confidence in the fund.
>> >
>> >But in the past several months, foundation officials investigated how
the
>> >fund would work and apparently were satisfied with the results.
>> >
>> >Although details of fund administration and disbursal are unlikely to
>> >be completed for many months, Stonesifer said, "the reason we’re
>> >going now
>is
>> >both because we believe we can use the funds appropriately" and to
"prime
>> >the pump" for other potential donors.
>> >
>> >The Gates foundation, which has an asset base of $23.5 billion, spent
>more
>> >than $1 billion on health projects around the world last year.
>> >
>> >Without action, an estimated 100 million people will be infected by
2005,
>> >warned a report yesterday by the International Crisis Group, a private
>> >organization that works to prevent conflicts in global hot spots.
>> >
>> >The group, headed by Martti Ahtisaari, former president of Finland,
>warned
>> >that AIDS was no longer just a public-health issue but also a
>> >national-security issue because it "destroys the very fiber of what
>> >constitutes a nation" by dismantling families, wiping out large
>> >segments
>of
>> >the work force, and undermining the military and police forces.
>> >
>> >The group said wealthy countries still have a chance to stem the
>pandemic,
>> >if they act quickly.
>> >
>> >“This is a window of opportunity,” the group said. "But the history of
>the
>> >AIDS crisis tells us that window will not stay open for long."
>> >
>> >Compiled from reports by The Washington Post, Knight Ridder Newspapers
>and
>> >The Associated Press.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >Copyright © 2001 The Seattle Times Company
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>

the same eprcentage of their income, regardless of ability to pay. Doesn’t
seem fair to me that a family with an income of 40,000 and 3 kids pay the
same percentage that MR. Gates with his billions pays.

Oh and by the way…there is very little in our capitalistic country that
is fair, taxes are just another one of them.


Brian Wilmot http://www.jumpnow.net/ http://www.uglybillboards.com/ “You
can die but you’re never dead” - Red Hot Chili Peppers “JD”
<jd@alegate.com> wrote in message
news:9h5psr$tm8$1@constitution.worldwebserver.com
> Three words about flat tax:
>
> IT IS FAIR
>
> Ok, four more words:
>
> EVERYONE PAYS THE SAME
>
> –
> JD
>
> “Of course that’s just my opinion, I could be wrong . . .” Dennis Miller
>
> —
> Brian Wilmot wrote in message
> <9h5mhn$sla$1@constitution.worldwebserver.com>…
> >flat tax and giving to cause you chose. I’m not seeing the connection.
Flat
> >taxes do nothing but transfer the majority of the tax responsibility to
the
> >middle class away from the rich. the Flat tax in no way helps lower
income
> >groups, it actually penalizes them. I’m willing to bet there are more
rich
> >donators because they get tax writeoffs inaddition to the good nature
> >of them all.
> >
> >I do agree with the taxation of drugs to an extent, but once again I
think
> >more has to be focused on solutions for rehabilitation. The poor
> >make up
a
> >large number of the drug users, and they will e the ones getting taxed.
If
> >you were to tax it, then a larger part ofd that money should be put
towards
> >drug education and rehabilitation. Methadone needs a replacement and
> >many drugs need viable method of treatment, more research needs to be
> >done in
> the
> >area of drug addiction.
> >
> >–
> >Brian Wilmot http://www.jumpnow.net/ http://www.uglybillboards.com/
> >“You can die but you’re never dead” - Red Hot Chili Peppers “JD”
> ><jd@alegate.com> wrote in message
> >news:9h5cqm$q7c$1@constitution.worldwebserver.com
> >> Let 's end the insane war on drugs, and turn those billions into
fighting
> >> this and other diseases.
> >>
> >> Tax drugs and pay the national debt.
> >>
> >> Install a flat tax so people can actually plan on giving to causes
> >> they believe in, instead of what the govt. wants to allow.
> >>
> >> –
> >> JD
> >>
> >> “Of course that’s just my opinion, I could be wrong . . .” Dennis
> >> Miller
> >>
> >> —
> >> Gary Stein wrote in message
> >> <9gtiv9$o3d$1@constitution.worldwebserver.com>…
> >> >Copyright © 2001 The Seattle Times Company
> >> >
> >> >Nation & World : Wednesday, June 20, 2001
> >> >
> >> >Gates pledges $100 million to AIDS battle
> >> >
> >> >By Seattle Times news services
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation said yesterday that it will
> >> contribute
> >> >$100 million to a global fund to combat AIDS in developing
> >> >countries, particularly hard-hit sub-Saharan Africa.
> >> >
> >> >It also called on other international donors to support the fund
> >> >begun
> >last
> >> >spring by U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan.
> >> >
> >> >The $100 million, to be contributed over an unspecified number of
years,
> >is
> >> >in addition to about $350 million the foundation has contributed to
> >global
> >> >efforts to stop the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus
> >> >(HIV),
> >which
> >> >causes AIDS, and to research an AIDS vaccine.
> >> >
> >> >"We believe that there is no higher priority than stopping
transmission
> >of
> >> >this deadly disease," said Bill Gates, co-founder of both Microsoft
and
> >the
> >> >foundation.
> >> >
> >> >A major contribution from Gates was considered critical to the
> >> >fund’s success, and foundation President Patty Stonesifer expressed
> >> >hope the
> >money
> >> >would “act as a catalyst” to stimulate other giving. She said the
money
> >> will
> >> >be directed to programs for prevention of HIV transmission.
> >> >
> >> >The contribution "will form a cornerstone of the emerging global
effort
> >to
> >> >reverse the HIV-AIDS pandemic," Annan said yesterday in a statement
> >> released
> >> >by U.N. deputy spokesman Manoel de Almeida e Silva.
> >> >
> >> >The gift ranks close to what two governments so far have pledged to
the
> >> >fund. The U.S. has pledged $200 million and France $127 million.
> >> >
> >> >Annan said in April that $7 billion to $10 billion would be needed
each
> >> year
> >> >to turn back the spread of HIV, which infects 36 million people
> >worldwide,
> >> >70 percent of them in sub-Saharan Africa. Globally, the virus has
killed
> >23
> >> >million people, including 17 million in sub-Saharan Africa.
> >> >
> >> >The idea was that $1 billion would be pledged to the Global Fund for
> AIDS
> >> >and Health by next week, when the U.N. General Assembly will hold a
> >special
> >> >session on AIDS.
> >> >
> >> >Including the Gates foundation money, about $428 million has been
> >pledged,
> >> >according to figures supplied by Gregory Hartl, a spokesman for the
> World
> >> >Health Organization in Geneva.
> >> >
> >> >Credit-Suisse, a Swiss bank, has agreed to give $1 million; and
> >> >Annan
> >will
> >> >donate his $100,000 in prize money from the Philadelphia Liberty
Medal,
> >to
> >> >be awarded in Philadelphia on July Fourth.
> >> >
> >> >The fund is aimed at helping poor countries establish prevention,
> >treatment
> >> >and care programs for HIV.
> >> >
> >> >Discussion of the fund became bogged down in questions of how it
> >> >would
> be
> >> >organized and administered and how the money would be divided
> >> >between prevention programs and payment for expensive
> >> >anti-retroviral drug treatment.
> >> >
> >> >Other than a statement supporting Annan’s idea and emphasizing the
> >> >importance of prevention, released at the time of Annan’s
announcement,
> >> >Gates had remained silent. As a key player in the global effort
against
> >> >AIDS, his perceived reticence to contribute was seen by some as a
> >> >lack
> of
> >> >confidence in the fund.
> >> >
> >> >But in the past several months, foundation officials
> >> >investigated how
> the
> >> >fund would work and apparently were satisfied with the results.
> >> >
> >> >Although details of fund administration and disbursal are
> >> >unlikely to
be
> >> >completed for many months, Stonesifer said, "the reason we’re going
now
> >is
> >> >both because we believe we can use the funds appropriately" and to
> "prime
> >> >the pump" for other potential donors.
> >> >
> >> >The Gates foundation, which has an asset base of $23.5 billion,
> >> >spent
> >more
> >> >than $1 billion on health projects around the world last year.
> >> >
> >> >Without action, an estimated 100 million people will be infected by
> 2005,
> >> >warned a report yesterday by the International Crisis Group, a
> >> >private organization that works to prevent conflicts in global hot
> >> >spots.
> >> >
> >> >The group, headed by Martti Ahtisaari, former president of Finland,
> >warned
> >> >that AIDS was no longer just a public-health issue but also a
> >> >national-security issue because it "destroys the very fiber of what
> >> >constitutes a nation" by dismantling families, wiping out large
segments
> >of
> >> >the work force, and undermining the military and police forces.
> >> >
> >> >The group said wealthy countries still have a chance to stem the
> >pandemic,
> >> >if they act quickly.
> >> >
> >> >“This is a window of opportunity,” the group said. "But the
> >> >history of
> >the
> >> >AIDS crisis tells us that window will not stay open for long."
> >> >
> >> >Compiled from reports by The Washington Post, Knight Ridder
> >> >Newspapers
> >and
> >> >The Associated Press.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >Copyright © 2001 The Seattle Times Company
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
>

A flat tax??!! That’s a horrible idea. Talk about screwing over the
lower-class even more… A flat tax was used once in this country – in
the 1790’s in Massachusetts – which didn’t exactly turn out too well.

JD wrote:
>
> Install a flat tax so people can actually plan on giving to causes they
> believe in, instead of what the govt. wants to allow.


Jay Tierney – jay@jaytierney.com

http://www.bannerbum.com - Banner Ad Design http://www.moovees.com -
Movies meet Cows http://www.jaytierney.com - shameless self promoting web
site yet to be developed…

Four words about flat tax:

GOOD FOR THE RICH

Four more words:

SHITTY FOR THE POOR

Four more words:

DEVESTATING FOR THE NATION

JD wrote:
>
> Three words about flat tax:
>
> IT IS FAIR
>
> Ok, four more words:
>
> EVERYONE PAYS THE SAME


Jay Tierney – jay@jaytierney.com

http://www.bannerbum.com - Banner Ad Design http://www.moovees.com -
Movies meet Cows http://www.jaytierney.com - shameless self promoting web
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Exactly… here’s an obvious example of why a flat tax is just idiotic…

Family 1: income $4,000,000 – pays 10% tax of $400,000

Family 2: income of 40,000 – pays 10% tax of $4,000

Obviously that 4,000 dollars in tax is a hell of a lot of money to family
2, while 400,000 in taxes for family 1 won’t exactly put them in the poor
house. Sure, on basic, bullheaded principles I can see why it seems
unfair, but you have to be realistic (we operate as a nation, not as every
man for himself, which is why we pay taxes to begin with).

Brian Wilmot wrote:
>
> the same eprcentage of their income, regardless of ability to pay.
> Doesn’t seem fair to me that a family with an income of 40,000 and 3
> kids pay the same percentage that MR. Gates with his billions pays.


Jay Tierney – jay@jaytierney.com

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On Sun, 24 Jun 2001 19:33:53 -0700 Jay Tierney said…

> Exactly… here’s an obvious example of why a flat tax is just
> idiotic…
>
> Family 1: income $4,000,000 – pays 10% tax of $400,000
>
> Family 2: income of 40,000 – pays 10% tax of $4,000
>
> Obviously that 4,000 dollars in tax is a hell of a lot of money to
> family 2, while 400,000 in taxes for family 1 won’t exactly put them in
> the poor house. Sure, on basic, bullheaded principles I can see why it
> seems unfair, but you have to be realistic (we operate as a nation, not
> as every man for himself, which is why we pay taxes to begin with).

Well most of the flat tax schemes I have seen gives you a deduction of
$50,000 or so. In other words of you make less than xx you don’t have to
pay taxes.


John R. Marshall JRM Studios.com - http://www.jrmstudios.com The
Hotrodding Network - http://www.hotrodding.net

Your example, while dramatic, doesn’t reflect any of the actual flat tax
proposals. A more typical, realistic example would be:

Family 1: income: $4,000,000 – $37,000 deduction – pays 17% tax
of $673,710.

Family 2: income $400,000 – $37,000 deduction – pays 17% tax of $61,710.

Family 3: income $200,000 – $37,000 deduction – pays 17% tax of $27,710.

Family 4: income $100,000 – $37,000 deduction – pays 17% tax of $10,710.

Family 5: income $75,000 – $37,000 deduction – pays 17% tax of $6,460.

Family 6: income $40,000 – $37,000 deduction – pays 17% tax of $510.

“Jay Tierney” <jay@jaytierney.com> wrote in message
news:3B36A310.15125DB0@jaytierney.com
> Exactly… here’s an obvious example of why a flat tax is just
> idiotic…
>
> Family 1: income $4,000,000 – pays 10% tax of $400,000
>
> Family 2: income of 40,000 – pays 10% tax of $4,000
>
> Obviously that 4,000 dollars in tax is a hell of a lot of money to
> family 2, while 400,000 in taxes for family 1 won’t exactly put them in
> the poor house. Sure, on basic, bullheaded principles I can see why it
> seems unfair, but you have to be realistic (we operate as a nation, not
> as every man for himself, which is why we pay taxes to begin with).
>
> Brian Wilmot wrote:
> >
> > the same eprcentage of their income, regardless of ability to pay.
Doesn’t
> > seem fair to me that a family with an income of 40,000 and 3 kids pay
the
> > same percentage that MR. Gates with his billions pays.
>
> –
> Jay Tierney – jay@jaytierney.com

> http://www.bannerbum.com - Banner Ad Design http://www.moovees.com -
> Movies meet Cows http://www.jaytierney.com - shameless self promoting
> web site yet to be developed…