FW: Ride off the christmas pud

Sarah, We do not use the word “pud” in polite conversation here in America. just
kidding. I love the way you talk. seriously thought, “pud” means weenie over
here. As in “pulling your pud”

> -----Original Message----- From: Sarah Miller [SMTP:sarah@vimes.u-net.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2000 5:14 PM To: unicycling@winternet.com
> Subject: Ride off the christmas pud
>
> Paul my self and Roger got together for a little post chrimble muni ride this
> morning, in Swinley forest just south of Bracknell. We had to start early as I
> had to be at work at mid day, so a cold 9 am saw us leave the near deserted
> car park and head for the mud. I decided to be a bit crap to begin with and
> fell off on the really easy stuff, paul waited till later, we wanted to make
> Roger look good.
>
> We hacked along to Surrey Hill on gravel paths then headed into the single
> track, picking left or right at each junction and finding some lovely stuff to
> ride, and a few trees to hug, along with a little mud to face plant in ( Paul)
> . Roger met a muddy dip that got him angry, but he managed to clear it on the
> fourth attempt. We didn’t see any walkers, only one XC runner and two play
> bikers as we were heading home. The woods were ours alone to enjoy.
>
> Twas only a short time we had, just two hours to play before we had to head
> back to respective homes or work. BUT we had fun, a great way to start the day
> and work off a little Christamas pudding.
>
> sarah It might snow tomorrow, I’m leaving the muni handy!

Re: Ride off the christmas pud

And a weenie is ???

Re: FW: Ride off the christmas pud

Fletcher, Danny <dfletcher@flexjet.com> wrote:
> We do not use the word “pud” in polite conversation here in America.
snip
> seriously thought, “pud” means weenie over here.

your pulling my leg now arn’t you? try the other one its got bells on. anyhow,
weenie is just american for small isn’t it? as in teeny weeny , itsy bitsy,
yellow polka dot bikini.

sarah

Re: Ride off the christmas pud

Fletcher, Danny wrote:
> We do not use the word “pud” in polite conversation here in America. just
> kidding. I love the way you talk. seriously thought, “pud” means weenie over
> here. As in “pulling your pud”

After reading this thread, I found it difficult to keep a straight face as I
walked past the “Tidgy Puds” (small frozen Yorkshire puddings) in my local Asda
this evening.

I wonder if Asda’s new American owner, Walmart, will start stocking them
over there :slight_smile:


Danny Colyer (remove your.mind to reply)
http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny/danny.html “If you have a difficult
task, give it to a lazy man. He will find an easy way to do it.” - Genghis Khan

Re: FW: Ride off the christmas pud

I always thought it was diminutive for wiener which I understand is a small
sausage. Guess what that refers to…

Arnold the Aardvark

http://www.foxholly.demon.co.uk ICQ# 30592054

Re: FW: Ride off the christmas pud

----- Original Message ----- From: Arnold the Aardvark
<aardvark@foxholly.demon.co.uk> To: <unicycling@winternet.com> Sent: Friday,
December 29, 2000 11:52 PM Subject: Re: FW: Ride off the christmas pud

> I always thought it was diminutive for wiener which I understand is a small
> sausage. Guess what that refers to…
>

I wouldn’t know what you’re talking about.

Many, many English-collonial confusing idiom out there. Mad is a personal
favourite of mine when heard in conversation from Americans (they apparently
mean angry), as is pis*ed (which also means angry in the US).

{Please excuse poetic language} (American) ‘I was so pissed. I became
completely mad.’

Jon.