fun in the snow

I’ve never much cared for the whole winter thing (yet somehow I ended up going
to school in upstate NY)… but now that I’ve gotten into unicycling, I can’t
get enough of it.

Just riding in an open field is so much more fun with 12" of snow on it.
Downhill, I’d say, is ten times the fun on a unicycle than it is on a sled.
(though, where I am, unfortunately, there aren’t exactly many hills to speak of)

I was wondering, does anyone have any snow advice to offer? I can make it up
some hills, but if I loose traction going up, it’s all over, and I’m lucky if I
can mount again. If it’s flat, I can go fine, but mounting takes a couple of
tries, unless I find myself in an area with asphault beneath that snow.

I’m best at the standard reverse mount (is that the right word? the one where
you give it one idle before going forward) but I’m sure that’s far from ideal in
the snow. Can someone explain to me how to get a rolling mount working? (Is
rolling really what I want, or are there any better ones for rough terrain?)

thanks, jeff lutkus


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Re: fun in the snow

Three mounts that work well when mounting on slippery stuff (mud, snow or slugs)
or on an uphill grade are: a no kickback standard mount, a forward momentum
almost rolling mount, and a proper rolling mount.

I can’t do a proper rolling mount where the wheel never slows rolling. I can
come close and do what I call a forward momentum mount. This mount is how I
mount my Coker and is a handy mount for muni. The difference between this mount
and a proper rolling mount is that the wheel slows down noticeably (sometimes
even pausing) as I mount. It’s effective as it maintains some forward momentum
and helps you get started when it’s slippery.

To start out with work on learning a no kickback standard mount. Then work on
the forward momentum and rolling mount.
http://www.unicycling.org/unicycling/mounts/ has some good explanations of
mounts including the rolling mount. It’s hard to describe a mount with just text
and no video but the unicycling.org page still does a good job.

And no matter how you mount it ain’t easy to climb a slippery hill. Traction is
king and the less traction you have the more finesse and skill it takes to make
it up the hill.

john_childs

>From: “Jeff Lutkus” <lutkus@hotmail.com>
[snip]
>I was wondering, does anyone have any snow advice to offer? I can make it up
>some hills, but if I loose traction going up, it’s all over, and I’m lucky if I
>can mount again. If it’s flat, I can go fine, but mounting takes a couple of
>tries, unless I find myself in an area with asphault beneath that snow.
>
>I’m best at the standard reverse mount (is that the right word? the one where
>you give it one idle before going forward) but I’m sure that’s far from ideal
>in the snow. Can someone explain to me how to get a rolling mount working? (Is
>rolling really what I want, or are there any better ones for rough terrain?)
>
>thanks, jeff lutkus


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