freeing up space on a hard drive

I was installing eudora today and I noticed that my main C: drive only has
350MB of space left on it!

I have a 120 GB harddrive installed in the computer already, but I know I
need more space on my C drive.

What’s the best way to free up space on my main hard drive?

Any other suggestions?

Rodney

Re: freeing up space on a hard drive

Rodney Blackwell wrote:

> I was installing eudora today and I noticed that my main C: drive only has
> 350MB of space left on it!
>
> I have a 120 GB harddrive installed in the computer already, but I know I
> need more space on my C drive.
>
> What’s the best way to free up space on my main hard drive?

Use partition magic to reallocate more space to C:? (Assuming you have
the drive partitioned.)

Re: freeing up space on a hard drive

Well if you are using Win XP Pro you could change you existing basic disk
into a Dynamic disk as long as you don’t need to access the drive with any
older versions of Windows bellow is a description of what Dynamic disk do
for you.

You make this change by clicking on Start, Control Panel, Administrative
Tools, Computer Management, Disk Management and then going to help topics to
walk you through the process. But back up you data before doing any of this
and read the instructions carefully.

Dynamic disks and volumes
Dynamic disks provide features that basic disks do not, such as the ability
to create volumes that span multiple disks (spanned and striped volumes),
and the ability to create fault tolerant volumes (mirrored and RAID-5
volumes). All volumes on dynamic disks are known as dynamic volumes.

There are five types of dynamic volumes: simple, spanned, striped, mirrored,
and RAID-5. Mirrored and RAID-5 volumes are fault tolerant and are available
only on computers running Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Advanced Server,
Windows 2000 Datacenter Server, or Windows XP. However, you can use a
computer running Windows XP Professional to create mirrored and RAID-5
volumes on these operating systems.

Regardless of whether the dynamic disk uses the master boot record (MBR) or
GUID partition table (GPT) partition style, you can create up to 2,000
dynamic volumes per disk group, although the recommended number of dynamic
volumes is 32 or less per disk.

For information about managing dynamic volumes, see Manage dynamic volumes.

Limitations of dynamic disks and dynamic volumes
a… When installing Windows XP Professional. If a dynamic volume is
created from unallocated space on a dynamic disk, you cannot install Windows
XP Professional on that volume. However, you can extend the volume (if it is
a simple or spanned volume). This setup limitation occurs because Windows XP
Professional Setup recognizes only dynamic volumes that have an entry in the
partition table.
b… Portable computers. Dynamic disks are not supported on portable
computers, removable disks, detachable disks that use Universal Serial Bus
(USB) or IEEE 1394 (also called FireWire) interfaces, or on disks connected
to shared SCSI buses. If you are using a portable computer and right-click a
disk in the graphical or list view in Disk Management, you will not see the
option to convert the disk to dynamic.
c… Dual-boot computers. Dynamic volumes (and the data they contain)
cannot be accessed by, or created on, computers running MS-DOS, Windows 95,
Windows 98, Windows Millennium Edition, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows XP Home
Edition that are configured to dual-boot with Windows XP Professional or
Windows XP. If you want computers running these operating systems to be able
to access the data, store the data on basic volumes instead. For information
about basic volumes, see Basic disks and volumes.
d… When extending a volume. If a basic volume is converted to dynamic (by
converting a basic disk to dynamic), it may or may not have an entry in the
partition table depending on whether that volume was a system or boot
partition. If the converted volume was a system or boot partition it retains
an entry in the partition table. You can install Windows XP Professional on
the volume, but you cannot extend it. If the converted volume was not a
system or boot volume it does not have an entry in the partition table. You
cannot install Windows XP Professional on the volume, but you can extend it.
On Windows 2000, volumes converted from partitions have an entry in the
partition table. On Windows XP Professional, volumes converted from
partitions do not have an entry in the partition table unless the partitions
were system or boot partitions. In Disk Management, you can see if a volume
has an entry in the partition table by right-clicking the volume. If Extend
Volume is disabled, the volume has an entry in the partition table.

You can install Windows XP Professional only on simple and mirrored
dynamic volumes, and these volumes must have entries in the partition table
(which means that these volumes were system or boot volumes).

Gary Stein

“Rodney Blackwell” <rodney@webdiscuss.com> wrote in message
news:bqqned$303$1@server1.darklock.com
> I was installing eudora today and I noticed that my main C: drive only has
> 350MB of space left on it!
>
> I have a 120 GB harddrive installed in the computer already, but I know I
> need more space on my C drive.
>
> What’s the best way to free up space on my main hard drive?
>
> Any other suggestions?
> –
> Rodney
>
>

Re: freeing up space on a hard drive

dangit…that sounds like just what I need…but I just have XP Home.


Rodney Blackwell - http://www.5r5.net

“I’m the latest craze” - Macy Gray

“Gary Stein” <gestein@cnw.com> wrote in message
news:bqqq56$4gr$1@server1.darklock.com
> Well if you are using Win XP Pro you could change you existing basic disk
> into a Dynamic disk as long as you don’t need to access the drive with any
> older versions of Windows bellow is a description of what Dynamic disk do
> for you.
>
> You make this change by clicking on Start, Control Panel, Administrative
> Tools, Computer Management, Disk Management and then going to help topics
to
> walk you through the process. But back up you data before doing any of
this
> and read the instructions carefully.
>
>
>
> Dynamic disks and volumes
> Dynamic disks provide features that basic disks do not, such as the
ability
> to create volumes that span multiple disks (spanned and striped volumes),
> and the ability to create fault tolerant volumes (mirrored and RAID-5
> volumes). All volumes on dynamic disks are known as dynamic volumes.
>
> There are five types of dynamic volumes: simple, spanned, striped,
mirrored,
> and RAID-5. Mirrored and RAID-5 volumes are fault tolerant and are
available
> only on computers running Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Advanced
Server,
> Windows 2000 Datacenter Server, or Windows XP. However, you can use a
> computer running Windows XP Professional to create mirrored and RAID-5
> volumes on these operating systems.
>
> Regardless of whether the dynamic disk uses the master boot record (MBR)
or
> GUID partition table (GPT) partition style, you can create up to 2,000
> dynamic volumes per disk group, although the recommended number of dynamic
> volumes is 32 or less per disk.
>
> For information about managing dynamic volumes, see Manage dynamic
volumes.
>
> Limitations of dynamic disks and dynamic volumes
> a… When installing Windows XP Professional. If a dynamic volume is
> created from unallocated space on a dynamic disk, you cannot install
Windows
> XP Professional on that volume. However, you can extend the volume (if it
is
> a simple or spanned volume). This setup limitation occurs because Windows
XP
> Professional Setup recognizes only dynamic volumes that have an entry in
the
> partition table.
> b… Portable computers. Dynamic disks are not supported on portable
> computers, removable disks, detachable disks that use Universal Serial Bus
> (USB) or IEEE 1394 (also called FireWire) interfaces, or on disks
connected
> to shared SCSI buses. If you are using a portable computer and right-click
a
> disk in the graphical or list view in Disk Management, you will not see
the
> option to convert the disk to dynamic.
> c… Dual-boot computers. Dynamic volumes (and the data they contain)
> cannot be accessed by, or created on, computers running MS-DOS, Windows
95,
> Windows 98, Windows Millennium Edition, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows XP Home
> Edition that are configured to dual-boot with Windows XP Professional or
> Windows XP. If you want computers running these operating systems to be
able
> to access the data, store the data on basic volumes instead. For
information
> about basic volumes, see Basic disks and volumes.
> d… When extending a volume. If a basic volume is converted to dynamic
(by
> converting a basic disk to dynamic), it may or may not have an entry in
the
> partition table depending on whether that volume was a system or boot
> partition. If the converted volume was a system or boot partition it
retains
> an entry in the partition table. You can install Windows XP Professional
on
> the volume, but you cannot extend it. If the converted volume was not a
> system or boot volume it does not have an entry in the partition table.
You
> cannot install Windows XP Professional on the volume, but you can extend
it.
> On Windows 2000, volumes converted from partitions have an entry in the
> partition table. On Windows XP Professional, volumes converted from
> partitions do not have an entry in the partition table unless the
partitions
> were system or boot partitions. In Disk Management, you can see if a
volume
> has an entry in the partition table by right-clicking the volume. If
Extend
> Volume is disabled, the volume has an entry in the partition table.
>
> You can install Windows XP Professional only on simple and mirrored
> dynamic volumes, and these volumes must have entries in the partition
table
> (which means that these volumes were system or boot volumes).
>
>
>
> Gary Stein
>
> “Rodney Blackwell” <rodney@webdiscuss.com> wrote in message
> news:bqqned$303$1@server1.darklock.com
> > I was installing eudora today and I noticed that my main C: drive only
has
> > 350MB of space left on it!
> >
> > I have a 120 GB harddrive installed in the computer already, but I know
I
> > need more space on my C drive.
> >
> > What’s the best way to free up space on my main hard drive?
> >
> > Any other suggestions?
> > –
> > Rodney
> >
> >
>
>

Re: freeing up space on a hard drive

“Shena Delian O’Brien” <shena@darklock.com> wrote in message
news:bqqnq0$32b$1@server1.darklock.com
> Rodney Blackwell wrote:
>
> > I was installing eudora today and I noticed that my main C: drive only
has
> > 350MB of space left on it!
> >
> > I have a 120 GB harddrive installed in the computer already, but I know
I
> > need more space on my C drive.
> >
> > What’s the best way to free up space on my main hard drive?
>
> Use partition magic to reallocate more space to C:? (Assuming you have
> the drive partitioned.)

How could it partion more space if there is no more space?

The 120 GB drive is a separate drive and the C Drive is 18 GB (all full).


Rodney

Re: freeing up space on a hard drive

Rodney Blackwell wrote:
> How could it partion more space if there is no more space?
>
> The 120 GB drive is a separate drive and the C Drive is 18 GB (all full).

Is there anything on the 120 GB drive yet? In any case, you may be able
to make the 120 GB drive your C drive.

  • Gilby

Re: freeing up space on a hard drive

Rodney Blackwell wrote:

> How could it partion more space if there is no more space?
>
> The 120 GB drive is a separate drive and the C Drive is 18 GB (all full).

Do this …

Backup everything.

Get a copy of DriveCopy.

Move everything from the 18GB drive to the 120GB drive using drivecopy…

Then using Partion Magic partition your 120GB hard drive into reasonable
partitions and reformat the 18GB drive as a secondary drive in your system.