Free-mounting question

From what I’ve read, it seems that the standard practice for freemounting
is to have the pedals horizontal and get up onto the seat without rolling
the wheel much.

This doesn’t work for me. I put too much weight on the pedal and the
unicycle shoots out from under me. What I have found does work for me
is to put the pedal just behind the bottom of the stroke, and pedal it
back just enough to roll the wheel under me, and then start pedaling.
It works most of the time. Should I work on a different technique, or
just stick with what works for me?

I guess I can always just practice different mounts as my skills improve.

John

There are two pretty standard approaches to freemounting. Personal
preference normally decides which is easier I think.

  1. Start with your weak foot on the ground, and the pedal pointing
    diagonally at the ground between the wheel and your feet. Your strong
    foot should be resting on this pedal, which is quite close to you.
    Simultaneously step forwards and upwards so that the seat becomes
    vertically above the wheel. In doing so, you apply pressure to the
    pedal with your strong foot, and the wheel will roll back under you.

your weak foot will then find the far pedal, which will be swinging past
vertical towards you. After 1/4 to 1/2 a revolution backwards, you use
your strong foot to start pedalling forwards.

  1. The more direct approach starts about the same, but you may have the
    cranks slightly more horizontal and parallel to the ground. When you
    step up and forwards, apply just enough pressure to the pedal with your
    strong foot to avoid the unicycle rolling anywhere. You’ll end up on
    the seat, directly above the wheel, without the wheel having rolled
    anywhere. Then you’re free to pedal off, without ever rolling
    backwards. This requires a bit better feel for the amount of back
    pressure required to stop the wheel rolling back under you.

nic

On Thu, 20 Sep 2001, John wrote:

>
> From what I’ve read, it seems that the standard practice for
> freemounting is to have the pedals horizontal and get up onto the seat
> without rolling the wheel much.
>
> This doesn’t work for me. I put too much weight on the pedal and the
> unicycle shoots out from under me. What I have found does work for me
> is to put the pedal just behind the bottom of the stroke, and pedal
> it back just enough to roll the wheel under me, and then start
> pedaling. It works most of the time. Should I work on a different
> technique, or just stick with what works for me?
>
> I guess I can always just practice different mounts as my skills
> improve.
>
> John

Some techniques I have seen & tried.

Pedal crank horizontal, try to not roll back too much but help yourself by
doing this with the uni facing down hill, keep trying on less & less of a
slope, then work your way to doing it on an up hill slope.

Second method: As before pedal crank horizontal. Lean right over forward &
grab the front part of the wheel to steady it from rolling back as you put
weight on the pedal to mount.

My 7 year old can do a free mount with no problems, however my 10 year old
has struggled & we have analysed the free mounting techniques many times
(coming to a different conclusion on every occasion).

PS I have a Unicycle operator logo for the Nokia phone if anyone wants it
let me know (I drew it). //\

John, there are 2 basic techniques for freemounting. I would suggest that
you might be better with the first of these methods.

  1. You stay still wheel moves. Place your first foot on the nearest pedal
    at about 4.00 o’clock (this varies slightly with size of wheel, bigger
    the wheel the lower the pedal) with the seat in position. Apply weight
    to the pedal, the unicycle will then wind its way underneath you until
    the pedal is at the bottom (6.00 o’clock) and the frame is vertical.
    Place the second foot on the other pedal which will be at the top and
    apply a backwards motion. The pedals should be moved to where they are
    at 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock (horizontal) where your balance should be
    slightly forward and you will be ready to ride off forwards
    immediately. All of this should be done in a smooth action with the
    shoulders staying almost still. This is a good start for the more
    analytical learner and can be done holding on to bar or wall because
    your shoulders should stay almost still.

  2. You move and the wheel stays still. Place your first foot on the
    nearest pedal at about 3 o’clock with your seat in position and one
    hand on the front of the seat. Move forward as if stepping up on to a
    step… but, with putting as little weight on the step as possible. As
    you move forward it often helps to push the saddle forward slightly to
    keep the cranks horizontal where you want them (this also helps men!).
    This can be done relatively slowly and does not need to executed
    rapidly. The pedals should stay horizontal during whole of this
    exercise. When you are on top of the unicycle and the pedals are
    horizontal you will be ready to ride off. This tends to be better for
    the rider who is a “go for it” learner. In the long run this is a
    better start to learn as it give more control for the start

One technique for learning the second mount is the place the wheel up
against a curb so that it can not rotate backwards. This alleviates one
part of the process as the curb will keep the wheel still.

I hope this helps.

Roger

                     The UK's Unicycle Source
                   <a href="http://www.unicycle.uk.com/">http://www.unicycle.uk.com/</a>

----- Original Message ----- From: “John” <gianniz80@yahoo.com> To:
<unicycling@winternet.com> Sent: Thursday, September 20, 2001 3:07 AM
Subject: Free-mounting question

>
> From what I’ve read, it seems that the standard practice for
> freemounting is to have the pedals horizontal and get up onto the seat
> without rolling the wheel much.
>
> This doesn’t work for me. I put too much weight on the pedal and the
> unicycle shoots out from under me. What I have found does work for me
> is to put the pedal just behind the bottom of the stroke, and pedal
> it back just enough to roll the wheel under me, and then start
> pedaling. It works most of the time. Should I work on a different
> technique, or just stick with what works for me?
>
> I guess I can always just practice different mounts as my skills
> improve.
>
> John