free mount

lo’ had my uni for a month (ok longer than that BUT only a month since I
shortened the stem so I could ride it) anyway I can ride fairly well and turn
occaisonly. BUT I want to investigate the world on me uni and to do this I want
to learn the free mount. Tried various instructions on unicycling.org but
finding it difficult. Can any1 give me any help/ideas on how u learned the
freemount thanx Will

Re: free mount

In article <8s4tkp$4f9$1@plutonium.btinternet.com>, William Yates
<magik@btinternet.com> wrote: )lo’ )had my uni for a month (ok longer than that
BUT only a month since I )shortened the stem so I could ride it) anyway I can
ride fairly well and )turn occaisonly. )BUT I want to investigate the world on
me uni and to do this I want to learn )the free mount. Tried various
instructions on unicycling.org but finding it )difficult. )Can any1 give me any
help/ideas on how u learned the freemount

I’m in the same situation right now; I’ve gotten to the point where I can get
around, but once I am forced to stop I have to look around for something to
mount from. (Possible solution–never stop).

Having not yet succeeded, I don’t have real advice, but I’ve found that starting
from a curb (with the wheel chucked against the curb) at least allows me to go
through the motions of freemounting and usually manage to get up. It also gives
me another kind of non-free-mount to do.

I must admit I’m completely confounded on the real free mount and have given up
on it for now. I can’t manage to get up on the seat without the pedal my foot
is on going straight to the bottom, and then I don’t have any power to get
moving. -Tom

Re: free mount

Don’t worry it’s easy

First learn to idle descently. It’s a lot more fun to
do. I used a wall on one side of me and a chair on the other. Only tap the sides
for balance, don’t depend on them. Once you can idle a bit, free mount
exaclty the same with the wheel rolling backwards half a turn. Also get your
foot on the pedal ASAP! that will give you control earlier

— William Yates <magik@btinternet.com> wrote:
> lo’ had my uni for a month (ok longer than that BUT only a month since I
> shortened the stem so I could ride it) anyway I can ride fairly well and turn
> occaisonly. BUT I want to investigate the world on me uni and to do this I
> want to learn the free mount. Tried various instructions on unicycling.org but
> finding it difficult. Can any1 give me any help/ideas on how u learned the
> freemount thanx Will
>
>


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Re: free mount

— Greg House <ghouse@southwind.net>
> wrote:

>I found that if you think of the unicycle pivoting up with you propelling it,
>it’s easier. It took me longer to get the freemount where you roll the wheel
>back under you and then forward (like a half idle).
>
>The advice that helped me was to keep the uni wheel still and apply only as
>much force on the back pedal as is necessary to keep it from rolling as you
>jump on. Pause for a second as you get up on top to get your balance and then
>you can ride.

Good explanation.

I never much liked the idea of the wheel rolling backwards when I learned to
freemount. But this might be a result of learning to ride with the “curb
method” (starting block). I think I used to suffer by “pausing” too long once I
got on top. When I waited to see if I had my balance, it never felt right and
once I got more aggressive and started to pedal as soon as my second foot hit
the pedal I had much better results. Then once I got it, I could take much
longer before I would start pedaling. BTW-I rode for many weeks before I
learned to freemount. -Mark


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

RE: free mount

> Just don’t get discouraged William. It takes a little while.

That’s rule one of learning to unicycle and freemount.

> started mounting without the curb my starter leg no longer had the curb as
> resistance and went straight down. By the time I got used to that movement and
> learned to mount I was taking half a revolution (at least!) backwards and then
> had to change directions and pedal forwards.

I wouldn’t consider this the “wrong” way to mount, but it is slower and will
leave you behind in a group of people mounting the other way (especially on
bumpy trails).

I always recommend learning this method of mounting first, for these reasons:

  • Your foot will naturally peg the pedal at the bottom anyway
  • It’s beneficial to learn a bit of rocking and backward riding at the same time
  • On average, people seem to learn this method quicker.

As always when I give out instructions, I’ll add “Your mileage may vary.” Some
people learn the “quick mount” (below) more easily, but I’ll come back to that.

For most people learning to freemount in the open, no matter what they do, end
up with one pedal forcefully being held at the bottom of the pedal stroke while
they try to ride away from that difficult position. Since people inevitably seem
to end up there anyway, USA founder Bill Jenack used to teach the “standard”
mount based on this, plus for the reasons above.

The object is to press down on the rear pedal to bring the wheel underneath you.
Your pedal will go to the bottom and stop. It’s real hard to ride away with your
feet in the “dead spot”, as you may have already noticed, even if you’re
perfectly balanced. In order to ride away, you need two things. You need to be
falling forward, and you need some leverage on the pedals.

So, when your first foot hits the bottom and the wheel is somewhere under you,
pick up your other foot, with the toe pointed downward, and grab the top pedal
from the front, pushing it backward. Your goal is to take the wheel 1/4 turn
back, until the pedals are level. When you get there, you will be off balance to
the front, and have your feet where you need them so you can apply power and
ride away.

It takes lots of tries, and you have to overcome both the fear of going
backwards and the relatively long period of time when you can’t correct your
side to side balance. But when you’re done, you will have started on the road to
rocking and riding backward, core skills for unicycling.

The above method is educational, but slower. Below is what I will call the
“quick mount”.

In a quick mount, the wheel never goes backward. Instead, the wheel stays still
while you go forward, up and over it, so you can ride away. There is only one
hard part to this mount. Some people find it really hard, though others figure
it out right away. This is the part where you hold the pedal in place without
letting the wheel roll. If you press too soft, the pedal will come up, and maybe
toss you on your backside. If you press too hard, you’re back to the standard
mount, with your foot stuck at the bottom.

What I try to teach people is not to worry about pedal pressure. Instead, don’t
let your leg bend. Hold that leg rigid, and the pedal can’t go anywhere. So you
start behind the unicycle, with the pedals at or near level. Give a good jump up
to get you up and over the wheel, pushing off with your other foot and maybe
even swinging your arms to help. The important thing here is to push off hard
enough to get you in front of the wheel, so you can pedal away. Keep the
pedals level, and the pedaling away will be easy.

Repeat 1000 times, and if it still doesn’t work, ask the newsgroup.

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

“The hotel was great. You couldn’t trash the place.” - Andy Cotter, praising
the UNICON X Jing Yan hotel, which let us ride in the lobby and pretty much do
as we pleased.

RE: free mount

This is anecdotal, gleaned from teaching my son to freemount, so I’m making no
claims about it other than it’s something to consider.

When Drew was 8 and had become proficient at riding, I started him on the road
to freemounting by blocking his wheel, front and back, with 2x4s; pedals were in
the 8 and 2 o’clock positions, roughly. I had him practice hopping up onto the
pedals, then continue forward and hop off the uni. The whole time, the wheel was
prevented from moving at all. After a little while (maybe ten or so tries, he
could hop up, balance a bit, then hop back down. When he hit this stage, I
removed the front block and he was able to easily hop up, balance, and ride
away. Then I just substituted smaller things as the rear block, eventually
getting down to little 1/4" door shims. By that time, he was pretty good at just
keeping the wheel still and hopping up on it, and made a pretty quick transition
to the regular no-rocking freemount. I think that the initial tries with the
wheel entirely blocked helped him get the feel of hopping up and finding the
pedal. Anyway, I’ll test out this theory later in the year when I see my 13 year
old nephew–he picked up a 24" recently, and can ride pretty well (so I’m told)
but isn’t having any luck at all with freemounting.

Peter

Peter Kittle Department of English CSU, Chico Chico CA 95929-0830 ph:
530/898-5305 fax: 530/898-4450 email: pkittle@csuchico.edu www:
http://www.csuchico.edu/~pkittle

> ----------
> From: Peter Clinch Reply To: Peter Clinch Sent: Tuesday, October 17, 2000 1:48
> AM To: unicycling@winternet.com Subject: Re: free mount
>
> John Foss wrote:
> >
> > > Just don’t get discouraged William. It takes a little while.
> >
> > That’s rule one of learning to unicycle and freemount.
>
> Yup, just crossing that bridge myself at the moment. The first two sessions I
> dedicated to freemount I got absolutely nowhere. No progress at all from
> start to finish. But the third session it pretty much went okay from the
> start, even if I did have to grab a wall: I’d got onto the seat and the pedals
> were more or less horizontal, and the wheel hadn’t moved much, and that’s most
> of the work done, or so it seems to me.
>
> Summary: just because you don’t seem to be making any progress doesn’t mean
> you actually aren’t making any progress! As long as you can analyse why it
> isn’t working and at least think the right action (usually "weight on seat,
> not on pedals" for me), even if you can’t seem to do it at first, I think
> you’ll get there.
>
> Good luck, and hang in there with me! Pete (another uni-novice).
> –
> Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical
> Physics, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net
> p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/

RE: free mount

John wrote:

> Give a good jump up to get you up and over the wheel, pushing off with your
> other foot and maybe even swinging your arms to help. The important thing here
> is to push off hard enough to get you in front of the wheel, so you can
> pedal away.

This little self-check helped me a lot when I was learning this mount: Check
where you land after you attempt the mount. If you are ending up landing on your
feet with the unicycle in front of you, then you aren’t hopping up hard enough.
Keep that in mind… try and at least get over the unicycle every time that you
practice the mount. That was the hardest part for me.

After getting that, all I needed to learn was the best position for the pedal
when I started and how to hop up so that I wasn’t off center to one side or the
other. I was always afraid of falling towards the pedal-down side because I
thought I would be unable to get that foot free and I would fall down, so I
always tended to hop to the left a bit. I found that pointing the wheel slightly
to the left helped me correct my balance as I started off. After awhile I didn’t
need to do this.

Also, I found that I needed to avoid looking down to find the landing pedal as I
mounted, because if I did - I just went up and over instead of up and away :slight_smile:

Re: free mount

John Foss wrote:
>
> > Just don’t get discouraged William. It takes a little while.
>
> That’s rule one of learning to unicycle and freemount.

Yup, just crossing that bridge myself at the moment. The first two sessions I
dedicated to freemount I got absolutely nowhere. No progress at all from start
to finish. But the third session it pretty much went okay from the start, even
if I did have to grab a wall: I’d got onto the seat and the pedals were more or
less horizontal, and the wheel hadn’t moved much, and that’s most of the work
done, or so it seems to me.

Summary: just because you don’t seem to be making any progress doesn’t mean
you actually aren’t making any progress! As long as you can analyse why it
isn’t working and at least think the right action (usually “weight on seat,
not on pedals” for me), even if you can’t seem to do it at first, I think
you’ll get there.

Good luck, and hang in there with me! Pete (another uni-novice).

Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics,
Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net
p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/

Re: free mount

In article <631B3F1D150FD3118E4D00A0C9EC1BDA48125D@SERVER>, John Foss
<john_foss@asinet.com> wrote: ) )What I try to teach people is not to worry
about pedal pressure. Instead, )don’t let your leg bend. Hold that leg rigid,
and the pedal can’t go )anywhere. So you start behind the unicycle, with the
pedals at or near )level. Give a good jump up to get you up and over the wheel,
pushing off )with your other foot and maybe even swinging your arms to help. The
)important thing here is to push off hard enough to get you in front of the
)wheel, so you can pedal away. Keep the pedals level, and the pedaling away
)will be easy. ) )Repeat 1000 times, and if it still doesn’t work, ask the
newsgroup.

Inspired by the discussion here, I went back to attempting the free mount
yesterday evening, this time with some success. I actually started out with some
curb-chucked mounts against small curbs, and was getting up well enough on those
that I thought I’d try the free mount. And, well, it’s not pretty but I can
manage to do it about 1 in 4 times now, more when headed downhill. On the
successful attempts, I wind up twisted to the left, and usually catch the right
pedal at about 11:00, but I’ve got enough raw leg power to pedal it from there.

I’ve been riding almost every day, and I think that has made a big difference;
you really get a lot of work on slow riding and turning when you’re trying to
make it through Sproul Plaza at lunchtime, so the situation of being on a
stationary bike twisted sideways doesn’t seem as strange as when I first tried
the mount.

I went out and tried it again today, and basically am in the same place;
it’s slowing me down to have to try several times to free mount but I figure
in a week or two I’ll be hitting it every time and it’ll be faster to get
around. -Tom

Re: free mount

Greetings

In message “RE: free mount”, John Foss wrote…
>> Just don’t get discouraged William. It takes a little while.

This is very useful unicycling wisdom. I would like to suggest that it be
incoporated into the website at unicycling.org, even unedited,

>That’s rule one of learning to unicycle and freemount.
>
>> started mounting without the curb my starter leg no longer had the curb as
>> resistance and went straight down. By the time I got used to that movement
>> and learned to mount I was taking half a revolution (at least!) backwards
>> and then had to change directions and pedal forwards.
>
>I wouldn’t consider this the “wrong” way to mount, but it is slower and will
>leave you behind in a group of people mounting the other way (especially on
>bumpy trails).
>
>I always recommend learning this method of mounting first, for these reasons:
>- Your foot will naturally peg the pedal at the bottom anyway
>- It’s beneficial to learn a bit of rocking and backward riding at the
> same time
>- On average, people seem to learn this method quicker.
>
>As always when I give out instructions, I’ll add “Your mileage may vary.”
>Some people learn the “quick mount” (below) more easily, but I’ll come
>back to that.
>
>For most people learning to freemount in the open, no matter what they do, end
>up with one pedal forcefully being held at the bottom of the pedal stroke
>while they try to ride away from that difficult position. Since people
>inevitably seem to end up there anyway, USA founder Bill Jenack used to teach
>the “standard” mount based on this, plus for the reasons above.
>
>The object is to press down on the rear pedal to bring the wheel underneath
>you. Your pedal will go to the bottom and stop. It’s real hard to ride away
>with your feet in the “dead spot”, as you may have already noticed, even if
>you’re perfectly balanced. In order to ride away, you need two things. You
>need to be falling forward, and you need some leverage on the pedals.
>
>So, when your first foot hits the bottom and the wheel is somewhere under you,
>pick up your other foot, with the toe pointed downward, and grab the top pedal
>from the front, pushing it backward. Your goal is to take the wheel 1/4 turn
>back, until the pedals are level. When you get there, you will be off balance
>to the front, and have your feet where you need them so you can apply power
>and ride away.
>
>It takes lots of tries, and you have to overcome both the fear of going
>backwards and the relatively long period of time when you can’t correct your
>side to side balance. But when you’re done, you will have started on the road
>to rocking and riding backward, core skills for unicycling.
>
>The above method is educational, but slower. Below is what I will call the
>“quick mount”.
>
>In a quick mount, the wheel never goes backward. Instead, the wheel stays
>still while you go forward, up and over it, so you can ride away. There is
>only one hard part to this mount. Some people find it really hard, though
>others figure it out right away. This is the part where you hold the pedal in
>place without letting the wheel roll. If you press too soft, the pedal will
>come up, and maybe toss you on your backside. If you press too hard, you’re
>back to the standard mount, with your foot stuck at the bottom.
>
>What I try to teach people is not to worry about pedal pressure. Instead,
>don’t let your leg bend. Hold that leg rigid, and the pedal can’t go anywhere.
>So you start behind the unicycle, with the pedals at or near level. Give a
>good jump up to get you up and over the wheel, pushing off with your other
>foot and maybe even swinging your arms to help. The important thing here is to
>push off hard enough to get you in front of the wheel, so you can pedal
>away. Keep the pedals level, and the pedaling away will be easy.
>
>Repeat 1000 times, and if it still doesn’t work, ask the newsgroup.
>
>Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com
>
>“The hotel was great. You couldn’t trash the place.” - Andy Cotter, praising
>the UNICON X Jing Yan hotel, which let us ride in the lobby and pretty much do
>as we pleased.
>

Stay on top, Jack Halpern, IUF Vice President Website: http://www.kanji.org