Forward-only drive unicycle mounting and theory

The forward-only drive unicycle can be mounted using a solid post or fence for
support while getting on. Lean forward and carefully pedal so as to accelerate
forward to coasting speed. Balance can be maintained while accelerating forward
by varying the forward pedal pressure. If this is done carefully, backward pedal
pressure will not be needed to maintain balance. However, since backward pedal
pressure can not be applied, coasting is the only way to slow down (unless one
is going up a slight incline).

Note that on a level surface, forward pedaling requires that the unicycle be
accelerating forward, thus the unicycle’s speed increases monotonically
(constantly), until one decides to start coasting! After slowing down a bit via
coasting, go back to forward pedaling, continuing this cycle of pedaling and
coasting as long as possible.

Another way to mount is a jump mount to wheel walking, but the transistion from
tire to forward-only pedals is very difficult!

Good luck in your forward-only drive coasting adventures (dreams - the
forward-only drive hub is quite expensive to build and as you can see from the
above, quite limited in what can be done with it)!

Final note: Simply reverse the direction of the seat on a forward-only drive
unicycle to get a backward-only drive unicycle. Two unicycles for the price of
one. That can help justify the expense of the hub. :slight_smile:

For those of you who missed my original post:

>> I have a forward only drive “standard” unicycle which can be ridden by
>> applying forward only pressure on the pedals. Upon reaching the desired
>> speed, simply stop pedaling with feet still on the pedals and coast!
>>
>> The cycle has a special hub consisting of a hub shell with clutch bearing and
>> a regular bearing holding a flangeless (bare) 5/8" axle. Pedaling forward
>> engages the clutch bearing and thus fixes the axle to the hub shell and thus
>> provides forward motion. Pedaling in the opposite direction or stop pedaling,
>> disengages the clutch bearing (it now performs as a regular bearing) and the
>> hub shell and axle free wheel with respect to each other (and thus one is
>> coasting!).

Sincerely,

Ken Fuchs <kfuchs@winternet.com

Re: Forward-only drive unicycle mounting and theory

-----Original Message-----
>This may require an elecromagnetic braking system. A powerful generator
>connected to some dissipative device, with the addition of some power
>electronics or gearing you could dial your resistance. With an attitude sensor
>and control loop you could prevent falling off backwards!

=============
all this could be more easily achieved by using a fixed wheel…

Wayne.

Re: Forward-only drive unicycle mounting and theory

Hmmm, would a forward-only hub be more useful with a brake?

It may be necessary to have the brake permanently applied, though it could be a
very intelligent brake which prevented you from falling off backwards.

This may require an elecromagnetic braking system. A powerful generator
connected to some dissipative device, with the addition of some power
electronics or gearing you could dial your resistance. With an attitude sensor
and control loop you could prevent falling off backwards!

I have seen a German design for a geared freewheel hub for a recumbent or
compact cycle. If it exists, it would be ideal.

Stu Swift.


In article <199909160441.XAA20254@parka.winternet.com>, Ken Fuchs
<kfuchs@winternet.com> wrote:
> The forward-only drive unicycle can be mounted using a solid post or fence for
> support while getting on. Lean forward and carefully pedal so as to accelerate
> forward to coasting speed. Balance can be maintained while accelerating
> forward by varying the forward pedal pressure. If this is done carefully,
> backward pedal pressure will not be needed to maintain balance. However, since
> backward pedal pressure can not be applied, coasting is the only way to slow
> down (unless one is going up a slight incline).
>
> Note that on a level surface, forward pedaling requires that the unicycle be
> accelerating forward, thus the unicycle’s speed increases monotonically
> (constantly), until one decides to start coasting! After slowing down a bit
> via coasting, go back to forward pedaling, continuing this cycle of pedaling
> and coasting as long as possible.
>
> Another way to mount is a jump mount to wheel walking, but the transistion
> from tire to forward-only pedals is very difficult!
>
> Good luck in your forward-only drive coasting adventures (dreams - the
> forward-only drive hub is quite expensive to build and as you can see from the
> above, quite limited in what can be done with it)!
>
> Final note: Simply reverse the direction of the seat on a forward-
only
> drive unicycle to get a backward-only drive unicycle. Two unicycles for the
> price of one. That can help justify the expense of the
hub. :slight_smile:
>
> For those of you who missed my original post:
>
> >> I have a forward only drive “standard” unicycle which can be
ridden by
> >> applying forward only pressure on the pedals. Upon reaching the desired
> >> speed, simply stop pedaling with feet still on the pedals
and
> >> coast!
> >>
> >> The cycle has a special hub consisting of a hub shell with clutch bearing
> >> and a regular bearing holding a flangeless (bare) 5/8"
axle.
> >> Pedaling forward engages the clutch bearing and thus fixes the
axle to
> >> the hub shell and thus provides forward motion. Pedaling in the opposite
> >> direction or stop pedaling, disengages the clutch bearing
(it
> >> now performs as a regular bearing) and the hub shell and axle free wheel
> >> with respect to each other (and thus one is coasting!).
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Ken Fuchs <kfuchs@winternet.com>
>

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