Forward Hops, esp. seat out

I could use some pointers on forward hops, especially with the seat out in
front. I can only gap about three feet, which is not even enough to gap from one
railroad track to the other.

I’m especially interested in: When you are about to pounce, should the wheel
remain stationary or should it roll into it right before liftoff?

Any techniques of getting enough torque to keep the wheel from shooting out
behind you as you lean into it?

Chris Reeder reed8990@uidaho.edu

Re: Forward Hops, esp. seat out

Chris,

> I’m especially interested in: When you are about to pounce, should the wheel
> remain stationary or should it roll into it right before liftoff?
>
In my opinion, I think it’s best to think of gaps (and other hops), as a
stillstand followed by a very quick spring (not a deep-knee-bending jump). For
gaps, imagine that you are on an object (say a box) and want to gap to another
box. You hop up to the edge of the box and orient yourself diagonally to where
you are going (around 45 degrees). Get into a brief stillstand (longer makes it
easier to think about it but short is OK too), and start falling towards your
goal. When you are leaning the appropriate amount, spring towards the object.
The challenge here is to learn by trial and error the correct amount of lean
before you spring (it’s usually not that much). With practice it should be
possible to land in a stillstand on the other side.

> Any techniques of getting enough torque to keep the wheel from shooting out
> behind you as you lean into it?

The diagonal orientation minimizes both tire foldover as you spring (although
this can be fixed just by pumping the tire up more), and also prevents the wheel
from shooting backwards as you hop. A bit more pressure is focused on the front
foot- I find that if I think about springing off the front foot, the back foot
follows suit with an appropriate amount of pressure.

The above technique works if you are gapping onto something fairly big, or if
you are going for something narower like a railway track but intend to keep
going off the other side. It also is the most forgiving position if you are
hopping onto something narrow, and gapping from there to somewhere else. If you
are gapping, say, to a railing and wish to start riding along it, it’s necessary
to spring with a body (and wheel) orientation that’s somewhat more parallel to
the railing.

The video clip at <biketrials.com> (Under “store” on the left bar, click on
Universe, and then “…going
psycho”) has an OK clip of this.

Cheers,

Kris.

pps maybe this could be posted somewhere?

> –
> Chris Reeder reed8990@uidaho.edu


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