Footwear or Foot Where?

Hello Once again everyone!

It’s been a while since I lasted posted here so I will breifly update you on my process… So far I can freemount, and ride about 25 feet without too many major problems. Not too much further then where I was in June, but I’ve been away a lot without access to my uni.

One thing that continues to bother me is where to put my feet on the pedals. Lately I have taken to using my toes or the ball of my foot simply because I often walk on my toes. Is this where my feet should be? Another question I had was what should I be wearing on my feet. Most of the time I wear running shoes, but I have tried riding in my theatre shoes (they are similar to dance shoes).

Even if you don’t have a definite answer, post back with what your preferences are, it might be interesting to see what you all are doing!

Krissy :sunglasses:

For freestyle and general riding (anything that won’t hurt my feet) I prefer to not wear shoes and to place the arch of my foot on the pedal.

Good luck,
Andrew

Currently I use Airwalks, $20 at Sports Authority. I like the grip and the flat sole on them. When I ride, I always try to use the ball of my feet. If I use my arch, my whole foot cramps from the lower circulation.

my $.02

Daniel

Footwear there ~>

It depends on the terrain and your riding style. I like to wear boots or shoes, boots give better ankle support. For general riding, if your seat is up reasonably high, I think it’s best to ride with the balls of your feet over the pedals, because it gives you a smoother circle, and greater leverage because you can flex your ankles a bit (some people refer to it as “ankling”). There are two drawbacks I can think of for using the balls of your feet, one is that it makes them less stable than they would be in the arches, and another is that they are more prone to bending upwards if you drop off something. So, when I encounter rough, bumpy terrain, or staircases, or drop offs, I usually move my feet forwards so that the arches of my feet are over the pedals. The heel of my boot presses against the back of the pedal, making for quite a stable platform. This way when I run over bumps my feet are not thrown off the pedals, and if I drop off something my feet aren’t bent painfully upwards upon the landing.

There has been several threads on this subject already. If you are interested to read what people have posted in the past, you could check out this old foot placement thread, or you could mark Google Groups Rec.Sport.Unicycling into your favourites for searching old RSU threads.

Re: Footwear or Foot Where?

Krissy,
I’m a newbie also. And like yourself I’ve just got to the point where I can
freemount without major problems. My last practice session was about an
hour with no assisted mounts. First time I’ve done that. My experience is
limited so take the following with a grain of salt.

Regarding foot placement. I feel I have better control with the ball of my
foot on the peddle. Some of this may be from rode biking. I’ve spent many
hours with my feet clipped into a certain position on peddles and anything
else just feels odd.

I’ve tried 4 pair of shoes so far. My only advise is make sure that the
sole to peddle contact feels secure. I started with running shoes but the
width of the sole sometimes rubs the crank. I then tried narrower shoes I
already had. Old racquetball shoes, newer adidas tennis shoes, old-style
canvas flat soled shoes. The sole on the racquetball and tennis shoes were
too hard and I didn’t feel good control. The old canvas were just too
flimsy. I’m back to the running shoes until I find something better.

-Cubby

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It all depends on what kind of riding your going to do. For trials get skateboarding shoes, and when dropping I always have my arches on the padals to stop the pedals from shooting out but while doing regular trials just hopping around I have the balls of my feet on the pedals.